Future energy demand and supply
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/s278_19
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Dataset OpenLearn
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Course Earth's Physical Resources
To Earth's Physical Resources
Relates to course Earth's Physical Resources
Subject
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-27T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-27T10:21:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:59:25.000Z
  • 2014-07-22T16:01:33.000Z
  • 2014-07-30T15:02:24.000Z
  • 2014-08-01T15:33:04.000Z
  • 2014-08-19T09:32:24.000Z
  • 2016-03-02T10:33:30.000Z
  • 2016-03-07T13:05:09.000Z
  • 2016-03-16T15:03:22.000Z
  • 2016-03-22T10:55:00.000Z
  • [...]
There are 1 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Future energy demand and supply
Title Future energy demand and supply
Description
  • <p>Human demand for energy has only quite recently exceeded the relatively modest amounts available locally: wind and water power, wood or dung for heat. Since the mid-19th century, expansion in the large-scale exploitation of cheap, plentiful, concentrated energy sources &#x2014; the fossil fuels &#x2014; has outstripped global population growth (Figure 1). </p><div class="oucontent-figure" style="width:478px;" id="fig006_001"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/66117/mod_oucontent/oucontent/458/ae9ae8fb/069fd470/s278_19_6_fig001.jpg" alt="" width="478" height="416"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption"><b>Figure 1</b> Population growth and global primary energy consumption from 1850 to 2000.</span></div></div></div><p>When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. This final chapter examines how future global energy consumption might develop from its current level, and summarises the main influences on that development, including economic, environmental and technological factors.</p><p>This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Earth's physical resources: origin, use and environmental impact (S278) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/science/environmental-science/index.htm">this subject area</a></span>.</p><div class="oucontent-box oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box &#10; oucontent-s-noheading&#10; "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><p>The Open University is conducting a survey investigating how people use the free educational content. The aim is to provide a better free learning experience for everyone. If you have 10 minutes to spare, we’d be delighted if you could take part and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9G5JS2Y"><b>tell us what you think</b></a>.&#xA0;Please note this will take you out of OpenLearn, we suggest you open this in a new tab by right clicking on the link and choosing open in a new tab.</p></div></div></div>
  • <p>Human demand for energy has only quite recently exceeded the relatively modest amounts available locally: wind and water power, wood or dung for heat. Since the mid-19th century, expansion in the large-scale exploitation of cheap, plentiful, concentrated energy sources &#x2014; the fossil fuels &#x2014; has outstripped global population growth (Figure 1). </p><div class="oucontent-figure" style="width:478px;" id="fig006_001"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/66117/mod_oucontent/oucontent/458/ae9ae8fb/069fd470/s278_19_6_fig001.jpg" alt="" width="478" height="416" style="max-width:478px;" class="oucontent-figure-image oucontent-media-wide"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption"><b>Figure 1</b> Population growth and global primary energy consumption from 1850 to 2000.</span></div></div></div><p>When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. This final chapter examines how future global energy consumption might develop from its current level, and summarises the main influences on that development, including economic, environmental and technological factors.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/science?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Science</a></span></p>
  • <p>Human demand for energy has only quite recently exceeded the relatively modest amounts available locally: wind and water power, wood or dung for heat. Since the mid-19th century, expansion in the large-scale exploitation of cheap, plentiful, concentrated energy sources &#x2014; the fossil fuels &#x2014; has outstripped global population growth (Figure 1). </p><div class="oucontent-figure" style="width:478px;" id="fig006_001"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/66117/mod_oucontent/oucontent/458/ae9ae8fb/069fd470/s278_19_6_fig001.jpg" alt="" width="478" height="416"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption"><b>Figure 1</b> Population growth and global primary energy consumption from 1850 to 2000.</span></div></div></div><p>When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. This final chapter examines how future global energy consumption might develop from its current level, and summarises the main influences on that development, including economic, environmental and technological factors.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/science?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Science</a></span></p>
  • When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th Century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. Future energy demand and supply is a free course that offers an introduction to how this is being undertaken. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/future-energy-demand-and-supply/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/future-energy-demand-and-supply/content-section-0">Future energy demand and supply</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • <p>Human demand for energy has only quite recently exceeded the relatively modest amounts available locally: wind and water power, wood or dung for heat. Since the mid-19th century, expansion in the large-scale exploitation of cheap, plentiful, concentrated energy sources &#x2014; the fossil fuels &#x2014; has outstripped global population growth (Figure 1). </p><div class="oucontent-figure" style="width:478px;" id="fig006_001"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/66117/mod_oucontent/oucontent/458/s278_19_6_fig001.jpg" alt="" width="478" height="416"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption"><b>Figure 1</b> Population growth and global primary energy consumption from 1850 to 2000.</span></div></div></div><p>When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. This final chapter examines how future global energy consumption might develop from its current level, and summarises the main influences on that development, including economic, environmental and technological factors.</p><p>This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Earth's physical resources: origin, use and environmental impact (S278) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/science/environmental-science/index.htm">this subject area</a></span>.</p>
  • <p>Human demand for energy has only quite recently exceeded the relatively modest amounts available locally: wind and water power, wood or dung for heat. Since the mid-19th century, expansion in the large-scale exploitation of cheap, plentiful, concentrated energy sources &#x2014; the fossil fuels &#x2014; has outstripped global population growth (Figure 1). </p><div class="oucontent-figure" style="width:478px;" id="fig006_001"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/66117/mod_oucontent/oucontent/458/ae9ae8fb/069fd470/s278_19_6_fig001.jpg" alt="" width="478" height="416"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption"><b>Figure 1</b> Population growth and global primary energy consumption from 1850 to 2000.</span></div></div></div><p>When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. This final chapter examines how future global energy consumption might develop from its current level, and summarises the main influences on that development, including economic, environmental and technological factors.</p><p>This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Earth's physical resources: origin, use and environmental impact (S278) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/science/environmental-science/index.htm">this subject area</a></span>.</p>
  • When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th Century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. Future energy demand and supply is a free course that offers an introduction to how this is being undertaken. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/future-energy-demand-and-supply/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/future-energy-demand-and-supply/content-section-0">Future energy demand and supply</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th Century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/future-energy-demand-and-supply/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/future-energy-demand-and-supply/content-section-0">Future energy demand and supply</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>Human demand for energy has only quite recently exceeded the relatively modest amounts available locally: wind and water power, wood or dung for heat. Since the mid-19th century, expansion in the large-scale exploitation of cheap, plentiful, concentrated energy sources &#x2014; the fossil fuels &#x2014; has outstripped global population growth (Figure 1). </p><div class="oucontent-figure" style="width:478px;" id="fig006_001"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/66117/mod_oucontent/oucontent/458/ae9ae8fb/069fd470/s278_19_6_fig001.jpg" alt="" width="478" height="416"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption"><b>Figure 1</b> Population growth and global primary energy consumption from 1850 to 2000.</span></div></div></div><p>When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. This final chapter examines how future global energy consumption might develop from its current level, and summarises the main influences on that development, including economic, environmental and technological factors.</p><p>This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Earth's physical resources: origin, use and environmental impact (S278) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/science/environmental-science/index.htm">this subject area</a></span>.</p><div class="oucontent-box oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box &#10; oucontent-s-noheading&#10; "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><p>The Open University is conducting a survey investigating how people use the free educational content. The aim is to provide a better free learning experience for everyone. If you have 10 minutes to spare, we’d be delighted if you could take part and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/M2BFMJJ"><b>tell us what you think</b></a>.&#xA0;</p></div></div></div>