Machines, minds and computers
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/m366_1
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
Course m366
To m366
Relates to course m366
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-04-21T12:28:00.000Z
  • 2011-04-26T15:37:00.000Z
  • 2011-04-26T16:37:00.000Z
  • 2014-03-06T09:01:32.000Z
  • 2014-04-14T14:52:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-16T13:01:58.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Machines, minds and computers
Title Machines, minds and computers
Description
  • Computers are becoming smarter and may soon become intelligent. This unit looks at what “intelligence” is, how computers may become so, and whether they ever will really be intelligent. It is aimed at for people interested in understanding what “intelligence” and “thinking” really are, and who want to understand the underpinnings of our ideas about them.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 21 Apr 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0">Machines, minds and computers</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <div class="oucontent-quote oucontent-s-box"><blockquote><p>The real question is not whether machines think but whether men do.</p></blockquote><div class="oucontent-source-reference">B. F. Skinner, <i>Contingencies of Reinforcement </i>(1969)</div></div><p>In this unit I want to offer you a panoramic view of the intellectual background to the ideas we're going to cover. There are four principal sections – 'Machines', 'Minds', 'AI' and 'Computers' – framed by this introduction and some conclusions and reflections.</p><p>Briefly, this is the ground I want to cover:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li><i>Machines. </i>In this section we'll look at the history of humanity's engagement with machine technologies and at our dream of building machines that share our special human features and powers – particularly our mental abilities.</li><li><i>Minds. </i>Here, we'll explore the development of the idea that human thought might be a form of computation, from its origins in the 17th century, through the advent of the digital computer in the 20th, and into the Cybernetics and Symbolic AI movements of the recent past and the present.</li><li><i>AI</i><i>. </i>In this section we'll examine the birth and intellectual foundations of Symbolic AI and contrast it with the Cybernetic approach. We will also look at the distinction between <i>strong </i>and <i>weak artificial intelligence.</i></li><li><i>Computers. </i>Almost all of us have some experience of working with computers. Most of us probably feel confident we know what they are, and what they can do. In this section we'll examine the fundamental concept of the digital computer as an <i>interpreted automatic formal system </i>and consider the implications of this for computational theories of mind.</li></ul><p>At the end, I'll try to draw some conclusions and set the scene for the unit ahead. Some of the material in the unit is historical, some technical – all of it is relevant to the theme of this unit: humanity's quest to build intelligent machines.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/m366.htm">Natural and artificial intelligence (M366).</a></span></p>
  • Computers are becoming smarter and may soon become intelligent. This unit looks at what “intelligence” is, how computers may become so, and whether they ever will really be intelligent. It is aimed at for people interested in understanding what “intelligence” and “thinking” really are, and who want to understand the underpinnings of our ideas about them.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 26 Apr 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0">Machines, minds and computers</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Computers are becoming smarter and may soon become intelligent. This free course, Machines, minds and computers, looks at what intelligence is, how computers may become so, and whether they ever will really be intelligent. It is aimed at people interested in understanding what intelligence and thinking really are, and who want to understand the underpinnings of our ideas about them.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 14 Apr 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0">Machines, minds and computers</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <div class="oucontent-quote oucontent-s-box"><blockquote><p>The real question is not whether machines think but whether men do.</p></blockquote><div class="oucontent-source-reference">B. F. Skinner, <i>Contingencies of Reinforcement </i>(1969)</div></div><p>In this course I want to offer you a panoramic view of the intellectual background to the ideas we're going to cover. There are four principal sections – 'Machines', 'Minds', 'AI' and 'Computers' – framed by this introduction and some conclusions and reflections.</p><p>Briefly, this is the ground I want to cover:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li><i>Machines. </i>In this section we'll look at the history of humanity's engagement with machine technologies and at our dream of building machines that share our special human features and powers – particularly our mental abilities.</li><li><i>Minds. </i>Here, we'll explore the development of the idea that human thought might be a form of computation, from its origins in the 17th century, through the advent of the digital computer in the 20th, and into the Cybernetics and Symbolic AI movements of the recent past and the present.</li><li><i>AI</i><i>. </i>In this section we'll examine the birth and intellectual foundations of Symbolic AI and contrast it with the Cybernetic approach. We will also look at the distinction between <i>strong </i>and <i>weak artificial intelligence.</i></li><li><i>Computers. </i>Almost all of us have some experience of working with computers. Most of us probably feel confident we know what they are, and what they can do. In this section we'll examine the fundamental concept of the digital computer as an <i>interpreted automatic formal system </i>and consider the implications of this for computational theories of mind.</li></ul><p>At the end, I'll try to draw some conclusions and set the scene for the course ahead. Some of the material in the course is historical, some technical – all of it is relevant to the theme of this course: humanity's quest to build intelligent machines.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 3 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/computing-and-ict?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Computing &amp; ICT</a></span></p>
  • Computers are becoming smarter and may soon become intelligent. This free course, Machines, minds and computers, looks at what intelligence is, how computers may become so, and whether they ever will really be intelligent. It is aimed at people interested in understanding what intelligence and thinking really are, and who want to understand the underpinnings of our ideas about them.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 26 Apr 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/computing/machines-minds-and-computers/content-section-0">Machines, minds and computers</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011