The limits of primary care
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/k100_5
is a Unit , Document

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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Subject
Course Understanding health and social care
To Understanding health and social care
Relates to course Understanding health and social care
Dataset OpenLearn
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-03-31T08:45:00.000Z
  • 2011-03-31T09:45:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:49:26.000Z
  • 2016-02-10T10:23:00.000Z
  • 2016-02-10T10:31:39.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label The limits of primary care
Title The limits of primary care
Description
  • In this unit we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/nursing/the-limits-primary-care/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 31 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/nursing/the-limits-primary-care/content-section-0">The limits of primary care</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>In this unit we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.</p><p>This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from <i>Understanding Health and Social Care</i> (K100) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/health-and-social-care/index.htm"> subject area</a></span>. </p>
  • <p>In this course we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/health-and-social-care?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Health and Social Care</a></span>.</p>
  • In this free course, The limits of primary care, we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/nursing/the-limits-primary-care/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 10 Feb 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/nursing/the-limits-primary-care/content-section-0">The limits of primary care</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • In this free course, The limits of primary care, we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/nursing/the-limits-primary-care/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 31 Mar 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/nursing/the-limits-primary-care/content-section-0">The limits of primary care</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011