Maths for Science
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/s151_1
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
Subject
Course s151
To s151
Relates to course s151
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-21T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-21T13:32:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T19:08:52.000Z
  • 2016-03-02T09:02:42.000Z
  • 2016-03-07T11:59:30.000Z
  • 2016-03-16T14:02:41.000Z
  • 2016-03-22T13:19:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-22T13:27:14.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Maths for Science
Title Maths for Science
Description
  • Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisions to be made about how the results are to be represented, what units of measurements will be used and the precision to which the measurements will be made. In this unit we will consider these points in turn.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics-education/maths-science/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 21 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics-education/maths-science/content-section-0">Maths for Science</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>The course that follows presents two sections from different parts of the Maths for Science teaching text - a course designed to help OU students acquire the knowledge and skills to tackle the mathematical aspects of science courses they are likely to go on to study. The first (Section 1), covering the first six of the learning outcomes, is about measurement. Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisions to be made about how the results are to be represented, what units of measurements will be used and the precision to which the measurements will be made. The second selection from the course (Section 2) is about probability and descriptive statistics, where you will learn something of the statistical techniques that are used to make sense of data of the type often gathered from measurements of the type discussed in Section 1.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course s151 <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/s151.htm?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;amp;MEDIA=ou"><i>Maths for Science</i></a></span>.</p>
  • Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisions to be made about how the results are to be represented, what courses of measurements will be used and the precision to which the measurements will be made. In this free course, Maths for Science, we will consider these points in turn.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics-education/maths-science/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics-education/maths-science/content-section-0">Maths for Science</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • <p>The unit that follows presents two sections from different parts of the Maths for Science teaching text – a course designed to help OU students acquire the knowledge and skills to tackle the mathematical aspects of science courses they are likely to go on to study. The first (Section 1), covering the first six of the learning outcomes, is about measurement. Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisions to be made about how the results are to be represented, what units of measurements will be used and the precision to which the measurements will be made. The second selection from the course (Section 2) is about probability and descriptive statistics, where you will learn something of the statistical techniques that are used to make sense of data of the type often gathered from measurements of the type discussed in Section 1.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/s151.htm"><i>Maths for science</i> (S151)</a></span></p>
  • Observation, measurement and the recording of data are central activities in science. Speculation and the development of new theories are crucial as well, but ultimately the predictions resulting from those theories have to be tested against what actually happens and this can only be done by making further measurements. Whether measurements are made using simple instruments such as rulers and thermometers, or involve sophisticated devices such as electron microscopes or lasers, there are decisions to be made about how the results are to be represented, what courses of measurements will be used and the precision to which the measurements will be made. In this free course, Maths for Science, we will consider these points in turn.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics-education/maths-science/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 21 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics-education/maths-science/content-section-0">Maths for Science</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011