Darwinian Demons
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons
is a Article , Article , Podcast , Document

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subject There are 45 more objects.
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
source Darwinian Demons
Subject There are 11 more objects.
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URL
  • http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons
  • darwinian-demons
Locator
  • http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons
  • darwinian-demons
See also
Language en-GB
ID 16889
From 201701?type=ole_podcast&page=3
Published
  • Mon, 09 Nov 2009 00:00:00 +0000
  • Mon, 09 Nov 2009 02:22:30 +0000
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Darwinian Demons
Title Darwinian Demons
Depiction ou_ats.jpg
Description
  • Is 'natural selection' inimical to bio-diversity? Why is the natural world not dominated by a few 'super' species? And in the future, can the richness of nature be preserved? In this album, Jonathan Silvertown, Professor of Ecology at The Open University, explains how Darwinian theory uses the concept of niche specialisation to account for the diversity of flora and fauna on Earth. If it were not for environmental niches, Darwinian 'demons', might emerge, powerful species whose evolutionary fitness makes them all conquering. However, according to Darwin, the natural world is infinitely complex and inhabited by a multitude of different species, each of which is peculiarly adapted to its local environment. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons">Darwinian Demons</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2009
  • Is 'natural selection' inimical to bio-diversity? Why is the natural world not dominated by a few 'super' species? And in the future, can the richness of nature be preserved? In this album, Jonathan Silvertown, Professor of Ecology at The Open University, explains how Darwinian theory uses the concept of niche specialisation to account for the diversity of flora and fauna on Earth. If it were not for environmental niches, Darwinian 'demons', might emerge, powerful species whose evolutionary fitness makes them all conquering. However, according to Darwin, the natural world is infinitely complex and inhabited by a multitude of different species, each of which is peculiarly adapted to its local environment. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons">Darwinian Demons</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2009
  • Is 'natural selection' inimical to bio-diversity? Why is the natural world not dominated by a few 'super' species? And in the future, can the richness of nature be preserved? In this album, Jonathan Silvertown, Professor of Ecology at The Open University, explains how Darwinian theory uses the concept of niche specialisation to account for the diversity of flora and fauna on Earth. If it were not for environmental niches, Darwinian 'demons', might emerge, powerful species whose evolutionary fitness makes them all conquering. However, according to Darwin, the natural world is infinitely complex and inhabited by a multitude of different species, each of which is peculiarly adapted to its local environment. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons">Darwinian Demons</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.
  • Is 'natural selection' inimical to bio-diversity? Why is the natural world not dominated by a few 'super' species? And in the future, can the richness of nature be preserved? In this album, Jonathan Silvertown, Professor of Ecology at The Open University, explains how Darwinian theory uses the concept of niche specialisation to account for the diversity of flora and fauna on Earth. If it were not for environmental niches, Darwinian 'demons', might emerge, powerful species whose evolutionary fitness makes them all conquering. However, according to Darwin, the natural world is infinitely complex and inhabited by a multitude of different species, each of which is peculiarly adapted to its local environment. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © British Council 2009.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/across-the-sciences/darwinian-demons">Darwinian Demons</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2009