Youth work: Introducing policy
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  • 2012-02-16T16:45:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:50:00.000Z
  • 2016-01-27T12:32:42.000Z
  • 2016-02-17T10:02:27.000Z
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  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
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Label Youth work: Introducing policy
Title Youth work: Introducing policy
Description
  • In this unit we will look at the meaning of policy, how it works as a mechanism of persuading people to behave in particular ways, its role in shaping our understandings of young people, and the role practitioners can play in mediating and influencing policy.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/educational-technology-and-practice/educational-practice/youth-work-introducing-policy/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 16 Feb 2012 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/educational-technology-and-practice/educational-practice/youth-work-introducing-policy/content-section-0">Youth work: Introducing policy</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2012
  • <div class="oucontent-quote oucontent-s-box"><blockquote><p>Any discussion of modern youth work must include a close examination of the influence of the state.</p></blockquote><div class="oucontent-source-reference">(Payne, 2009, p. 215)</div></div><p>As we prepared this unit in England, in early 2011, we were aware that this is not an easy time to be describing and analysing what exactly &#x2018;the influence of the state’ might be on social policy in general and on youth work in particular. The 13 years of a New Labour government left a distinct, if sometimes confusing, policy trail, but one which can be followed and critiqued.</p><p>Now there is a Coalition government, which is still shaping its policies but has already given strong signals about its intentions to reduce the role of the state and increase the involvement of citizens through, for example, the Big Society. In addition, policy direction in each of the nations of the United Kingdom (UK) is following a diverging course as the devolved administrations take on more powers over public spending. So, while this is a difficult moment to be describing the substance and the direction of travel of social policy across the UK, nevertheless it is a valuable area of study for youth work practitioners for the following reasons.</p><p>Policy is constantly changing, not simply through the actions of governments but also through changes in the wider society. This unit tries to understand policy as both shaping and reflecting our sense of priorities, values and expectations about the future. So, studying policy is more than understanding what it says at the present time; it helps us to understand the factors which are driving policy and the beliefs and assumptions behind them. These are skills of analysis and frameworks for understanding that can be used in relation to future policies as they emerge. </p><p>Understanding how policy works and where it comes from allows practitioners to become more effective in influencing and implementing policy. In the course team’s view practitioners do not simply implement policy designed by central government. They can participate in the formation of policy and in &#x2018;translating’ it into practice. </p><p>The effects of devolution in the formulation of policy across the UK have been noted already. In this unit, the discussion centres mainly on policy themes which we think are relevant across the nation states, although illustration and analysis of these themes is more often based on English policies than those of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.</p><div class="&#10; oucontent-activity&#10; oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><h3 class="oucontent-h3 oucontent-heading oucontent-nonumber">Activity 1&#x2003;What is social policy?</h3><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><div class="oucontent-saq-timing">Allow about 6 minutes</div><div class="oucontent-saq-question"><p>As an introduction to policy, watch the clip below of Pete Alcock, a Professor of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham, answering the question &#x2018;What is social policy?’</p><p><span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ccff_50dFP4">Pete Alcock – What Is Social Policy?</a></span></p></div> <div class="oucontent-saq-discussion"><h4 class="oucontent-h4 oucontent-discussionhasalias">Comment</h4><p>Pete Alcock describes the scope of social policy in very general terms as the ways in which society promotes welfare and wellbeing in the population. Studying social policy usually means looking at particular aspects, for example health or education. Note how he does not take either of these as &#x2018;givens’: health and education can be understood very differently by different people or by different governments. As Alcock puts this, much depends on &#x2018;how we define it, how we promote it.’</p><p>He draws attention to the fact that social policy is not simply defined or implemented by governments, but also depends on a range of voluntary and community organisations and the informal relationships between people. This idea that policy is not simply a top-down process in which governments design and deliver policy solutions to social problems will be revisited throughout this unit. </p></div></div></div></div><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/e318?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">E318 <i>Youth: policy in practice</i></a>.</p>
  • In this free course, Youth work: Introducing policy, we will look at the meaning of policy, how it works as a mechanism for persuading people to behave in particular ways, its role in shaping our understandings of young people, and the role practitioners can play in mediating and influencing policy.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/educational-technology-and-practice/educational-practice/youth-work-introducing-policy/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 16 Feb 2012 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/educational-technology-and-practice/educational-practice/youth-work-introducing-policy/content-section-0">Youth work: Introducing policy</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2012
  • <p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/e318.htm">E318 Youth: policy in practice</a></span>.</p><div class="oucontent-quote oucontent-s-box"><blockquote><p>Any discussion of modern youth work must include a close examination of the influence of the state.</p></blockquote><div class="oucontent-source-reference">(Payne, 2009, p. 215)</div></div><p>As we prepared this unit in England, in early 2011, we were aware that this is not an easy time to be describing and analysing what exactly &#x2018;the influence of the state’ might be on social policy in general and on youth work in particular. The 13 years of a New Labour government left a distinct, if sometimes confusing, policy trail, but one which can be followed and critiqued.</p><p>Now there is a Coalition government, which is still shaping its policies but has already given strong signals about its intentions to reduce the role of the state and increase the involvement of citizens through, for example, the Big Society. In addition, policy direction in each of the nations of the United Kingdom (UK) is following a diverging course as the devolved administrations take on more powers over public spending. So, while this is a difficult moment to be describing the substance and the direction of travel of social policy across the UK, nevertheless it is a valuable area of study for youth work practitioners for the following reasons.</p><p>Policy is constantly changing, not simply through the actions of governments but also through changes in the wider society. This unit tries to understand policy as both shaping and reflecting our sense of priorities, values and expectations about the future. So, studying policy is more than understanding what it says at the present time; it helps us to understand the factors which are driving policy and the beliefs and assumptions behind them. These are skills of analysis and frameworks for understanding that can be used in relation to future policies as they emerge. </p><p>Understanding how policy works and where it comes from allows practitioners to become more effective in influencing and implementing policy. In the course team’s view practitioners do not simply implement policy designed by central government. They can participate in the formation of policy and in &#x2018;translating’ it into practice. </p><p>The effects of devolution in the formulation of policy across the UK have been noted already. In this unit, the discussion centres mainly on policy themes which we think are relevant across the nation states, although illustration and analysis of these themes is more often based on English policies than those of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.</p><div class="&#10; oucontent-activity&#10; oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><h3 class="oucontent-h3 oucontent-nonumber">Activity 1&#x2003;What is social policy?</h3><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><div class="oucontent-saq-timing">Allow about 6 minutes</div><div class="oucontent-saq-question"> <p>As an introduction to policy, watch the clip<b> </b>below<b> </b>of Pete Alcock, a Professor of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham, answering the question &#x2018;What is social policy?’</p> <p><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ccff_50dFP4">Pete Alcock – What Is Social Policy?</a></p> </div> <div class="oucontent-saq-discussion"><h4 class="oucontent-h4 oucontent-discussionhasalias">Comment</h4> <p>Pete Alcock describes the scope of social policy in very general terms as the ways in which society promotes welfare and wellbeing in the population. Studying social policy usually means looking at particular aspects, for example health or education. Note how he does not take either of these as &#x2018;givens’: health and education can be understood very differently by different people or by different governments. As Alcock puts this, much depends on &#x2018;how we define it, how we promote it.’</p> <p>He draws attention to the fact that social policy is not simply defined or implemented by governments, but also depends on a range of voluntary and community organisations and the informal relationships between people. This idea that policy is not simply a top-down process in which governments design and deliver policy solutions to social problems will be revisited throughout this unit. </p> </div></div></div></div>
  • <div class="oucontent-quote oucontent-s-box"><blockquote><p>Any discussion of modern youth work must include a close examination of the influence of the state.</p></blockquote><div class="oucontent-source-reference">(Payne, 2009, p. 215)</div></div><p>As we prepared this course in England, in early 2011, we were aware that this is not an easy time to be describing and analysing what exactly &#x2018;the influence of the state’ might be on social policy in general and on youth work in particular. The 13 years of a New Labour government left a distinct, if sometimes confusing, policy trail, but one which can be followed and critiqued.</p><p>Now there is a Coalition government, which is still shaping its policies but has already given strong signals about its intentions to reduce the role of the state and increase the involvement of citizens through, for example, the Big Society. In addition, policy direction in each of the nations of the United Kingdom (UK) is following a diverging course as the devolved administrations take on more powers over public spending. So, while this is a difficult moment to be describing the substance and the direction of travel of social policy across the UK, nevertheless it is a valuable area of study for youth work practitioners for the following reasons.</p><p>Policy is constantly changing, not simply through the actions of governments but also through changes in the wider society. This course tries to understand policy as both shaping and reflecting our sense of priorities, values and expectations about the future. So, studying policy is more than understanding what it says at the present time; it helps us to understand the factors which are driving policy and the beliefs and assumptions behind them. These are skills of analysis and frameworks for understanding that can be used in relation to future policies as they emerge. </p><p>Understanding how policy works and where it comes from allows practitioners to become more effective in influencing and implementing policy. In the course team’s view practitioners do not simply implement policy designed by central government. They can participate in the formation of policy and in &#x2018;translating’ it into practice. </p><p>The effects of devolution in the formulation of policy across the UK have been noted already. In this course, the discussion centres mainly on policy themes which we think are relevant across the nation states, although illustration and analysis of these themes is more often based on English policies than those of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.</p><div class="&#10; oucontent-activity&#10; oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><h3 class="oucontent-h3 oucontent-heading oucontent-nonumber">Activity 1&#x2003;What is social policy?</h3><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><div class="oucontent-saq-timing">Allow about 6 minutes</div><div class="oucontent-saq-question"><p>As an introduction to policy, watch the clip below of Pete Alcock, a Professor of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham, answering the question &#x2018;What is social policy?’</p><p>If you are reading this course as an ebook, you can access this video here: <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ccff_50dFP4">Pete Alcock – What Is Social Policy?</a></span></p></div> <div class="oucontent-saq-discussion"><h4 class="oucontent-h4 oucontent-discussionhasalias">Comment</h4><p>Pete Alcock describes the scope of social policy in very general terms as the ways in which society promotes welfare and wellbeing in the population. Studying social policy usually means looking at particular aspects, for example health or education. Note how he does not take either of these as &#x2018;givens’: health and education can be understood very differently by different people or by different governments. As Alcock puts this, much depends on &#x2018;how we define it, how we promote it.’</p><p>He draws attention to the fact that social policy is not simply defined or implemented by governments, but also depends on a range of voluntary and community organisations and the informal relationships between people. This idea that policy is not simply a top-down process in which governments design and deliver policy solutions to social problems will be revisited throughout this course. </p></div></div></div></div><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/e318?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">E318 <i>Youth: policy in practice</i></a>.</p>
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