Little Stephen: infantilism, projection and naturalism in the construction of mental disablement
http://data.open.ac.uk/oro/47414
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Date 1992
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Status Peer reviewed
Abstract There are many ways of describing my brother. That he has Down's Syndrome is one fact about him and does not, to my mind, tell you very much. Sometimes I objectify him, by seeing him as someone "with Down's Syndrome", someone who is "different". On the other hand, I just relate to him as my brother; I feel close to him, we have shared experiences and we have the same looks. But even as I write about him as an individual, I am doing so in the context of this book which brings us back to focusing on him as a member of a particular category. Does the reductive process begin as soon as I single him out as the subject of my text? Down's Syndrome is merely one fact about my brother and does not in any sense define his whole person.
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Label Evans, Jessica (1992). Little Stephen: infantilism, projection and naturalism in the construction of mental disablement. In: Hevey, David ed. The Creatures Time Forgot: Photography and Disability Imagery. London: Routledge, pp. 134–141.
Title Little Stephen: infantilism, projection and naturalism in the construction of mental disablement
Creator Jessica Evans
Dataset Open Research Online
Publisher Routledge