Plato on tradition and belief
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/aa100_2
is a Unit , Document

Outgoing links

Property Object
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
Subject
Course aa100
To aa100
Relates to course aa100
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2015-02-09T16:02:00.000Z
  • 2015-02-09T16:32:11.000Z
  • 2016-01-15T11:17:00.000Z
  • 2016-01-15T11:31:29.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2014 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Plato on tradition and belief
Title Plato on tradition and belief
Description
  • <p>In this unit, we shall read some extracts from the <i>Laches, </i>a dialogue written by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato (<i>c</i>. 427–347 <span class="oucontent-smallcaps">bce</span>) (see Figure 1). One of our aims in reading these extracts is to discover how Plato uses philosophical argument to question traditional beliefs.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/aa100.htm"><i>The Arts Past and Present</i> (AA100)</a></span>.</p>
  • How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course, Plato on tradition and belief, explores Plato's dialogue, the Laches, to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason, rather than tradition, to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/plato-on-tradition-and-belief/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 09 Feb 2015 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/plato-on-tradition-and-belief/content-section-0">Plato on tradition and belief</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2015
  • <p>In this course, we shall read some extracts from the <i>Laches, </i>a dialogue written by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato (<i>c</i>. 427–347 <span class="oucontent-smallcaps">bce</span>) (see Figure 1). One of our aims in reading these extracts is to discover how Plato uses philosophical argument to question traditional beliefs.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/aa100.htm?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">AA100<i> The Arts Past and Present</i></a></span>.</p>
  • How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course, Plato on tradition and belief, explores Plato's dialogue, the Laches, to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason, rather than tradition, to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/plato-on-tradition-and-belief/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/plato-on-tradition-and-belief/content-section-0">Plato on tradition and belief</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This unit explores Plato's dialogue, the Laches, to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason, rather than tradition, to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/plato-on-tradition-and-belief/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 09 Feb 2015 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/plato-on-tradition-and-belief/content-section-0">Plato on tradition and belief</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2015