Buddhist Economics
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics
is a Article , Article , Podcast , Document

Outgoing links

Property Object
subject There are 27 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Subject There are 8 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset
source Buddhist Economics
URL
  • http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics
  • buddhist-economics
Locator
  • http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics
  • buddhist-economics
See also
Language en-GB
ID 16701
From 201701?type=ole_podcast
Published
  • Mon, 29 Mar 2010 00:00:00 +0100
  • Tue, 09 Mar 2010 13:24:09 +0000
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Buddhist Economics
Title Buddhist Economics
Depiction ou_ats.jpg
Description
  • In the world of economics, does a person’s well-being really matter? What is more important, social objectives or profit maximisation – or are they even compatible? During a trip to Burma in 1955, Ernest Schumacher pioneered the concept of Buddhist Economics, a set of principles based on the belief that the function of business is to supply goods and services for need and true well-being. Schumacher argued that Buddhist Economics could serve as a vehicle for human development to overcome self centeredness and augment human creativity and knowledge. Presented by Dr Mike Lucas from The Open University Business School and Alan Shipman from the Department of Economics at The Open University.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Tue, 09 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics">Buddhist Economics</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010
  • In the world of economics, does a person’s well-being really matter? What is more important, social objectives or profit maximisation – or are they even compatible? During a trip to Burma in 1955, Ernest Schumacher pioneered the concept of Buddhist Economics, a set of principles based on the belief that the function of business is to supply goods and services for need and true well-being. Schumacher argued that Buddhist Economics could serve as a vehicle for human development to overcome self centeredness and augment human creativity and knowledge. Presented by Dr Mike Lucas from The Open University Business School and Alan Shipman from the Department of Economics at The Open University.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Tue, 09 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics">Buddhist Economics</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2010
  • In the world of economics, does a person’s well-being really matter? What is more important, social objectives or profit maximisation – or are they even compatible? During a trip to Burma in 1955, Ernest Schumacher pioneered the concept of Buddhist Economics, a set of principles based on the belief that the function of business is to supply goods and services for need and true well-being. Schumacher argued that Buddhist Economics could serve as a vehicle for human development to overcome self centeredness and augment human creativity and knowledge. Presented by Dr Mike Lucas from The Open University Business School and Alan Shipman from the Department of Economics at The Open University.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Tue, 09 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics">Buddhist Economics</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010
  • In the world of economics, does a person’s well-being really matter? What is more important, social objectives or profit maximisation – or are they even compatible? During a trip to Burma in 1955, Ernest Schumacher pioneered the concept of Buddhist Economics, a set of principles based on the belief that the function of business is to supply goods and services for need and true well-being. Schumacher argued that Buddhist Economics could serve as a vehicle for human development to overcome self centeredness and augment human creativity and knowledge. Presented by Dr Mike Lucas from The Open University Business School and Alan Shipman from the Department of Economics at The Open University.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Mon, 29 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/buddhist-economics">Buddhist Economics</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.