Environment: Following the flows
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/u116_2
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Dataset OpenLearn
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Subject Environmental Science
Course u116
To u116
Relates to course u116
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-27T08:49:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-27T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2014-03-06T12:31:14.000Z
  • 2016-03-07T10:38:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-07T11:03:57.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Environment: Following the flows
Title Environment: Following the flows
Description
  • <p>The scientific theory of plate tectonics suggests that at least some of these Arctic lands were once tropical. Since then the continents have moved and ice has changed the landscape. This unit will concentrate on evidence from the last 800,000 years using information collected from ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and will use this evidence to discuss current and possible future climate. The cores show that there have been nine periods in the recent past when large areas of the Earth were covered by ice. During the last 10,000 years – called the Holocene – there has been an unusually stable climate compared with the rest of the record, and the Holocene encompasses the entire development of human civilisation.</p><p>The Arctic, like any region, has always undergone climate change but there is evidence, for example in the decreasing sea ice cover, that suggests that the changes are happening faster. I intend to show how evidence from the ice cores suggests that flows of chemicals and energy dominate natural systems and cause these changes. I will discuss flows of water, heat and even pollution around the planet and show how, through positive feedback processes, the flows that are affecting the Arctic are already changing the whole planet. There will be further changes, with an impact on us all. The Arctic is often considered a victim of climate change – and it certainly is – but I hope to show that Sheila Watt-Cloutier was also right when she described the Arctic as a planetary barometer.</p><p>To discover the evidence that the Earth is dominated by flows I will start with that most famous Arctic animal of all – the polar bear.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course U116 <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/u116.htm"><i>Environment: Journeys through a changing world</i></a></span>.</p>
  • What affects the atmospheric and ocean flows? This unit explores the mechanisms that are important; the most rapid carrier is the wind. The basic principle of global atmospheric circulation is simple: warm air rises and cold air sinks. How does this principle affect the atmosphere and flow of water in practical terms?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-science/environment-following-the-flows/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-science/environment-following-the-flows/content-section-0">Environment: Following the flows</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>The scientific theory of plate tectonics suggests that at least some of these Arctic lands were once tropical. Since then the continents have moved and ice has changed the landscape. This course will concentrate on evidence from the last 800,000 years using information collected from ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and will use this evidence to discuss current and possible future climate. The cores show that there have been nine periods in the recent past when large areas of the Earth were covered by ice. During the last 10,000 years – called the Holocene – there has been an unusually stable climate compared with the rest of the record, and the Holocene encompasses the entire development of human civilisation.</p><p>The Arctic, like any region, has always undergone climate change but there is evidence, for example in the decreasing sea ice cover, that suggests that the changes are happening faster. I intend to show how evidence from the ice cores suggests that flows of chemicals and energy dominate natural systems and cause these changes. I will discuss flows of water, heat and even pollution around the planet and show how, through positive feedback processes, the flows that are affecting the Arctic are already changing the whole planet. There will be further changes, with an impact on us all. The Arctic is often considered a victim of climate change – and it certainly is – but I hope to show that Sheila Watt-Cloutier was also right when she described the Arctic as a planetary barometer.</p><p>To discover the evidence that the Earth is dominated by flows I will start with that most famous Arctic animal of all – the polar bear.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/u116?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">U116 <i>Environment: journeys through a changing world</i></a></span>.</p>
  • What affects the atmospheric and ocean flows? This free course, Environment: Following the flows, explores the mechanisms that are important; the most rapid carrier is the wind. The basic principle of global atmospheric circulation is simple: warm air rises and cold air sinks. How does this principle affect the atmosphere and flow of water in practical terms? <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-science/environment-following-the-flows/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-science/environment-following-the-flows/content-section-0">Environment: Following the flows</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • What affects the atmospheric and ocean flows? This free course, Environment: Following the flows, explores the mechanisms that are important; the most rapid carrier is the wind. The basic principle of global atmospheric circulation is simple: warm air rises and cold air sinks. How does this principle affect the atmosphere and flow of water in practical terms? <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-science/environment-following-the-flows/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 07 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-science/environment-following-the-flows/content-section-0">Environment: Following the flows</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016