Exercise and mental health
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/e233_2
is a Unit , Document

Outgoing links

Property Object
subject There are 128 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Dataset OpenLearn
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Subject
Course e233
To e233
Relates to course e233
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2010-11-25T17:10:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:49:24.000Z
  • 2016-01-27T16:34:34.000Z
  • 2016-02-16T15:32:01.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Exercise and mental health
Title Exercise and mental health
Description
  • <p>Physical activity can have a positive effect on aspects of mental health and psychological well-being, such as depression, mood and cognitive function. In this course we will examine the effects that exercise can have on different aspects of our mental health. We will use the case study of Malcolm.</p><p>We will begin by defining what is meant by the term &#x2018;mental health’. Corbin et al. (2008, p.5) define mental health and wellness as the absence of mental illness, such as depression, and the ability to cope with daily challenges in a positive, optimistic and constructive manner. Using this definition there are potentially two ways in which exercise can benefit mental health. First, exercise can prevent or reduce the extent of mental illnesses such as depression. Second, exercise can enhance mood and reduce stress levels, thus allowing us to tackle daily challenges in a more positive, optimistic and constructive way.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/e233?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">E233 <i>Sport and exercise psychology: a case study approach</i></a></span>. </p>
  • Each year thousands of pounds are spent on medications to treat conditions such as anxiety and depression. These medications often have negative side effects. Exercise is an alternative treatment that is low cost and has few side effects. In this unit we will look at the links between exercise and improved mental health and psychological well-being. This will include consideration of the role of exercise in combating stress, anxiety and depression, and in enchancing mood.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/sport-and-fitness/exercise-and-mental-health/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 25 Nov 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/sport-and-fitness/exercise-and-mental-health/content-section-0">Exercise and mental health</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2010
  • Each year thousands of pounds are spent on medications to treat conditions such as anxiety and depression. These medications often have negative side effects. Exercise is an alternative treatment that is low cost and has few side effects. In this free course, Exercise and mental health, we will look at the links between exercise and improved mental health and psychological well-being. This will include consideration of the role of exercise in combating stress, anxiety and depression, and in enhancing mood.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/sport-and-fitness/exercise-and-mental-health/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 25 Nov 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/sport-and-fitness/exercise-and-mental-health/content-section-0">Exercise and mental health</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2010
  • <p>Physical activity can have a positive effect on aspects of mental health and psychological well-being, such as depression, mood and cognitive function. In this unit we will examine the effects that exercise can have on different aspects of our mental health. We will use the case study of Malcolm.</p><p>We will begin by defining what is meant by the term &#x2018;mental health’. Corbin et al. (2008, p.5) define mental health and wellness as the absence of mental illness, such as depression, and the ability to cope with daily challenges in a positive, optimistic and constructive manner. Using this definition there are potentially two ways in which exercise can benefit mental health. First, exercise can prevent or reduce the extent of mental illnesses such as depression. Second, exercise can enhance mood and reduce stress levels, thus allowing us to tackle daily challenges in a more positive, optimistic and constructive way.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/e233?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">E233 <i>Sport and exercise psychology: a case study approach</i></a></span>. </p>
  • <p>Physical activity can have a positive effect on aspects of mental health and psychological well-being, such as depression, mood and cognitive function. In this unit we will examine the effects that exercise can have on different aspects of our mental health. We will use the case study of Malcolm.</p><p>We will begin by defining what is meant by the term &#x2018;mental health’. Corbin et al. (2008, p.5) define mental health and wellness as the absence of mental illness, such as depression, and the ability to cope with daily challenges in a positive, optimistic and constructive manner. Using this definition there are potentially two ways in which exercise can benefit mental health. First, exercise can prevent or reduce the extent of mental illnesses such as depression. Second, exercise can enhance mood and reduce stress levels, thus allowing us to tackle daily challenges in a more positive, optimistic and constructive way.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/e233.htm"><i>Sport and exercise psychology</i>: <i>A case study approach</i></a></span> (E233)</p>