The body in antiquity
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/a864_1
is a Unit , Document

Outgoing links

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Subject
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
Course a864
To a864
Relates to course a864
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2015-07-09T14:41:00.000Z
  • 2015-07-27T10:20:00.000Z
  • 2015-07-27T10:32:49.000Z
  • 2015-12-14T12:02:08.000Z
  • 2016-01-06T16:11:00.000Z
  • 2016-01-06T16:32:56.000Z
  • 2016-01-18T08:19:00.000Z
  • 2016-01-18T08:31:26.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2014 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2015 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label The body in antiquity
Title The body in antiquity
Description
  • This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 18 Jan 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0">The body in antiquity</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • <p>This free course will&#xA0;introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation.&#xA0;In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and classical studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily&#xA0;needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world&#xA0;around them.&#xA0;The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture – it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course&#xA0;<span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/modules/a864?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">A864&#xA0;<i>MA Classical Studies Part 2.</i></a></span></p><div class="oucontent-figure oucontent-media-mini"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/495822/mod_oucontent/oucontent/20202/481a1629/1424bf85/a864_open_learn_fig001.jpg" alt="Described image" width="250" height="370" longdesc="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp2824272"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption">Figure 1 Copy of <i>Discobolus</i>, by Myron (fifth century BCE), marble. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo: Ancient Art and Architecture Collection Ltd/Bridgeman Images. </span></div></div><div class="oucontent-longdesclink oucontent-longdesconly"><a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp2824272&amp;clicked=1">Long description</a></div><a id="back_longdesc_idp2824272"></a></div>
  • This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture – it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 09 Jul 2015 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0">The body in antiquity</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2015
  • <p>This free course will&#xA0;introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation.&#xA0;In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and classical studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily&#xA0;needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world&#xA0;around them.&#xA0;The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture – it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course&#xA0;<span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/modules/a864?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">A864&#xA0;<i>MA Classical Studies Part 2</i></a></span>.</p><div class="oucontent-figure oucontent-media-mini"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/495822/mod_oucontent/oucontent/20202/481a1629/1424bf85/a864_open_learn_fig001.jpg" alt="Described image" width="250" height="370" longdesc="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp5524816"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption">Figure 1 Copy of <i>Discobolus</i>, by Myron (fifth century BCE), marble. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo: Ancient Art and Architecture Collection Ltd/Bridgeman Images. </span></div></div><div class="oucontent-longdesclink oucontent-longdesconly"><a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp5524816&amp;clicked=1">Long description</a></div><a id="back_longdesc_idp5524816"></a></div>
  • This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 27 Jul 2015 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0">The body in antiquity</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2015
  • <p>This free course will&#xA0;introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation.&#xA0;In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and classical studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily&#xA0;needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world&#xA0;around them.&#xA0;The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture – it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course&#xA0;<span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/modules/a864?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">A864&#xA0;<i>MA Classical Studies Part 2</i></a></span>.</p><div class="oucontent-figure oucontent-media-mini"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/495822/mod_oucontent/oucontent/20202/481a1629/1424bf85/a864_open_learn_fig001.jpg" alt="Described image" width="250" height="370" longdesc="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp2826208"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption">Figure 1 Copy of <i>Discobolus</i>, by Myron (fifth century BCE), marble. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo: Ancient Art and Architecture Collection Ltd/Bridgeman Images. </span></div></div><div class="oucontent-longdesclink oucontent-longdesconly"><a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp2826208&amp;clicked=1">Long description</a></div><a id="back_longdesc_idp2826208"></a></div>
  • This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture – it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 27 Jul 2015 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0">The body in antiquity</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2015
  • This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 06 Jan 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0">The body in antiquity</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • <p>This free course will&#xA0;introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation.&#xA0;In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and classical studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily&#xA0;needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world&#xA0;around them.&#xA0;The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture – it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course&#xA0;<span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/modules/a864"><b>A864&#xA0;<i>MA Classical Studies Part 2.</i></b></a></span></p><div class="oucontent-figure oucontent-media-mini"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/495822/mod_oucontent/oucontent/20202/481a1629/1424bf85/a864_open_learn_fig001.jpg" alt="Described image" width="250" height="370" longdesc="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp2799936"/><div class="oucontent-figure-text"><div class="oucontent-caption oucontent-nonumber"><span class="oucontent-figure-caption">Figure 1 Copy of <i>Discobolus</i>, by Myron (fifth century BCE), marble. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo: Ancient Art and Architecture Collection Ltd/Bridgeman Images. </span></div></div><div class="oucontent-longdesclink oucontent-longdesconly"><a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=20583&amp;extra=longdesc_idp2799936&amp;clicked=1">Long description</a></div><a id="back_longdesc_idp2799936"></a></div>
  • This free course, The body in antiquity, will introduce you to the concept of the body in Greek and Roman civilisation. In recent years, the body has become a steadily growing field in historical scholarship, and Classical Studies is no exception. It is an aspect of the ancient world that can be explored through a whole host of different types of evidence: art, literature and archaeological artefacts to name but a few. The way that people fulfil their basic bodily needs and engage in their daily activities is embedded in the social world around them. The body is a subject that can reveal fascinating aspects of both Greek and Roman culture it will help you to better understand the diversity of ancient civilisation. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 27 Jul 2015 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/the-body-antiquity/content-section-0">The body in antiquity</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2015