Sustainable Scotland
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/t123_1
is a Unit , Document

Outgoing links

Property Object
subject There are 90 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Dataset OpenLearn
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Subject
Course t123
To t123
Relates to course t123
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2013-06-03T15:05:00.000Z
  • 2014-03-12T11:47:00.000Z
  • 2014-03-12T12:01:37.000Z
  • 2016-03-03T10:03:07.000Z
  • 2016-03-08T09:32:38.000Z
  • 2016-03-17T13:32:11.000Z
  • 2016-03-30T13:36:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-30T14:01:50.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Sustainable Scotland
Title Sustainable Scotland
Description
  • Sustainable Scotland is a free course that will appeal to anyone with an interest in a sustainable future in the context of contemporary Scottish society. It will give you a broad-based introduction to a number of different aspects of sustainability that impact on Scotland and the wider world. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 12 Mar 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0">Sustainable Scotland</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • This broad-based unit will introduce you to a number of different aspects of sustainability that impact on Scotland and the wider world. It wil appeal to anyone with an interest in a sustainable future in the context of contemporary Scottish society.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 03 Jun 2013 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0">Sustainable Scotland</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2013
  • Sustainable Scotland is a free course that will appeal to anyone with an interest in a sustainable future in the context of contemporary Scottish society. It will give you a broad-based introduction to a number of different aspects of sustainability that impact on Scotland and the wider world. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 30 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0">Sustainable Scotland</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • <p>This course takes you on a wide-ranging journey through the many aspects of sustainability and explores ways to tackle a sustainable future positively. We will look briefly at issues such as ecological footprinting, globalisation, recycling, food production, fishing, waste heat, nature and <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/glossary/showentry.php?eid=2998&amp;displayformat=dictionary" title="T123_1 Glossary: Culture" class="glossary autolink concept glossaryid28">culture</a>.</p><p>This course will appeal to anyone interested in learning more about a sustainable future, as well as those who are interested in contemporary Scottish society.</p><p>Understanding what is meant by the terms 'sustainability' and 'sustainable development' can be the first hurdle. Nearly all academic and popular science books on the environment talk about these terms without giving a clear definition. The Brundtland Commission (1987), or <i>Brundtland Report</i>, is often referred to and it states that sustainable development 'is development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs'.</p><p>Generally, two types of sustainability are spoken about: weak and strong (Dresner, 2002). Sustainability can also be seen in economic terms, including the idea of natural capital that was used in the <i>Brundtland Report</i> (Pearce et al, 1989). The underlying principle here being that if, for example, something is taken out of the earth, something else renewable must be substituted as compensation. The extreme of this idea would be not to take anything out of the earth at all, but that would perhaps be a little unrealistic. If there is no decline in natural capital, then the sustainability is seen as 'strong'. If natural capital can have human-made capital substituted, then that is regarded as 'weak' sustainability.</p><p>Attitudes to environmental issues are affected by people's beliefs and background. Often environmentalists are perceived as middle-class people who don't understand the economic situations of those whose livelihood depends on a particular industry. Take the fishing industry for example. Fishing quotas are seen by environmentalists as a chance for regeneration of fishing stock, whereas the fishing folk see it as unemployment and an economic decline in the local area. This particular issue is revisited again later in the course.</p><p>People who concentrate on the future of environmental resources for their children and grandchildren are said to have a 'green sustainability agenda'. Those who concentrate on the difficulties experienced by those currently living in a low-income socially-deprived area are said to have a 'brown environmental health agenda'.</p><p>There are almost as many perspectives on the environment as there are on political parties.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 1 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/environment-and-development?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Environment &amp; Development</a></span></p>
  • <p>This unit takes you on a wide-ranging journey through the many aspects of sustainability and explores ways to tackle a sustainable future positively. We will look briefly at issues such as ecological footprinting, globalisation, recycling, food production, fishing, waste heat, nature and <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/glossary/showentry.php?courseid=876&amp;eid=2998&amp;displayformat=dictionary" title="T123_1 Glossary: Culture" class="glossary autolink concept glossaryid28">culture</a>.</p><p>This unit will appeal to anyone interested in learning more about a sustainable future, as well as those who are interested in contemporary Scottish society.</p><p>Understanding what is meant by the terms 'sustainability' and 'sustainable development' can be the first hurdle. Nearly all academic and popular science books on the environment talk about these terms without giving a clear definition. The Brundtland Commission (1987), or <i>Brundtland Report</i>, is often referred to and it states that sustainable development &#x2018;is development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’.</p><p>Generally, two types of sustainability are spoken about: weak and strong (Dresner, 2002). Sustainability can also be seen in economic terms, including the idea of natural capital that was used in the <i>Brundtland Report</i> (Pearce et al, 1989). The underlying principle here being that if, for example, something is taken out of the earth, something else renewable must be substituted as compensation. The extreme of this idea would be not to take anything out of the earth at all, but that would perhaps be a little unrealistic. If there is no decline in natural capital, then the sustainability is seen as &#x2018;strong’. If natural capital can have human-made capital substituted, then that is regarded as &#x2018;weak’ sustainability.</p><p>Attitudes to environmental issues are affected by people’s beliefs and background. Often environmentalists are perceived as middle-class people who don’t understand the economic situations of those whose livelihood depends on a particular industry. Take the fishing industry for example. Fishing quotas are seen by environmentalists as a chance for regeneration of fishing stock, whereas the fishing folk see it as unemployment and an economic decline in the local area. This particular issue is revisited again later in the unit.</p><p>People who concentrate on the future of environmental resources for their children and grandchildren are said to have a &#x2018;green sustainability agenda’. Those who concentrate on the difficulties experienced by those currently living in a low-income socially-deprived area are said to have a &#x2018;brown environmental health agenda’.</p><p>There are almost as many perspectives on the environment as there are on political parties.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course T123 <i>Sustainable Scotland</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/computing-and-it/index.htm">subject area</a></span>.</p>
  • This broad-based unit will introduce you to a number of different aspects of sustainability that impact on Scotland and the wider world. It wil appeal to anyone with an interest in a sustainable future in the context of contemporary Scottish society.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 12 Mar 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/nature-environment/the-environment/environmental-decision-making/sustainable-scotland/content-section-0">Sustainable Scotland</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014