Global responses to Darwin's ideas
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas
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Subject There are 13 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
source Global responses to Darwin's ideas
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Language en-GB
ID 16888
From 201701?type=ole_podcast&page=3
Published
  • Sun, 08 Nov 2009 00:00:00 +0000
  • Wed, 04 Nov 2009 03:14:33 +0000
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Global responses to Darwin's ideas
Title Global responses to Darwin's ideas
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Description
  • How was Darwin initially received in Europe, and beyond? Why was he eagerly accepted in some countries and bitterly rejected in others? And how can modern media make him accessible to a much greater audience? History professors Thomas Glick and Peter Kjaergaard reveal the controversies, which occurred when Darwin's ideas were first published around the world. Immediately, they were interpreted through the lens of wider cultural and political debates, which very much affected their reception. Few doubted that Charles Darwin was a great naturalist, but there were many who argued with evolutionary theory and some who only accepted it after significant alterations. Today the Internet has created a vast new audience for Darwin, but this doesn't mean that all the arguments have gone away. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Wed, 04 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas">Global responses to Darwin&#039;s ideas</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2009
  • How was Darwin initially received in Europe, and beyond? Why was he eagerly accepted in some countries and bitterly rejected in others? And how can modern media make him accessible to a much greater audience? History professors Thomas Glick and Peter Kjaergaard reveal the controversies, which occurred when Darwin's ideas were first published around the world. Immediately, they were interpreted through the lens of wider cultural and political debates, which very much affected their reception. Few doubted that Charles Darwin was a great naturalist, but there were many who argued with evolutionary theory and some who only accepted it after significant alterations. Today the Internet has created a vast new audience for Darwin, but this doesn't mean that all the arguments have gone away. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Wed, 04 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas">Global responses to Darwin&#039;s ideas</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2009
  • How was Darwin initially received in Europe, and beyond? Why was he eagerly accepted in some countries and bitterly rejected in others? And how can modern media make him accessible to a much greater audience? History professors Thomas Glick and Peter Kjaergaard reveal the controversies, which occurred when Darwin's ideas were first published around the world. Immediately, they were interpreted through the lens of wider cultural and political debates, which very much affected their reception. Few doubted that Charles Darwin was a great naturalist, but there were many who argued with evolutionary theory and some who only accepted it after significant alterations. Today the Internet has created a vast new audience for Darwin, but this doesn't mean that all the arguments have gone away. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Sun, 08 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas">Global responses to Darwin&#039;s ideas</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.
  • How was Darwin initially received in Europe, and beyond? Why was he eagerly accepted in some countries and bitterly rejected in others? And how can modern media make him accessible to a much greater audience? History professors Thomas Glick and Peter Kjaergaard reveal the controversies, which occurred when Darwin's ideas were first published around the world. Immediately, they were interpreted through the lens of wider cultural and political debates, which very much affected their reception. Few doubted that Charles Darwin was a great naturalist, but there were many who argued with evolutionary theory and some who only accepted it after significant alterations. Today the Internet has created a vast new audience for Darwin, but this doesn't mean that all the arguments have gone away. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Wed, 04 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/global-responses-darwins-ideas">Global responses to Darwin&#039;s ideas</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2009