Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/aa314_3
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Course Studies in Music 1750-2000
To Studies in Music 1750-2000
Relates to course Studies in Music 1750-2000
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URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2012-12-04T12:13:00.000Z
  • 2014-04-08T11:31:51.000Z
  • 2014-06-05T14:54:00.000Z
  • 2014-06-05T15:01:47.000Z
  • 2016-02-08T12:15:00.000Z
  • 2016-02-08T12:32:39.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background
Title Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background
Description
  • The music of Mozart has been used to examine the foreground and middleground of harmony in units AA314_1 and AA314_2. Now you will use Beethoven's Eighth Symphony to consider the largest-scale stage of voice-leading analysis.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 04 Dec 2012 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0">Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2012
  • The music of Mozart has been used to examine the foreground and middleground of harmony in free courses AA314_1 and AA314_2. In this free course, Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background, you will use Beethoven's Eighth Symphony to consider the largest-scale stage of voice-leading analysis.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 05 Jun 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0">Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <p>This unit is from our archive. It is an adapted extract from the course Studies in Music 1750–2000: Interpretation and Analysis (AA314) that is no longer in presentation, although other courses in this topic are available to <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/arts-and-humanities/index.htm">Study.</a></span></p><p>This unit analyses the &#x2018;voice leading’ of the harmony. The method of going about this kind of analysis is applicable to any piece of tonal music. Just as Mozart's piano sonatas are an excellent source of examples for studying the voice leading at the foreground and middleground of the harmony, so Beethoven's Eighth Symphony is also an ideal work in which to start to consider the largest-scale stage of voice-leading analysis.</p><p>This unit requires you to switch between several different formats of material. This reflects the particular nature of analysis, where you are constantly comparing what you write out, or see in the score or analytical graph, with what you can hear – a difficult job! So make every effort to work through these materials in the manner and order suggested.</p><p>Please note that you should have studied OpenLearn units <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=4507">AA314_1</a> and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=4508">AA314_2</a> <b>before</b> attempting this unit.</p><p>The materials upon which this unit is based have been authored by Robert Samuels.</p>
  • The music of Mozart has been used to examine the foreground and middleground of harmony in units AA314_1 and AA314_2. Now you will use Beethoven's Eighth Symphony to consider the largest-scale stage of voice-leading analysis.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 05 Jun 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0">Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <p>This course analyses the &#x2018;voice leading’ of the harmony. The method of going about this kind of analysis is applicable to any piece of tonal music. Just as Mozart's piano sonatas are an excellent source of examples for studying the voice leading at the foreground and middleground of the harmony, so Beethoven's Eighth Symphony is also an ideal work in which to start to consider the largest-scale stage of voice-leading analysis.</p><p>This course requires you to switch between several different formats of material. This reflects the particular nature of analysis, where you are constantly comparing what you write out, or see in the score or analytical graph, with what you can hear – a difficult job! So make every effort to work through these materials in the manner and order suggested.</p><p>Please note that you should have studied OpenLearn courses <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-1-the-foreground/content-section-0?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ol">AA314_1 <i>Voice-leading analysis of music 1: the foreground</i></a></span> and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-2-the-middleground/content-section-0?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ol">AA314_2 <i>Voice-leading analysis of music 2: the middleground</i></a> <b>before</b> attempting this course.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 3 study in <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/arts-and-humanities?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Arts and Humanities</a>.</p><p>The materials upon which this course is based have been authored by Robert Samuels.</p>
  • The music of Mozart has been used to examine the foreground and middleground of harmony in free courses AA314_1 and AA314_2. In this free course, Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background, you will use Beethoven's Eighth Symphony to consider the largest-scale stage of voice-leading analysis.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 08 Feb 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/music/voice-leading-analysis-music-3-the-background/content-section-0">Voice-leading analysis of music 3: the background</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016