Brexit and emergent politics: introduction to the special issue
http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/57198
is a Article , Academic article

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Date
  • 2018
  • 2019
  • 2019
Status Peer reviewed
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  • http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/document/690992
  • http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/document/690993
  • http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/document/690996
  • http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/document/690997
  • http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/document/690998
  • http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/document/690999
  • http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/document/693285
Abstract
  • Brexit has been described as a landmark event marking what Gilbert (2015) has neatly described as the ‘long 90s’, meaning the period since the mid-90s during which neoliberalism became an unquestionable assumption in the running of the economy and politics of western democracies. Alongside the election of Trump as President of the United States and the rise of the far-right across Europe, Brexit has been interpreted as marking a shift away from the hegemony of neoliberalism towards a new kind of politics whose shape is still emerging. Scholars from social psychology and other social sciences have studied in much detail the factors behind an apparent shift in citizens’ political allegiances from the ‘consensual’ politics of the centre to more conflictual politics. On the one hand, the turn to the left (such as with Bernie Sanders in the US and Jeremy Corbyn in the UK) is often viewed with suspicion because it challenges the hegemony of neoliberal economics, and on the other hand, the rise of the right, particularly the extreme anti-immigration and anti-Islamic right, is seen as signifying a new era of nationalism and authoritarianism. Brexit is commonly seen as part of this bigger trend against ‘politics as usual’. Political science accounts of these shifts often stress the disillusionment of the ‘left behind’ communities (e.g. Hobolt, 2016) and the failure of capitalism to sustain equal and sustainable societies, particularly in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. This special issue aims to contribute to these discussions. Our focus, however, is somewhat different: we are less interested in identifying the causes of political changes than in the very processes of emergence: the phase of being in-between what was before and what is about to come. Emergence in this sense is by definition disruptive: it is not simply the occurrence of something new; it is the occurrence of something new which changes the quality of what follows it.
  • Brexit has been described as a landmark event marking what Gilbert (2015) has neatly described as the ‘long 90s’, meaning the period since the mid-90s during which neoliberalism became an unquestionable assumption in the running of the economy and politics of western democracies. Alongside the election of Trump as President of the United States and the rise of the far-right across Europe, Brexit has been interpreted as marking a shift away from the hegemony of neoliberalism towards a new kind of politics whose shape is still emerging. Scholars from social psychology and other social sciences have studied in much detail the factors behind an apparent shift in citizens’ political allegiances from the ‘consensual’ politics of the centre to more conflictual politics. On the one hand, the turn to the left (such as with Bernie Sanders in the US and Jeremy Corbyn in the UK) is often viewed with suspicion because it challenges the hegemony of neoliberal economics, and on the other hand, the rise of the right, particularly the extreme anti-immigration and anti-Islamic right, is seen as signifying a new era of nationalism and authoritarianism. Brexit is commonly seen as part of this bigger trend against ‘politics as usual’. Political science accounts of these shifts often stress the disillusionment of the ‘left behind’ communities (e.g. Hobolt, 2016) and the failure of capitalism to sustain equal and sustainable societies, particularly in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. This special issue aims to contribute to these discussions. Our focus, however, is somewhat different: we are less interested in identifying the causes of political changes than in the very processes of emergence: the phase of being in-between what was before and what is about to come. Emergence in this sense is by definition disruptive: it is not simply the occurrence of something new; it is the occurrence of something new which changes the quality of what follows it.
Authors authors
Type
Label
  • Andreouli, Eleni ; Kaposi, David and Stenner, Paul (2018). Brexit and emergent politics: introduction to the special issue. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology (In Press).
  • Andreouli, Eleni ; Kaposi, David and Stenner, Paul (2019). Brexit and emergent politics: introduction to the special issue. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology (In Press).
  • Andreouli, Eleni ; Kaposi, David and Stenner, Paul (2019). Brexit and emergent politics: introduction to the special issue. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology (In Press).
Title
  • Brexit and emergent politics: introduction to the special issue
  • Brexit and emergent politics: introduction to the special issue