Creating musical sounds
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/ta212_2
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
Course ta212
To ta212
Relates to course ta212
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-01T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-01T09:40:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:47:54.000Z
  • 2014-10-08T13:31:53.000Z
  • 2015-01-27T13:01:25.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Creating musical sounds
Title Creating musical sounds
Description
  • <p>This unit is concerned with the tools required to perform music, namely musical instruments. When you see the term <i>musical instrument</i>, you probably automatically think of the instruments found in an orchestra such as the violins, trumpets and flutes. Maybe you think of keyboard instruments like the piano or the organ. Or perhaps you visualise more modern instruments such as the electric guitar or the electronic synthesiser. You may even think of the human voice. These are all certainly examples of what we traditionally consider to be musical instruments (<a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-2#fig001_001">Figure 1</a>). But what is it about these examples that makes us classify them as musical instruments?</p><p>On the face of it, they all seem bewilderingly different. Some involve plucking or bowing a string, others involve blowing air through a tube, and still others involve pressing keys. As if this weren't enough, consider the difference in size between some of these instruments. A flute is small enough to be able to be carried comfortably in one hand, while a pipe organ may be so large that it has to be permanently installed in a spacious building like a church or concert hall. However, despite all these differences, there are some features that are common to all musical instruments. Here we shall examine the general principles of sound production that apply to all instruments.</p><p>Please note that <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-5.12#act001_021_000">Activity 21</a> and <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-5.12#act001_022_000">Activity 22</a> are optional and require additional materials and software.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract relevant to The Open University course TA212 <i>The technology of music</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses">subject area</a></span>.</p>
  • <p>This unit is concerned with the tools required to perform music, namely musical instruments. When you see the term <i>musical instrument</i>, you probably automatically think of the instruments found in an orchestra such as the violins, trumpets and flutes. Maybe you think of keyboard instruments like the piano or the organ. Or perhaps you visualise more modern instruments such as the electric guitar or the electronic synthesiser. You may even think of the human voice. These are all certainly examples of what we traditionally consider to be musical instruments (<a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-2#fig001_001">Figure 1</a>). But what is it about these examples that makes us classify them as musical instruments?</p><p>On the face of it, they all seem bewilderingly different. Some involve plucking or bowing a string, others involve blowing air through a tube, and still others involve pressing keys. As if this weren't enough, consider the difference in size between some of these instruments. A flute is small enough to be able to be carried comfortably in one hand, while a pipe organ may be so large that it has to be permanently installed in a spacious building like a church or concert hall. However, despite all these differences, there are some features that are common to all musical instruments. Here we shall examine the general principles of sound production that apply to all instruments.</p><p>Please note that <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-5.12#act001_021_000">Activity 21</a> and <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-5.12#act001_022_000">Activity 22</a> are optional and require additional materials and software.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course<span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/ta212.htm"><i> The technology of music</i> (TA212).</a></span></p>
  • How do different instruments produce the sounds we classify as music? How do we decide whether something whether a piano or a vacuum cleaner is actually a musical instrument? In this free course, Creating musical sounds, we investigate the way vibrations and sound waves are harnessed to create music. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 01 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-0">Creating musical sounds</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>This unit is concerned with the tools required to perform music, namely musical instruments. When you see the term <i>musical instrument</i>, you probably automatically think of the instruments found in an orchestra such as the violins, trumpets and flutes. Maybe you think of keyboard instruments like the piano or the organ. Or perhaps you visualise more modern instruments such as the electric guitar or the electronic synthesiser. You may even think of the human voice. These are all certainly examples of what we traditionally consider to be musical instruments (<a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-2#fig001-001">Figure 1</a>). But what is it about these examples that makes us classify them as musical instruments?</p><p>On the face of it, they all seem bewilderingly different. Some involve plucking or bowing a string, others involve blowing air through a tube, and still others involve pressing keys. As if this weren't enough, consider the difference in size between some of these instruments. A flute is small enough to be able to be carried comfortably in one hand, while a pipe organ may be so large that it has to be permanently installed in a spacious building like a church or concert hall. However, despite all these differences, there are some features that are common to all musical instruments. Here we shall examine the general principles of sound production that apply to all instruments.</p><p>Please note that <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-5.12#act001-021-000">Activity 21</a> and <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-5.12#act001-022-000">Activity 22</a> are optional and require additional materials and software.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract relevant to The Open University course TA212 <i>The technology of music</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses">subject area</a></span>.</p>
  • How do different instruments produce the sounds we classify as music? How do we decide whether something – a piano, a vacuum cleaner – is actually a musical instrument? In this unit we investigate the way vibrations and sound waves are harnessed to create music.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 01 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/engineering-and-technology/technology/creating-musical-sounds/content-section-0">Creating musical sounds</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011