P. Piwek
http://data.open.ac.uk/person/2515c15e5a8e5ef71a6e3a3c05d159fc
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Biography <p>Dr Paul Piwek holds first-class degrees (both<em>cum laude</em>)&nbsp;from the Universities of Tilburg and Amsterdam. He studied linguistics, computer science and philosophy (Tilburg University, Netherlands) and the philosophy of linguistics and cognitive science (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands). He gained his PhD in 1998 at&nbsp;the Institute for Perception Research (Eindhoven University and Philips Research)&nbsp;with a thesis entitled&#39;Logic, Information&amp; Conversation&#39;. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer (i.e. Associate Professor) in computing at the Open University.</p><p>He has co-chaired several workshops and conferences, including the 2004 International Natural Language Generation Conference, the 2010 Question Generation Workshop (and Shared Task and Evaluation Campaign) and the 2014 AISB symposium on Questions, Dialogue and Discourse. He has edited special issues of journals such as Discourse Processes, the Journal of Logic, Language and Information, Language&amp; Computation and Discourse&amp; Dialogue.</p><p>He has led several projects at the Open University, with funding from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA), and the eSTEeM initiave.</p><p>His research has been published in top conferences (including ACL, COLING, EACL, IVA, and&nbsp;NAACL) and journals (including Artificial Intelligence, Synthese, Journal of Logic, Language&amp; Information, and the&nbsp;Journal of Pragmatics).</p>
Description <p>Dr Paul Piwek holds first-class degrees (both<em>cum laude</em>)&nbsp;from the Universities of Tilburg and Amsterdam. He studied linguistics, computer science and philosophy (Tilburg University, Netherlands) and the philosophy of linguistics and cognitive science (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands). He gained his PhD in 1998 at&nbsp;the Institute for Perception Research (Eindhoven University and Philips Research)&nbsp;with a thesis entitled&#39;Logic, Information&amp; Conversation&#39;. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer (i.e. Associate Professor) in computing at the Open University.</p><p>He has co-chaired several workshops and conferences, including the 2004 International Natural Language Generation Conference, the 2010 Question Generation Workshop (and Shared Task and Evaluation Campaign) and the 2014 AISB symposium on Questions, Dialogue and Discourse. He has edited special issues of journals such as Discourse Processes, the Journal of Logic, Language and Information, Language&amp; Computation and Discourse&amp; Dialogue.</p><p>He has led several projects at the Open University, with funding from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA), and the eSTEeM initiave.</p><p>His research has been published in top conferences (including ACL, COLING, EACL, IVA, and&nbsp;NAACL) and journals (including Artificial Intelligence, Synthese, Journal of Logic, Language&amp; Information, and the&nbsp;Journal of Pragmatics).</p>
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Job title
  • Senior Lecturer
  • Senior Lecturer
overview <p dir="ltr">Dr Paul Piwek studied linguistics, computer science and philosophy (Tilburg University, Netherlands) and the philosophy of linguistics and cognitive science (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands). He gained his PhD in 1998 at&nbsp;the Institute for Perception Research (Eindhoven University and Philips Research)&nbsp;with a thesis entitled&#39;Logic, Information&amp; Conversation&#39;. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer (i.e. Associate Professor) in computing at the Open University.</p><p dir="ltr">He has co-chaired several workshops and conferences, including the 2004 International Natural Language Generation Conference, the 2010 Question Generation Workshop (and Shared Task and Evaluation Campaign) and the 2014 AISB symposium on Questions, Dialogue and Discourse. He has edited special issues of journals such as Discourse Processes, the Journal of Logic, Language and Information, Language&amp; Computation and Discourse&amp; Dialogue.</p><p dir="ltr">He has led several projects at the Open University, with funding from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA), and the eSTEeM initiave.</p><p dir="ltr">His research has been published in top conferences (including ACL, COLING, EACL, IVA, and&nbsp;NAACL) and journals (including Artificial Intelligence, Synthese, Journal of Logic, Language&amp; Information, and the&nbsp;Journal of Pragmatics).</p>
Research overview
  • <p>Dr Piwek&#39;s research is driven by the question&lsquo;How do we, humans, use language to communicate information?&rsquo; What is it that allows us to communicate information about objects, people, events, situations and even abstract ideas by producing certain noises or making ink marks on a piece of paper? How do we use language and gestures, such as pointing, to refer to the things in our surroundings? What makes us ask a question? What role do reasoning and argumentation play in our ability to communicate with each other? He studies these questions by constructing computer programs that simulate how people produce and understand language. His work draws on insights and ideas from several fields of study including linguistics, computer science, philosophy and cognitive science. His theoretical work&nbsp;is complemented by several initiatives that translate the results from this work into tools that help people navigate, communicate and use information more effectively.</p>
  • <p dir="ltr">Dr Piwek&#39;s research is driven by the question&lsquo;How do we, humans, use language to communicate information?&rsquo; What is it that allows us to communicate information about objects, people, events, situations and even abstract ideas by producing certain noises or making ink marks on a piece of paper? How do we use language and gestures, such as pointing, to refer to the things in our surroundings? What makes us ask a question? What role do reasoning and argumentation play in our ability to communicate with each other? He studies these questions by constructing computer programs that simulate how people produce and understand language. His work draws on insights and ideas from several fields of study including linguistics, computer science, philosophy and cognitive science. His theoretical work&nbsp;is complemented by several initiatives that translate the results from this work into tools that help people navigate, communicate and use information more effectively.</p>
Teaching overview <p dir="ltr">Dr Piwek has written Level 1 materials&nbsp;on<em>information overload</em>and<em>freedom of information in the digital age</em>. This includes a unit which helps students develop their argumentation skills using&nbsp;the<em>argument mapping</em>technique.&nbsp;He chaired the production of a Level 2 module on<em>algorithms, data structures and computability</em>. For this module&nbsp;he also authored materials on<em>proof, computability and computational complexity</em>.</p>
Type Person
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  • Dr Paul Piwek
  • Paul Piwek
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Family name Piwek
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  • Paul
  • P.
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  • P. Piwek
  • Paul Piwek
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