Roman funerary monuments
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/roman-funerary-monuments
is a Unit , Document

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Subject There are 6 more objects.
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URL roman-funerary-monuments
Locator roman-funerary-monuments
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2009-11-09T02:06:00.000Z
  • 2009-11-09T02:06:30.000Z
  • 2009-11-10T00:00:00.000Z
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Roman funerary monuments
Title Roman funerary monuments
Description
  • How and what can we learn from fragments? Thousands of fragmented inscriptions survive from the ancient city of Rome, the majority of which are funerary inscriptions or epitaphs from tombs. This album looks at the impact of funerary monuments. From the Mausoleum of Emperor Augustus, to the more humble tombs of freed slaves, these monuments reveal a great deal about the people and families commemorated. Examining the type, scale, location, decoration, and epitaph of each tomb allows us to build up a detailed picture of a life lived thousands of years ago. This material forms part of The Open University course A219 Exploring the classical world.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments">Roman funerary monuments</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2009
  • How and what can we learn from fragments? Thousands of fragmented inscriptions survive from the ancient city of Rome, the majority of which are funerary inscriptions or epitaphs from tombs. This album looks at the impact of funerary monuments. From the Mausoleum of Emperor Augustus, to the more humble tombs of freed slaves, these monuments reveal a great deal about the people and families commemorated. Examining the type, scale, location, decoration, and epitaph of each tomb allows us to build up a detailed picture of a life lived thousands of years ago. This material forms part of The Open University course A219 Exploring the classical world.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Tue, 10 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments">Roman funerary monuments</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.
  • How and what can we learn from fragments? Thousands of fragmented inscriptions survive from the ancient city of Rome, the majority of which are funerary inscriptions or epitaphs from tombs. This album looks at the impact of funerary monuments. From the Mausoleum of Emperor Augustus, to the more humble tombs of freed slaves, these monuments reveal a great deal about the people and families commemorated. Examining the type, scale, location, decoration, and epitaph of each tomb allows us to build up a detailed picture of a life lived thousands of years ago. This material forms part of The Open University course A219 Exploring the classical world.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments">Roman funerary monuments</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2009
  • How and what can we learn from fragments? Thousands of fragmented inscriptions survive from the ancient city of Rome, the majority of which are funerary inscriptions or epitaphs from tombs. This album looks at the impact of funerary monuments. From the Mausoleum of Emperor Augustus, to the more humble tombs of freed slaves, these monuments reveal a great deal about the people and families commemorated. Examining the type, scale, location, decoration, and epitaph of each tomb allows us to build up a detailed picture of a life lived thousands of years ago. This material forms part of The Open University course A219 Exploring the classical world.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments">Roman funerary monuments</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2009
  • How and what can we learn from fragments? Thousands of fragmented inscriptions survive from the ancient city of Rome, the majority of which are funerary inscriptions or epitaphs from tombs. This album looks at the impact of funerary monuments. From the Mausoleum of&nbsp;Emperor Augustus, to the more humble tombs of freed slaves, these monuments reveal a great&nbsp;deal about the people and&nbsp;families commemorated.&nbsp;Examining the&nbsp;type, scale, location, decoration, and epitaph of each tomb allows us to build up a detailed picture of a life&nbsp;lived thousands of years ago.&nbsp;This material forms part of The Open University course A219 Exploring the classical world. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Mon, 09 Nov 2009 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/roman-funerary-monuments">Roman funerary monuments</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2009
subject There are 19 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn