Global water resources
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/s278_18
is a Unit , Document

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URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-03-23T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-03-23T12:58:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:47:41.000Z
  • 2016-03-02T10:33:30.000Z
  • 2016-03-07T13:05:08.000Z
  • 2016-03-16T14:44:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-16T15:03:20.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Global water resources
Title Global water resources
Description
  • <p>The amount of water used on a global scale has increased rapidly in recent years. Increased demand is due to population growth and increased per capita consumption of water. The rate of increase in industrialised countries is the lowest; most of the increase is in the developing world, which has a much lower per capita water use at present: 70% of global water use is for agriculture, 22% for industry and 8% for domestic purposes. This division has a considerable regional variation: in Africa, India and Asia, agriculture is even more water-demanding, with Asia, for example, using 85% for agriculture. In Europe and the USA, industry uses a greater proportion: 55% and 49% respectively. </p><p>Water, however, is a resource in which 'used' is a relative term: some agricultural water and most industrial and domestic water is returned to rivers or groundwater after use, but usually with a change of quality. And, we have seen that rivers themselves have a <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/glossary/showentry.php?eid=1608&amp;displayformat=dictionary" title="S278_18 Glossary: Residence time" class="glossary autolink concept glossaryid14">residence time</a> of only a few weeks, so the water in them is renewed on a very short timescale.</p><p>On a global scale, water is not scarce, but locally on a continental or national scale it often is, and with increasing demand is likely to be more so in the future.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/environment-and-development?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Environment &amp; Development</a></span></p>
  • Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. This free course, Global water resources, examines the options. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/global-water-resources/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/global-water-resources/content-section-0">Global water resources</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. This free course, Global water resources, examines the options. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/global-water-resources/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 23 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/global-water-resources/content-section-0">Global water resources</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/global-water-resources/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 23 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/environmental-science/global-water-resources/content-section-0">Global water resources</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>The amount of water used on a global scale has increased rapidly in recent years. Increased demand is due to population growth and increased per capita consumption of water. The rate of increase in industrialised countries is the lowest; most of the increase is in the developing world, which has a much lower per capita water use at present: 70% of global water use is for agriculture, 22% for industry and 8% for domestic purposes. This division has a considerable regional variation: in Africa, India and Asia, agriculture is even more water-demanding, with Asia, for example, using 85% for agriculture. In Europe and the USA, industry uses a greater proportion: 55% and 49% respectively. </p><p>Water, however, is a resource in which &#x2018;used’ is a relative term: some agricultural water and most industrial and domestic water is returned to rivers or groundwater after use, but usually with a change of quality. And, we have seen that rivers themselves have a <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/glossary/showentry.php?courseid=450&amp;eid=1608&amp;displayformat=dictionary" title="S278_18 Glossary: Residence time" class="glossary autolink concept glossaryid14">residence time</a> of only a few weeks, so the water in them is renewed on a very short timescale.</p><p>On a global scale, water is not scarce, but locally on a continental or national scale it often is, and with increasing demand is likely to be more so in the future.</p><p>This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Earth's physical resources: origin, use and environmental impact (S278) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/science/environmental-science/index.htm">this subject area</a></span>.</p>
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Course Earth's Physical Resources
To Earth's Physical Resources
Relates to course Earth's Physical Resources
Dataset OpenLearn