The interplay between leading and learning
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/e855_1
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
Course e855
To e855
Relates to course e855
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2012-05-18T10:10:00.000Z
  • 2012-05-18T11:10:00.000Z
  • 2014-04-16T15:01:33.000Z
  • 2016-01-28T15:04:04.000Z
  • 2016-02-17T14:02:27.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label The interplay between leading and learning
Title The interplay between leading and learning
Description
  • <p>Leadership in learning settings, from formal schooling and training to informal voluntary organisations, has several dimensions. There is the leadership defined by the role of a person such as a headteacher, director or co-ordinator –&#xA0;positional leadership.&#xA0;Positional leadership in this sense does not imply being in any specific part of the hierarchy. Rather, it comes from having been appointed to a particular role or responsibility. And so headteachers have positional leadership through their role, but so can an ordinary member of staff who is allocated the lead in a particular development or activity: a headteacher has a formal leadership role; others adopt informal ones.</p><p>Then there is the leadership of the teacher, youth worker, trainer or adult in charge that comes from the way they work with others, rather than through their formal role – what might be termed as&#xA0;opportunistic leadership&#xA0;– taking on leadership opportunistically. It is this type of leadership that we focus more on here. In considering these roles we need to look at the relationship between the how people &#x2018;lead’ and how those they are working with &#x2018;learn’. Of course, these are not mutually exclusive. In &#x2018;leading’ one is also &#x2018;learning’. Harris (2009) considers this interplay, summarising the literature and research around teachers-as-leaders. </p><p>As a consequence of this interplay of leadership and learning, there is a complex set of interactions between those involved – for example, teachers and pupils, trainers and trainees, youth workers and young people. Roles are blurred and learning does not take place solely because of any fixed relationship between roles. This course explores this interplay and interactions.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/course/e855.htm?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ol">E855 <i>Leading Professional Practice in Education</i></a></span>.</p>
  • Leadership in learning contexts is not confined to those who have it as part of their job title. Everyone has opportunities for leading - be it of learners, of colleagues in curriculum or project development, or more formally. Everyone also has the opportunity for learning. This unit explores the interplay between leadership and learning.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/the-interplay-between-leading-and-learning/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 18 May 2012 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/the-interplay-between-leading-and-learning/content-section-0">The interplay between leading and learning</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2012
  • <p>Leadership in learning settings, from formal schooling and training to informal voluntary organisations, has several dimensions. There is the leadership defined by the role of a person such as a headteacher, director or co-ordinator –&#xA0;positional leadership.&#xA0;Positional leadership in this sense does not imply being in any specific part of the hierarchy. Rather, it comes from having been appointed to a particular role or responsibility. And so headteachers have positional leadership through their role, but so can an ordinary member of staff who is allocated the lead in a particular development or activity: a headteacher has a formal leadership role; others adopt informal ones.</p><p>Then there is the leadership of the teacher, youth worker, trainer or adult in charge that comes from the way they work with others, rather than through their formal role – what might be termed as&#xA0;opportunistic leadership&#xA0;– taking on leadership opportunistically. It is this type of leadership that we focus more on here. In considering these roles we need to look at the relationship between the how people &#x2018;lead’ and how those they are working with &#x2018;learn’. Of course, these are not mutually exclusive. In &#x2018;leading’ one is also &#x2018;learning’. Harris (2009) considers this interplay, summarising the literature and research around teachers-as-leaders. </p><p>As a consequence of this interplay of leadership and learning, there is a complex set of interactions between those involved – for example, teachers and pupils, trainers and trainees, youth workers and young people. Roles are blurred and learning does not take place solely because of any fixed relationship between roles. This unit explores this interplay and interactions.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/course/e855.htm">E855 Leading Professional Practice in Education</a></span> and also relates to <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/course/e856.htm">E856 Educational leadership: context, strategy and collaboration</a>. Together these modules consider the practice of leadership in broadly educational contexts.</p>
  • <p>Leadership in learning settings, from formal schooling and training to informal voluntary organisations, has several dimensions. There is the leadership defined by the role of a person such as a headteacher, director or co-ordinator –&#xA0;positional leadership.&#xA0;Positional leadership in this sense does not imply being in any specific part of the hierarchy. Rather, it comes from having been appointed to a particular role or responsibility. And so headteachers have positional leadership through their role, but so can an ordinary member of staff who is allocated the lead in a particular development or activity: a headteacher has a formal leadership role; others adopt informal ones.</p><p>Then there is the leadership of the teacher, youth worker, trainer or adult in charge that comes from the way they work with others, rather than through their formal role – what might be termed as&#xA0;opportunistic leadership&#xA0;– taking on leadership opportunistically. It is this type of leadership that we focus more on here. In considering these roles we need to look at the relationship between the how people &#x2018;lead’ and how those they are working with &#x2018;learn’. Of course, these are not mutually exclusive. In &#x2018;leading’ one is also &#x2018;learning’. Harris (2009) considers this interplay, summarising the literature and research around teachers-as-leaders. </p><p>As a consequence of this interplay of leadership and learning, there is a complex set of interactions between those involved – for example, teachers and pupils, trainers and trainees, youth workers and young people. Roles are blurred and learning does not take place solely because of any fixed relationship between roles. This unit explores this interplay and interactions.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/course/e855.htm?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ol">E855 <i>Leading Professional Practice in Education</i></a></span>.</p>
  • Leadership in learning contexts is not confined to those who have it as part of their job title. Everyone has opportunities for leading - be it of learners, of colleagues in curriculum or project development, or more formally. Everyone also has the opportunity for learning. This free course, The interplay between leading and learning, explores the complex set of interactions between those involved for example, teachers and pupils, trainers and trainees, youth workers and young people.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/the-interplay-between-leading-and-learning/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 18 May 2012 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/the-interplay-between-leading-and-learning/content-section-0">The interplay between leading and learning</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2012