Nuclear power: Friend or foe?
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/du311_1
is a Unit , Document

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  • 2011-08-10T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-08-10T11:49:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:52:51.000Z
  • 2016-02-09T16:01:44.000Z
  • 2016-02-24T14:20:00.000Z
  • 2016-02-25T12:39:47.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
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  • Nuclear power: Friend or foe?
  • Nuclear power: friend or foe?
Title
  • Nuclear power: Friend or foe?
  • Nuclear power: friend or foe?
Description
  • <p>The debate for and against nuclear energy has been continuing and vigorous. It is a subject that people tend to have a view about, for nuclear energy is not simply an issue about rational choice of an energy option; it also arouses ethical choices based on opposing values. The debate has ebbed and flowed over the years, influenced by the prevailing discourses. During the early years, the era of the discourse of trust in technology, nuclear energy was regarded favourably and opposing views were largely absent. Later on, as fears about the risks from nuclear energy grew so too did opposition, contributing to a more defensive position by pro-nuclear interests. For a while it appeared that an uneasy consensus was emerging on the issue of radioactive waste management, but positions on the issue of nuclear energy remained entrenched. With the so-called &#x2018;nuclear renaissance’ gathering momentum in recent years, nuclear advocates, backed by governments, have gained in confidence while opponents have resorted, once again, to mobilising against further expansion of nuclear energy.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/du311?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">DU311 <i>Earth in crisis: environmental policy in an international context</i></a></span>.</p>
  • Are you for or against nuclear energy? The necessity to respond to climate change has put nuclear energy back on the politial agenda as an alternative energy source. This is part of approaches to 'decarbonise' energy through a shift from coal to natural gas, nuclear energy and renewables. Yet, the recourse to nuclear energy is hotly debated. Opponents are rife, as you are supporter. Can you adopt each position in turn? This unit challenges you to do so.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 10 Aug 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0">Nuclear power: Friend or foe?</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Are you for or against nuclear energy? The necessity to respond to climate change has put nuclear energy back on the political agenda as an alternative energy source. This is part of approaches to 'decarbonise' energy through a shift from coal to natural gas, nuclear energy and renewables. Yet, the recourse to nuclear energy is hotly debated. Opponents are rife, as are supporters. Can you adopt each position in turn? This free course, Nuclear power: Friend or foe?, challenges you to do so.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 10 Aug 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0">Nuclear power: Friend or foe?</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>The debate for and against nuclear energy has been continuing and vigorous. It is a subject that people tend to have a view about, for nuclear energy is not simply an issue about rational choice of an energy option; it also arouses ethical choices based on opposing values. The debate has ebbed and flowed over the years, influenced by the prevailing discourses. During the early years, the era of the discourse of trust in technology, nuclear energy was regarded favourably and opposing views were largely absent. Later on, as fears about the risks from nuclear energy grew so too did opposition, contributing to a more defensive position by pro-nuclear interests. For a while it appeared that an uneasy consensus was emerging on the issue of radioactive waste management, but positions on the issue of nuclear energy remained entrenched. With the so-called &#x2018;nuclear renaissance’ gathering momentum in recent years, nuclear advocates, backed by governments, have gained in confidence while opponents have resorted, once again, to mobilising against further expansion of nuclear energy.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course<b> </b><span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/du311.htm">Earth in crisis: environmental policy in an international context (DU311)</a></span>.</p>
  • Are you for or against nuclear energy? The necessity to respond to climate change has put nuclear energy back on the political agenda as an alternative energy source. This is part of approaches to 'decarbonise' energy through a shift from coal to natural gas, nuclear energy and renewables. Yet, the recourse to nuclear energy is hotly debated. Opponents are rife, as are supporters. Can you adopt each position in turn? This free course, Nuclear power: Friend or foe?, challenges you to do so.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 24 Feb 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0">Nuclear power: Friend or foe?</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • Are you for or against nuclear energy? The necessity to respond to climate change has put nuclear energy back on the politial agenda as an alternative energy source. This is part of approaches to 'decarbonise' energy through a shift from coal to natural gas, nuclear energy and renewables. Yet, the recourse to nuclear energy is hotly debated. Opponents are rife, as you are supporter. Can you adopt each position in turn? This unit challenges you to do so.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 10 Aug 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/nuclear-power-friend-or-foe/content-section-0">Nuclear power: Friend or foe?</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
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Subject Sociology
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn