Living in a globalised world
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/dd205_1
is a Unit , Document

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Course dd205
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Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-25T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2014-01-09T09:43:00.000Z
  • 2014-01-09T10:01:19.000Z
  • 2016-02-09T13:01:43.000Z
  • 2016-02-24T11:47:00.000Z
  • 2016-02-25T12:39:27.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Living in a globalised world
Title Living in a globalised world
Description
  • Using the US and Mexico as the main example, this free course, Living in a globalised world, examines how inequalities in access to material wealth can lead to border tensions. You will also learn how many developed economies are now reliant on immigrant labour to perform jobs that their own citizens do not want to consider. How equal is the globalised world?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 24 Feb 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0">Living in a globalised world</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • Using the US and Mexico as the main example, this unit examines how inequalities in access to material wealth can lead to border tensions. You will also learn how many developed economies are now reliant on immigrant labour to perform jobs that their own citizens do not want to consider. How equal is the globalised world?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 25 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0">Living in a globalised world</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Using the US and Mexico as the main example, this unit examines how inequalities in access to material wealth can lead to border tensions. You will also learn how many developed economies are now reliant on immigrant labour to perform jobs that their own citizens do not want to consider. How equal is the globalised world?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 09 Jan 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0">Living in a globalised world</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <p>This course interrogates the idea of a globalised world by showing how inequalities in access to material wealth and expectations of lifestyle, which have been created historically between the US and Mexico, produces border tensions as Mexicans seek entry to the US to do jobs that resident American citizens will not undertake for the wages offered. It is particularly relevant currently in the context of debates about free trade and movement of workforce to where they could find work, and that many developed economies in particular at the moment are reliant on immigrant labour to work in areas in which their own citizens will not.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/dd205?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">DD205 <i>Living in a globalised world</i></a></span>.</p>
  • Using the US and Mexico as the main example, this free course, Living in a globalised world, examines how inequalities in access to material wealth can lead to border tensions. You will also learn how many developed economies are now reliant on immigrant labour to perform jobs that their own citizens do not want to consider. How equal is the globalised world?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 09 Jan 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/living-globalised-world/content-section-0">Living in a globalised world</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <p>This unit interrogates the idea of a globalised world by showing how inequalities in access to material wealth and expectations of lifestyle, which have been created historically between the US and Mexico, produces border tensions as Mexicans seek entry to the US to do jobs that resident American citizens will not undertake for the wages offered. It is particularly relevant currently in the context of debates about free trade and movement of workforce to where they could find work, and that many developed economies in particular at the moment are reliant on immigrant labour to work in areas in which their own citizens will not.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course<span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/dd205.htm"><i> Living in a globalised world</i> (DD205). </a></span></p>
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn