Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/tl_cit5
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
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URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-27T08:29:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-27T09:29:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:49:41.000Z
  • 2016-03-03T16:03:31.000Z
  • 2016-03-08T11:02:43.000Z
  • 2016-03-17T14:32:54.000Z
  • 2016-03-29T12:10:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-29T12:32:05.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label
  • Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy
  • Teaching citizenship: work and the economy
Title
  • Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy
  • Teaching citizenship: work and the economy
Description
  • <p> The issue of &#x2018;citizenship, work and the economy’ is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers).</p><p>Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or holiday jobs of their own. They are all likely to spend some time on work-experience programmes. Their parents will normally have to engage with work to support their families. But do they know much about their rights and responsibilities at work? This unit explores aspects of work, including child labour and its relationship to citizenship for those teaching this subject in secondary schools.</p><p>Find out more about studying with The Open University by <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses?LKCAMPAIGN=OLSU_KeepLearning&amp;MEDIA=_OU">visiting our online prospectus</a></span>.</p>
  • The issue of ‘citizenship, work and the economy’ is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers). Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or holiday jobs of their own. They are all likely to spend some time on work-experience programmes. Their parents will normally have to engage with work to support their families. But do they know much about their rights and responsibilities at work? This unit explores aspects of work, including child labour and its relationship to citizenship for those teaching this subject in secondary schools.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/teaching-citizenship-work-and-the-economy/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/teaching-citizenship-work-and-the-economy/content-section-0">Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • The issue of 'citizenship, work and the economy' is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers). Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or holiday jobs of their own. They are all likely to spend some time on work-experience programmes. Their parents will normally have to engage with work to support their families. But do they know much about their rights and responsibilities at work? This free course, Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy, explores aspects of work, including child labour and its relationship to citizenship for those teaching this subject in secondary schools.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/teaching-citizenship-work-and-the-economy/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/teaching-citizenship-work-and-the-economy/content-section-0">Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • <p> The issue of &#x2018;citizenship, work and the economy’ is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers).</p><p>Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or holiday jobs of their own. They are all likely to spend some time on work-experience programmes. Their parents will normally have to engage with work to support their families. But do they know much about their rights and responsibilities at work? This unit explores aspects of work, including child labour and its relationship to citizenship for those teaching this subject in secondary schools.</p>
  • The issue of 'citizenship, work and the economy' is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers). Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or holiday jobs of their own. They are all likely to spend some time on work-experience programmes. Their parents will normally have to engage with work to support their families. But do they know much about their rights and responsibilities at work? This free course, Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy, explores aspects of work, including child labour and its relationship to citizenship for those teaching this subject in secondary schools.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/teaching-citizenship-work-and-the-economy/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/teaching-citizenship-work-and-the-economy/content-section-0">Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p> The issue of &#x2018;citizenship, work and the economy’ is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers).</p><p>Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or holiday jobs of their own. They are all likely to spend some time on work-experience programmes. Their parents will normally have to engage with work to support their families. But do they know much about their rights and responsibilities at work? This course explores aspects of work, including child labour and its relationship to citizenship for those teaching this subject in secondary schools.</p><p>Find out more about studying with The Open University by <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses?LKCAMPAIGN=OLSU_KeepLearning&amp;MEDIA=_OU">visiting our online prospectus</a></span>.</p>