Strategic view of performance
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/b700_3
is a Unit , Document

Outgoing links

Property Object
subject There are 46 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Course Managing Performance and Change
To Managing Performance and Change
Relates to course Managing Performance and Change
Dataset OpenLearn
Subject
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-08T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-08T15:45:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-08T16:45:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:51:31.000Z
  • 2015-05-07T17:01:20.000Z
  • 2016-01-13T13:31:36.000Z
  • 2016-01-14T17:02:20.000Z
  • 2016-02-11T10:32:02.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label
  • Strategic view of performance
  • What do we mean by strategy
Title
  • Strategic view of performance
  • What do we mean by strategy
Description
  • <p>In this session we take a closer look at what is meant by strategy. The classical approach to strategic management treats strategic planning and control as purely the province of senior managers. More recent approaches accept that middle-level managers may have an important role to play, not only in implementing strategy but also in the emergence and formulation of strategic direction. We will look at three broad approaches to understanding strategy. First, we examine the idea of strategy as a formal, top-down process of analysis and planning based on a considered response to the environment in which the organisation operates, and its core mission. Second, we consider strategy as the identification and development of core capabilities and networks of relationships, as a source of competitive advantage. Third, we turn to one important aspect of strategy: understanding and managing the creation of value, within and between organisations. Finally, we consider the ways in which strategic direction can emerge over time as the accumulation of smaller tactical decisions, as opposed to a formal, top-down process of analysis and planning.</p><p>This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from <i>Managing performance and change</i> (B700) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/business-and-management/index.htm"> subject area</a></span>. </p>
  • Strategic management and planning are no longer the preserve of senior executives. This unit looks at three different approaches to strategy before analysing the direction that strategic management may take now that it has become an accumulation of small tactical decisions rather than a top-down process. If you are interested in ‘ how’ a business ‘ ticks’, this unit could provide some of the answers.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/human-resources/strategic-view-performance/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 08 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/human-resources/strategic-view-performance/content-section-0">Strategic view of performance</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Strategic management and planning are no longer the preserve of senior executives. This free course, Strategic view of performance, looks at three different approaches to strategy before analysing the direction that strategic management may take now that it has become an accumulation of small tactical decisions rather than a top-down process. If you are interested in how a business 'ticks', this course could provide some of the answers.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/human-resources/strategic-view-performance/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 08 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/money-management/management/human-resources/strategic-view-performance/content-section-0">Strategic view of performance</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>In this session we take a closer look at what is meant by strategy. The classical approach to strategic management treats strategic planning and control as purely the province of senior managers. More recent approaches accept that middle-level managers may have an important role to play, not only in implementing strategy but also in the emergence and formulation of strategic direction. We will look at three broad approaches to understanding strategy. First, we examine the idea of strategy as a formal, top-down process of analysis and planning based on a considered response to the environment in which the organisation operates, and its core mission. Second, we consider strategy as the identification and development of core capabilities and networks of relationships, as a source of competitive advantage. Third, we turn to one important aspect of strategy: understanding and managing the creation of value, within and between organisations. Finally, we consider the ways in which strategic direction can emerge over time as the accumulation of smaller tactical decisions, as opposed to a formal, top-down process of analysis and planning.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of postgraduate study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/business-and-management?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Business &amp; Management</a></span></p>
  • <p>In this session we take a closer look at what is meant by strategy. The classical approach to strategic management treats strategic planning and control as purely the province of senior managers. More recent approaches accept that middle-level managers may have an important role to play, not only in implementing strategy but also in the emergence and formulation of strategic direction. We will look at three broad approaches to understanding strategy. First, we examine the idea of strategy as a formal, top-down process of analysis and planning based on a considered response to the environment in which the organisation operates, and its core mission. Second, we consider strategy as the identification and development of core capabilities and networks of relationships, as a source of competitive advantage. Third, we turn to one important aspect of strategy: understanding and managing the creation of value, within and between organisations. Finally, we consider the ways in which strategic direction can emerge over time as the accumulation of smaller tactical decisions, as opposed to a formal, top-down process of analysis and planning.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of postgraduate study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/find/business?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Business</a></span></p>