Studying religion
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/a103_7
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Subject
Course An Introduction to the Humanities
To An Introduction to the Humanities
Relates to course An Introduction to the Humanities
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2013-01-01T00:00:00.000Z
  • 2013-10-17T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2014-02-20T09:31:20.000Z
  • 2014-07-21T16:01:58.000Z
  • 2014-07-30T12:02:07.000Z
  • 2014-07-31T16:01:36.000Z
  • 2014-08-01T15:02:02.000Z
  • 2014-08-04T14:31:51.000Z
  • 2014-08-18T15:01:39.000Z
  • 2015-09-03T08:31:38.000Z
  • 2015-12-11T10:01:48.000Z
  • [...]
There are 3 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2015 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Studying religion
Title Studying religion
Description
  • <p>This course will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of religious studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India, and will compare the ways in which boundaries are drawn (or not drawn) between what is held to be &#x2018;religious’ and &#x2018;non-religious’ in two different societies.</p><p>The aim of this course is to explore three key questions:</p><ol class="oucontent-numbered"><li><p>Why study religion?</p></li><li><p>What is religion?</p></li><li><p>How should religion be studied?</p></li></ol><p>The course begins with a series of video clips on religion in Liverpool.</p><p>This free course is an adapted extract from the Open University course A103 <i>An introduction to the Humanities</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/arts-and-humanities/index.htm"><b>subject area</b></a></span><b>.</b></p><div class="oucontent-box oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box &#10; oucontent-s-noheading&#10; "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><p>The Open University is conducting a survey investigating how people use the free educational content on our OpenLearn website. The aim is to provide a better free learning experience for everyone. So if you’re a regular user of OpenLearn and have 10 minutes to spare, we’d be delighted if you could take part and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9G5JS2Y"><b>tell us what you think</b></a>. Please note this will take you out of OpenLearn, we suggest you open this in a new tab by right clicking on the link and choosing open in a new tab.</p></div></div></div>
  • <p>This unit will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of religious studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India, and will compare the ways in which boundaries are drawn (or not drawn) between what is held to be &#x2018;religious’ and &#x2018;non-religious’ in two different societies.</p><p>The aim of this unit is to explore three key questions:</p><ol class="oucontent-numbered"><li><p>Why study religion?</p></li><li><p>What is religion?</p></li><li><p>How should religion be studied?</p></li></ol><p>The unit begins with a series of video clips on religion in Liverpool.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course A103 <i>An introduction to the Humanities</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/arts-and-humanities/index.htm"><b>subject area</b></a></span><b>.</b></p><div class="oucontent-box oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box &#10; oucontent-s-noheading&#10; "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><p>The Open University is conducting a survey investigating how people use the free educational content on our OpenLearn website. The aim is to provide a better free learning experience for everyone. So if you’re a regular user of OpenLearn and have 10 minutes to spare, we’d be delighted if you could take part and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9G5JS2Y"><b>tell us what you think</b></a>.</p></div></div></div>
  • <p>This unit will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of religious studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India, and will compare the ways in which boundaries are drawn (or not drawn) between what is held to be &#x2018;religious’ and &#x2018;non-religious’ in two different societies.</p><p>The aim of this unit is to explore three key questions:</p><ol class="oucontent-numbered"><li><p>Why study religion?</p></li><li><p>What is religion?</p></li><li><p>How should religion be studied?</p></li></ol><p>The unit begins with a series of video clips on religion in Liverpool.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course A103 <i>An introduction to the Humanities</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/arts-and-humanities/index.htm"><b>subject area</b></a></span><b>.</b></p><div class="oucontent-box oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box &#10; oucontent-s-noheading&#10; "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><p>The Open University is conducting a survey investigating how people use the free educational content on our OpenLearn website. The aim is to provide a better free learning experience for everyone. So if you’re a regular user of OpenLearn and have 10 minutes to spare, we’d be delighted if you could take part and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9G5JS2Y"><b>tell us what you think</b></a>. Please note this will take you out of OpenLearn, we suggest you open this in a new tab by right clicking on the link and choosing open in a new tab.</p></div></div></div>
  • This free course, Studying religion, will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of Religious Studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 01 Jan 2013 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0">Studying religion</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2013
  • <p>This unit will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of religious studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India, and will compare the ways in which boundaries are drawn (or not drawn) between what is held to be &#x2018;religious’ and &#x2018;non-religious’ in two different societies.</p><p>The aim of this unit is to explore three key questions:</p><ol class="oucontent-numbered"><li><p>Why study religion?</p></li><li><p>What is religion?</p></li><li><p>How should religion be studied?</p></li></ol><p>The unit begins with a series of video clips on religion in Liverpool.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course A103 <i>An introduction to the Humanities</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/arts-and-humanities/index.htm"><b>subject area</b></a></span><b>.</b></p><div class="oucontent-box oucontent-s-heavybox1 oucontent-s-box &#10; oucontent-s-noheading&#10; "><div class="oucontent-outer-box"><div class="oucontent-inner-box"><p>The Open University is conducting a survey investigating how people use the free educational content. The aim is to provide a better free learning experience for everyone. If you have 10 minutes to spare, we’d be delighted if you could take part and <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/M2BFMJJ"><b>tell us what you think</b></a>.</p></div></div></div>
  • <p>After studying this course, you should be able to:</p><ul><li><p>discuss some of the ways in which the concept of &#x2018;religion’ has been and is used in the study of religion;</p></li><li><p>have gained some practical experience in the study of religion through exploring examples of religious activity in Britain and India on &#x2018;special days’;</p></li><li><p>be able to identify and to evaluate critically the motives, concerns and methods that typically distinguish the academic study of religion known as religious studies from other approaches to religious belief and practice.</p></li></ul>
  • This free course, Studying religion, will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of Religious Studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 01 Jan 2013 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0">Studying religion</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2013
  • <p>This unit will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of religious studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India, and will compare the ways in which boundaries are drawn (or not drawn) between what is held to be &#x2018;religious’ and &#x2018;non-religious’ in two different societies.</p><p>The aim of this unit is to explore three key questions:</p><ol class="oucontent-numbered"><li><p>Why study religion?</p></li><li><p>What is religion?</p></li><li><p>How should religion be studied?</p></li></ol><p>The unit begins with a series of video clips on religion in Liverpool.</p><p>This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course A103 <i>An introduction to the Humanities</i>, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/arts-and-humanities/index.htm"><b>subject area</b></a></span><b>.</b></p>
  • <p>This course will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of religious studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India, and will compare the ways in which boundaries are drawn (or not drawn) between what is held to be &#x2018;religious’ and &#x2018;non-religious’ in two different societies.</p><p>The aim of this course is to explore three key questions:</p><ol class="oucontent-numbered"><li>Why study religion?</li><li>What is religion?</li><li>How should religion be studied?</li></ol><p>The course begins with a series of video clips on religion in Liverpool.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/arts-and-humanities?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Arts and Humanities</a></span>.</p>
  • This unit will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of Religious Studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 17 Oct 2013 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0">Studying religion</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2013
  • This free course, Studying religion, will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of Religious Studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0" /> First published on Tue, 23 Feb 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/religious-studies/studying-religion/content-section-0">Studying religion</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
Dataset OpenLearn