Women in Science
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science
is a Article , Article , Podcast , Document

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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
source Women in Science
URL
  • http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science
  • women-science
Locator
  • http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science
  • women-science
See also
Language en-GB
ID 17744
From 201701?type=ole_podcast&page=4
Published
  • Sat, 05 Mar 2011 00:00:00 +0000
  • Tue, 08 Mar 2011 04:22:16 +0000
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Women in Science
Title Women in Science
Depiction ou_ats.jpg
Description
  • How have individual female scientists contributed to the advancement of science through time? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day (March 8th) and to mark International Year of Chemistry 2011, The Open University asked some of the female scientists currently working in its Faculty of Science, to nominate their personal choice of outstanding woman of science. The female scientists nominated include several Nobel Prize Laureates, such as Marie Curie, Dorothy Hodgkin and American geneticist, Barbara McClintock. The academics also talk about their own experiences of being a woman in the sciences today.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science">Women in Science</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2011
  • How have individual female scientists contributed to the advancement of science through time? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day (March 8th) and to mark International Year of Chemistry 2011, The Open University asked some of the female scientists currently working in its Faculty of Science, to nominate their personal choice of outstanding woman of science. The female scientists nominated include several Nobel Prize Laureates, such as Marie Curie, Dorothy Hodgkin and American geneticist, Barbara McClintock. The academics also talk about their own experiences of being a woman in the sciences today.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science">Women in Science</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2011
  • How have individual female scientists contributed to the advancement of science through time? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day (March 8th) and to mark International Year of Chemistry 2011, The Open University asked some of the female scientists currently working in its Faculty of Science, to nominate their personal choice of outstanding woman of science. The female scientists nominated include several Nobel Prize Laureates, such as Marie Curie, Dorothy Hodgkin and American geneticist, Barbara McClintock. The academics also talk about their own experiences of being a woman in the sciences today.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science">Women in Science</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2011
  • How have individual female scientists contributed to the advancement of science through time? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day (March 8th) and to mark International Year of Chemistry 2011, The Open University asked some of the female scientists currently working in its Faculty of Science, to nominate their personal choice of outstanding woman of science. The female scientists nominated include several Nobel Prize Laureates, such as Marie Curie, Dorothy Hodgkin and American geneticist, Barbara McClintock. The academics also talk about their own experiences of being a woman in the sciences today.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Sat, 05 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/women-science">Women in Science</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.