Modelling object-oriented software – an introduction
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/m256_1
is a Unit , Document

Outgoing links

Property Object
subject There are 74 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Dataset OpenLearn
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Subject
Course m256
To m256
Relates to course m256
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-29T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-29T12:31:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-29T13:35:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T19:02:52.000Z
  • 2016-02-22T12:32:42.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Modelling object-oriented software – an introduction
Title Modelling object-oriented software – an introduction
Description
  • How do you model a software system? This unit will help you to work through the processes necessary to produce a conceptual model, by analysing the requirements document to identify classes and associations appropriate for modelling the system domain, together with their respective attributes and multiplicities.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/modelling-object-oriented-software-introduction/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/modelling-object-oriented-software-introduction/content-section-0">Modelling object-oriented software – an introduction</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>This material introduces the first steps in modelling a software system. Software development is made up of phases, which are often organised into cycles. The first of these phases is requirements specification. In this particular unit you will explore how to analyse the requirements document (the output from the requirements specification phase) to arrive at an understanding of how the proposed software system will be structured.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/m256.htm"><i>Software development with Java</i> (M256)</a></span>.</p>
  • <p>This material introduces the first steps in modelling a software system. Software development is made up of phases, which are often organised into cycles. The first of these phases is requirements specification. In this particular course you will explore how to analyse the requirements document (the output from the requirements specification phase) to arrive at an understanding of how the proposed software system will be structured.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/m256.htm?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">M256 <i>Software development with Java</i></a></span>.</p>
  • How do you model a software system? This free course, Modelling object-oriented software an introduction, will help you to work through the processes necessary to produce a conceptual model, by analysing the requirements document to identify classes and associations appropriate for modelling the system domain, together with their respective attributes and multiplicities.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/modelling-object-oriented-software-introduction/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/computing-and-ict/modelling-object-oriented-software-introduction/content-section-0">Modelling object-oriented software – an introduction</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011