Evolution and the human family
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
source Evolution and the human family
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Language en-GB
ID 16924
From 201701?type=ole_podcast&page=3
Published
  • Thu, 01 Apr 2010 00:00:00 +0100
  • Thu, 01 Apr 2010 05:19:17 +0100
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
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Label Evolution and the human family
Title Evolution and the human family
Depiction ou_ats.jpg
Description
  • Can Darwin's theory of evolution be applied to cultural institutions like the family? If so, how can it help us to understand how family structures have evolved? If not, what are the limitations of a Darwinian approach? In this album, Ruth Mace, Professor of Evolutionary Biology at UCL in London, reveals how she uses a Darwinian approach to study diverse human populations. In particular, she focuses her discussion on family size, exploring how Darwinian concepts such as evolutionary trade-offs can help explain why modern families are getting smaller and smaller. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © The British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Thu, 01 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family">Evolution and the human family</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.
  • Can Darwin's theory of evolution be applied to cultural institutions like the family? If so, how can it help us to understand how family structures have evolved? If not, what are the limitations of a Darwinian approach? In this album, Ruth Mace, Professor of Evolutionary Biology at UCL in London, reveals how she uses a Darwinian approach to study diverse human populations. In particular, she focuses her discussion on family size, exploring how Darwinian concepts such as evolutionary trade-offs can help explain why modern families are getting smaller and smaller. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © The British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Thu, 01 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family">Evolution and the human family</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010
  • Can Darwin's theory of evolution be applied to cultural institutions like the family? If so, how can it help us to understand how family structures have evolved? If not, what are the limitations of a Darwinian approach? In this album, Ruth Mace, Professor of Evolutionary Biology at UCL in London, reveals how she uses a Darwinian approach to study diverse human populations. In particular, she focuses her discussion on family size, exploring how Darwinian concepts such as evolutionary trade-offs can help explain why modern families are getting smaller and smaller. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © The British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Thu, 01 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family">Evolution and the human family</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2010
  • Can Darwin's theory of evolution be applied to cultural institutions like the family? If so, how can it help us to understand how family structures have evolved? If not, what are the limitations of a Darwinian approach? In this album, Ruth Mace, Professor of Evolutionary Biology at UCL in London, reveals how she uses a Darwinian approach to study diverse human populations. In particular, she focuses her discussion on family size, exploring how Darwinian concepts such as evolutionary trade-offs can help explain why modern families are getting smaller and smaller. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © The British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Thu, 01 Apr 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/evolution-and-the-human-family">Evolution and the human family</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010