Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/a218_3
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Creator The Open University
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Course a218
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Language en-gb
Published
  • 2013-11-06T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2014-02-20T09:48:00.000Z
  • 2014-02-20T09:52:00.000Z
  • 2014-02-20T10:01:29.000Z
  • 2015-12-11T16:31:47.000Z
  • 2015-12-15T10:02:08.000Z
  • 2016-01-08T12:31:34.000Z
  • 2016-01-11T10:31:58.000Z
  • 2016-02-05T15:02:25.000Z
  • 2016-04-14T17:35:27.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2015 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century
Title Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century
Description
  • This unit examines the role that Scots played in contributing to the developments in healthcare during the nineteenth century. The radical transformation of medicine in Europe included the admission of women as doctors and the increased numbers of specialised institutions such as asylums. Such developments were also influenced by wider social, economic, political and cultural backgrounds – these are also examined.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/history-science-technology-and-medicine/history-medicine/health-disease-and-society-scottish-influence-the-19th-century/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 20 Feb 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/history-science-technology-and-medicine/history-medicine/health-disease-and-society-scottish-influence-the-19th-century/content-section-0">Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • This unit examines the role that Scots played in contributing to the developments in healthcare during the nineteenth century. The radical transformation of medicine in Europe included the admission of women as doctors and the increased numbers of specialised institutions such as asylums. Such developments were also influenced by wider social, economic, political and cultural backgrounds – these are also examined.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/history-science-technology-and-medicine/history-medicine/health-disease-and-society-scottish-influence-the-19th-century/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 06 Nov 2013 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/history-science-technology-and-medicine/history-medicine/health-disease-and-society-scottish-influence-the-19th-century/content-section-0">Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2013
  • <p>This unit examines the roles of Scots who contributed to the comprehensive transformation of medicine in the nineteenth century. It begins by observing how laboratory practices led to improved techniques of medical diagnosis. This is followed by assessing how Scots contributed to the emerging collective identity of medical practitioners, as well as the improvements in licensing that led to reform of the medical professions. Many new developments in medical education also enabled women to qualify and practise medicine for the first time.</p><p>Finally, using many Scottish examples, the last section of this unit presents information about how healthcare institutions, namely asylums, were again influenced by social, economic, political and cultural contexts.</p><span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/a218.htm"><i>Medi</i><i>cine and Society in Europe 1500-1930</i></a></span><i>.</i>
  • <p>This unit examines the roles of Scots who contributed to the comprehensive transformation of medicine in the nineteenth century. It begins by observing how laboratory practices led to improved techniques of medical diagnosis. This is followed by assessing how Scots contributed to the emerging collective identity of medical practitioners, as well as the improvements in licensing that led to reform of the medical professions. Many new developments in medical education also enabled women to qualify and practise medicine for the first time.</p><p>Finally, using many Scottish examples, the last section of this unit presents information about how healthcare institutions, namely asylums, were again influenced by social, economic, political and cultural contexts.</p><p>This free course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/a218?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">A218<i> Medicine and Society in Europe 1500-1930</i></a></span>.</p>
  • <p>This course examines the roles of Scots who contributed to the comprehensive transformation of medicine in the nineteenth century. It begins by observing how laboratory practices led to improved techniques of medical diagnosis. This is followed by assessing how Scots contributed to the emerging collective identity of medical practitioners, as well as the improvements in licensing that led to reform of the medical professions. Many new developments in medical education also enabled women to qualify and practise medicine for the first time.</p><p>Finally, using many Scottish examples, the last section of this course presents information about how healthcare institutions, namely asylums, were again influenced by social, economic, political and cultural contexts.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 2 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/arts-and-humanities?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Arts and Humanities</a></span>.</p>
  • This free course, Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century, examines the role that Scots played in contributing to the developments in healthcare during the nineteenth century. The radical transformation of medicine in Europe included the admission of women as doctors and the increased numbers of specialised institutions such as asylums. Such developments were also influenced by wider social, economic, political and cultural backgrounds these are also examined.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/history-science-technology-and-medicine/history-medicine/health-disease-and-society-scottish-influence-the-19th-century/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 20 Feb 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/history-science-technology-and-medicine/history-medicine/health-disease-and-society-scottish-influence-the-19th-century/content-section-0">Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014