Hearing
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/sd329_1
is a Unit , Document

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Course sd329
To sd329
Relates to course sd329
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-05-31T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-05-31T11:11:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:52:22.000Z
  • 2016-03-29T14:01:31.000Z
  • 2016-03-31T15:02:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-31T15:32:21.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Hearing
Title Hearing
Description
  • <p>This course examines the basic mechanisms responsible for our ability to hear. Humans are able to distinguish a remarkable range of sounds and hearing provides us with a unique source of information about what is occurring in our immediate surroundings. Our sense of hearing depends entirely on the sensory receptors of the inner ear known as hair cells. Hair cells are extremely vulnerable and can be affected by disease, ageing and over-exposure to loud noise. Once destroyed, they do not regenerate. In this course we describe in detail the function of the cochlea, which is where the hair cells are located. We learn how sound energy is transduced into electrical signals and how a rapid-fire code of electrical impulses about the physical characteristics of a particular sound is sent to the brain. The brain interprets these signals as a musical phrase, a human voice or any of the range of sounds in the world around us at a particular moment. We also examine the central auditory nervous system pathways and describe the physiological mechanisms responsible for our sense of pitch and loudness and our ability to localise the source of a sound stimulus. Finally, we look at the main types of hearing impairment and their causes, effects and rehabilitation. </p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/sd329.htm">SD329<i> Signals and perception: the science of the senses</i></a></span>.</p>
  • <p>This course examines the basic mechanisms responsible for our ability to hear. Humans are able to distinguish a remarkable range of sounds and hearing provides us with a unique source of information about what is occurring in our immediate surroundings. Our sense of hearing depends entirely on the sensory receptors of the inner ear known as hair cells. Hair cells are extremely vulnerable and can be affected by disease, ageing and over-exposure to loud noise. Once destroyed, they do not regenerate. In this course we describe in detail the function of the cochlea, which is where the hair cells are located. We learn how sound energy is transduced into electrical signals and how a rapid-fire code of electrical impulses about the physical characteristics of a particular sound is sent to the brain. The brain interprets these signals as a musical phrase, a human voice or any of the range of sounds in the world around us at a particular moment. We also examine the central auditory nervous system pathways and describe the physiological mechanisms responsible for our sense of pitch and loudness and our ability to localise the source of a sound stimulus. Finally, we look at the main types of hearing impairment and their causes, effects and rehabilitation. </p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/sd329.htm?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;amp;MEDIA=ou">SD329<i> Signals and perception: the science of the senses</i></a></span>.</p>
  • <p>This unit examines the basic mechanisms responsible for our ability to hear. Humans are able to distinguish a remarkable range of sounds and hearing provides us with a unique source of information about what is occurring in our immediate surroundings. Our sense of hearing depends entirely on the sensory receptors of the inner ear known as hair cells. Hair cells are extremely vulnerable and can be affected by disease, ageing and over-exposure to loud noise. Once destroyed, they do not regenerate. In this unit we describe in detail the function of the cochlea, which is where the hair cells are located. We learn how sound energy is transduced into electrical signals and how a rapid-fire code of electrical impulses about the physical characteristics of a particular sound is sent to the brain. The brain interprets these signals as a musical phrase, a human voice or any of the range of sounds in the world around us at a particular moment. We also examine the central auditory nervous system pathways and describe the physiological mechanisms responsible for our sense of pitch and loudness and our ability to localise the source of a sound stimulus. Finally, we look at the main types of hearing impairment and their causes, effects and rehabilitation. </p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/sd329.htm"><i>Signals and perception: the science of the senses</i>(SD329)</a></span></p>
  • Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This free course will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This course will be best understood by those with some biological understanding. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/biology/hearing/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 31 May 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/biology/hearing/content-section-0">Hearing</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This free course will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This course will be best understood by those with some biological understanding. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/biology/hearing/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 31 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/biology/hearing/content-section-0">Hearing</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This unit will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences – and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This unit will be best understood by those with some biological understanding.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/biology/hearing/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 31 May 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/biology/hearing/content-section-0">Hearing</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University