The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology
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Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
URL the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology
Locator the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2009-05-17T23:00:00.000Z
  • 2010-04-12T23:28:00.000Z
  • 2010-04-12T23:28:38.000Z
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology
Title The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology
Description
  • How - and why - would you build a machine 10,000 times thinner than a human hair? This album features experts discussing the paradigm shift that is occurring in science. Scientists are learning to manipulate atoms on the scale of a billionth of a metre and control them to perform specific tasks. They can emulate biological and chemical systems to fabricate machines that will destroy cancer cells in the body, giving us nano-drugs of the future; and IBM is using nano-technology for information storage on a molecular scale. There are many other applications which will have a significant impact on the way we live. This album also provides an introduction to quantum computing and quantum mechanics. The material forms part of The Open University course S250 Science in context.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Tue, 13 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology">The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2010
  • How - and why - would you build a machine 10,000 times thinner than a human hair? This album features experts discussing the paradigm shift that is occurring in science. Scientists are learning to manipulate atoms on the scale of a billionth of a metre and control them to perform specific tasks. They can emulate biological and chemical systems to fabricate machines that will destroy cancer cells in the body, giving us nano-drugs of the future; and IBM is using nano-technology for information storage on a molecular scale. There are many other applications which will have a significant impact on the way we live. This album also provides an introduction to quantum computing and quantum mechanics. The material forms part of The Open University course S250 Science in context.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Tue, 13 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology">The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010
  • How - and why - would you build a machine 10,000 times thinner than a human hair? This album features experts discussing the paradigm shift that is occurring in science. Scientists are learning to manipulate atoms on the scale of a billionth of a metre and control them to perform specific tasks. They can emulate biological and chemical systems to fabricate machines that will destroy cancer cells in the body, giving us nano-drugs of the future; and IBM is using nano-technology for information storage on a molecular scale. There are many other applications which will have a significant impact on the way we live. This album also provides an introduction to quantum computing and quantum mechanics. The material forms part of The Open University course S250 Science in context.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Mon, 18 May 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology">The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.
  • How - and why - would you build a machine 10,000 times thinner than a human hair? This album features experts discussing the paradigm shift that is occurring in science. Scientists are learning to manipulate atoms on the scale of a billionth of a metre and control them to perform specific tasks. They can emulate biological and chemical systems to fabricate machines that will destroy cancer cells in the body, giving us nano-drugs of the future; and IBM is using nano-technology for information storage on a molecular scale. There are many other applications which will have a significant impact on the way we live. This album also provides an introduction to quantum computing and quantum mechanics. The material forms part of The Open University course S250 Science in context. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Tue, 13 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology">The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010
  • How - and why - would you build a machine 10,000 times thinner than a human hair? This album features experts discussing the paradigm shift that is occurring in science. Scientists are learning to manipulate atoms on the scale of a billionth of a metre and control them to perform specific tasks. They can emulate biological and chemical systems to fabricate machines that will destroy cancer cells in the body, giving us nano-drugs of the future; and IBM is using nano-technology for information storage on a molecular scale. There are many other applications which will have a significant impact on the way we live. This album also provides an introduction to quantum computing and quantum mechanics. The material forms part of The Open University course S250 Science in context.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Tue, 13 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/the-next-big-thing-nanotechnology">The Next Big Thing: Nanotechnology</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010