Egyptian mathematics
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/ma290_1
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Subject
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Course Topics in the history of mathematics
To Topics in the history of mathematics
Relates to course Topics in the history of mathematics
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-06-13T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-06-13T13:41:00.000Z
  • 2011-06-13T14:41:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:54:19.000Z
  • 2016-02-25T12:37:55.000Z
  • 2016-03-15T15:01:38.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Egyptian mathematics
Title Egyptian mathematics
Description
  • <p>For many centuries, ancient Egypt was seen as the source of wisdom and knowledge, about mathematics as well as other things. There was a long classical Greek tradition to this effect, and in later centuries the indecipherability of the hieroglyphs did nothing to dispel this belief. But since the early nineteenth century, when the deciphering of the Rosetta Stone by Young and Champollion enabled rapid progress to be made in translating extant Egyptian texts, the picture has changed to reveal a civilisation more pragmatic and down-to-earth. In this unit, we shall investigate what we now know of Egyptian mathematics, and how we know it.</p><p>This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Topics in the history of mathematics (MA290) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics/index.htm">this subject area</a></span>.</p>
  • The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This unit looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics/egyptian-mathematics/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 13 Jun 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics/egyptian-mathematics/content-section-0">Egyptian mathematics</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>For many centuries, ancient Egypt was seen as the source of wisdom and knowledge, about mathematics as well as other things. There was a long classical Greek tradition to this effect, and in later centuries the indecipherability of the hieroglyphs did nothing to dispel this belief. But since the early nineteenth century, when the deciphering of the Rosetta Stone by Young and Champollion enabled rapid progress to be made in translating extant Egyptian texts, the picture has changed to reveal a civilisation more pragmatic and down-to-earth. In this course, we shall investigate what we now know of Egyptian mathematics, and how we know it.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 3 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/mathematics?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Mathematics</a></span></p>
  • <p>For many centuries, ancient Egypt was seen as the source of wisdom and knowledge, about mathematics as well as other things. There was a long classical Greek tradition to this effect, and in later centuries the indecipherability of the hieroglyphs did nothing to dispel this belief. But since the early nineteenth century, when the deciphering of the Rosetta Stone by Young and Champollion enabled rapid progress to be made in translating extant Egyptian texts, the picture has changed to reveal a civilisation more pragmatic and down-to-earth. In this course, we shall investigate what we now know of Egyptian mathematics, and how we know it.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 2 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/mathematics?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Mathematics</a></span></p>
  • The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This free course, Egyptian mathematics, looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics/egyptian-mathematics/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 13 Jun 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/mathematics-and-statistics/mathematics/egyptian-mathematics/content-section-0">Egyptian mathematics</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011