Belfast - healthy city
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/belfast-healthy-city
is a Unit , Document

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subject There are 30 more objects.
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Subject There are 13 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
URL
Locator
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2010-03-25T00:00:00.000Z
  • 2010-03-25T03:12:08.000Z
License Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Belfast - healthy city
Title Belfast - healthy city
Description
  • In the late nineteen eighties, Belfast became part of the World Health Organisation's Healthy Cities Project. The aim was to get as many institutions as possible to make health central to their planning and to give the diverse communities of Belfast a real say in their future. What were the challenges they faced? What solutions did they evolve? In this album Healthy Cities founder member Ilona Kickbusch and Belfast health promotion professionals Joan Devlin, David Stewart and Mary Black explore the history of this important health project. They reveal the crucial role that partnerships across both public and private bodies played in the success of the project. This material, recorded in 2006, forms part of The Open University course K311 Promoting public health: skills, perspectives and practice.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city">Belfast - healthy city</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website.
  • In the late nineteen eighties, Belfast became part of the World Health Organisation's Healthy Cities Project. The aim was to get as many institutions as possible to make health central to their planning and to give the diverse communities of Belfast a real say in their future. What were the challenges they faced? What solutions did they evolve? In this album Healthy Cities founder member Ilona Kickbusch and Belfast health promotion professionals Joan Devlin, David Stewart and Mary Black explore the history of this important health project. They reveal the crucial role that partnerships across both public and private bodies played in the success of the project. This material, recorded in 2006, forms part of The Open University course K311 Promoting public health: skills, perspectives and practice.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts<br />First published on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city">Belfast - healthy city</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010
  • In the late nineteen eighties, Belfast became part of the World Health Organisation's Healthy Cities Project. The aim was to get as many institutions as possible to make health central to their planning and to give the diverse communities of Belfast a real say in their future. What were the challenges they faced? What solutions did they evolve? In this album Healthy Cities founder member Ilona Kickbusch and Belfast health promotion professionals Joan Devlin, David Stewart and Mary Black explore the history of this important health project. They reveal the crucial role that partnerships across both public and private bodies played in the success of the project. This material, recorded in 2006, forms part of The Open University course K311 Promoting public health: skills, perspectives and practice.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city">Belfast - healthy city</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 2010
  • In the late nineteen eighties, Belfast became part of the World Health Organisation's Healthy Cities Project. The aim was to get as many institutions as possible to make health central to their planning and to give the diverse communities of Belfast a real say in their future. What were the challenges they faced? What solutions did they evolve? In this album Healthy Cities founder member Ilona Kickbusch and Belfast health promotion professionals Joan Devlin, David Stewart and Mary Black explore the history of this important health project. They reveal the crucial role that partnerships across both public and private bodies played in the success of the project. This material, recorded in 2006, forms part of The Open University course K311 Promoting public health: skills, perspectives and practice.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city" /> The iTunes U team. The iTunes U Team at The Open University produce audio and video podcasts <br />First published on Thu, 25 Mar 2010 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/sociology/belfast-healthy-city">Belfast - healthy city</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Copyright 2010