Can the way research is reported play into sexist assumptions?
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/can-the-way-research-reported-play-sexist-assumptions
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
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created Fri, 15 Apr 2016 16:23:00 +0100
Published Fri, 15 Apr 2016 16:23:00 +0100
modified Fri, 15 Apr 2016 16:23:00 +0100
Language en-GB
Large AV2ivsz
Small brain_ats.jpg
Depiction brain_ats.jpg
ID 347538
From 201607?type=ole_article&page=9
Term Sociology
Term
  • Biology
  • Psychology
tag
  • brain
  • gender
  • prejudice
  • stereotypes
  • human biology
  • neuroscience
  • sexism
  • neuroimaging
  • research methodology
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
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Label Can the way research is reported play into sexist assumptions?
Title Can the way research is reported play into sexist assumptions?
Description
  • The way much research on sexual differentiation is conducted and communicated has come under intense criticism from scholars in both the natural and social sciences. Cliodhna O’Connor describes how traditional gender stereotypes are projected onto scientific information and its subsequent reporting. But the dynamics of online spaces have also facilitated more nuanced debate about the social implications of research, and its potential to perpetuate inequalities. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/can-the-way-research-reported-play-sexist-assumptions" /> Dr. Cliodhna O’Connor. Dr. Cliodhna O’Connor is a postdoctoral researcher in social psychology at UCL. Her research explores how scientific knowledge travels through wider society, and its implications for social identities​, public attitudes and common-sense beliefs.<br />First published on Fri, 15 Apr 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/can-the-way-research-reported-play-sexist-assumptions">Can the way research is reported play into sexist assumptions?</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY 4.0 2016
  • The way much research on sexual differentiation is conducted and communicated has come under intense criticism from scholars in both the natural and social sciences. Cliodhna O’Connor describes how traditional gender stereotypes are projected onto scientific information and its subsequent reporting. But the dynamics of online spaces have also facilitated more nuanced debate about the social implications of research, and its potential to perpetuate inequalities.