. . . "263-4" . "2016-04-25T11:06:47+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-08-01T14:35:14+01:00"^^ . . . "Bedfordshire"@en . . . . . "Sergei Prokofiev" . . . . "259-60" . "2015-11-30T14:53:41+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-07-09T11:42:40+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "Am Rhein, am Rhein, da wachsen uns're Keben" . . "Am Rhein, am Rhein, da wachsen uns're Keben"@en . . . . . . "February, 1810"@en . . . . . . "27 April, 1983"@en . . . . . "What we would give to our beloved" . . . "What we would give to our beloved"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'unknown music'"@en . . . "Tbilisi"@en . . "Tbilisi"@en . . . . . . "24 March, 1953"@en . . . . . "

\r\n

2nd time in a week I've been blown away by @Ldn_Sinfonietta. #radiorewrite @THSHBirmingham tonight was stunning,great performances all round

"^^ . "

\r\n

2nd time in a week I've been blown away by @Ldn_Sinfonietta. #radiorewrite @THSHBirmingham tonight was stunning,great performances all round

"^^ . "excerpt from 'London Sinfonietta Audience Tweets' (21 words)"@en . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Fidelio'"@en . . . "Mass in D" . "Mass in D"@en . . . "Various Lay-vicars"@en . . . "funeral anthem for George II" . "funeral anthem for George II"@en . . . . . . . . . "performance of ''Les Noces''"@en . . . . . . "performance of 'Concerto Grosso'"@en . . . . "Sonata in B flat minor" . . "Sonata in B flat minor"@en . . . . . "between at the end of 1893 and at the end of 1893"@en . . . . "134" . "2015-12-20T09:27:53+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "2015-11-30T21:42:32+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "

Irmgard Seefried and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf singing (mainly) German Lieder - usually with Gerald Moore. Lisa Della Casa singing, in particular, Brahms'  \"Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer\". Hans Rosbaud conducting the BBC Symphony Orchestra magisterially in a completely modern concert - Schoenberg, Webern, Berg, Blacher etc. - in such a way that it sounded like music. Clifford Curzon playing Mozart's 24th Piano Concerto with Harry Blech and the London Mozart Players in several successive years.

"^^ . "excerpt from 'Southbank Centre Archive' (74 words)"@en . . . . "7" . "The location was Standish V. A. Hospital, a Red Cross auxiliary hospital. 'The men' were convalescing soldiers."@en . . . . . . "Mon: 14th \r\nThe men gave a sing song. It was very amusing. The melancholy Corpl. sang comic songs, one man played most wonderfully on a mouth organ. I never knew before what a mouth organ could do. \r\n"@en . . "2014-03-03T15:45:17+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Armide'"@en . . . "Horses" . "Horses"@en . . . . "Recit and Air Penseroso" . . "Recit and Air Penseroso"@en . . . . "Italian opera" . . "Italian opera"@en . . . . . "

Weekend with Sylvia in Lancaster for Homer premiere, maximally rehearsed and replete with good will. Yet I was taken aback, not hearing it through their ears. The chorus of fifty was composed of amateurs, the three soloists were mediocre, and the eight instrumentalists were toneless.

"^^ . "78" . "excerpt from 'Lies: A Diary 1986-1999' pp. 78 (45 words)"@en . . . . "Concerto in A minor" . . "Concerto in A minor"@en . . . . "The Paris Diary: Paris 1954" . . . . . "The Paris Diary: Paris 1954"@en . . . . "Double Concerto" . . "Double Concerto"@en . . . . . "

Sunday 26th Feb. 1967 and the first appearance on the concert platform in the UK, perhaps anywhere, of Otto Klemperer after he fell asleep with a cigarette alight and nearly burned himself to death. He appeared from the left, the audience errupted as he was helped up the steps to the platform. Then in the most amazing emotional atmosphere, the New Philharmonia and Klemperer performed Mahlers 9th Symphony, whose fourth movement Klemperer has described as \"the majesty of death\". An incredible unforgettable evening at the Royal Festival Hall.

"^^ . "excerpt from 'Southbank Centre Archive' (87 words)"@en . . . . . "between 1768 and 1769"@en . . "Baltimore"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Classical & Jazz'"@en . . . . "German Requidm" . . "German Requidm"@en . "Jean-Auguste-Dominique" . . "Ingres" . . . . . . "male" . . . . "Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres"@en . . . . "2016-01-26T12:47:06+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "I'd come over [to the UK] as a young musician from Australia with one purpose. To see my idols, Sergio Celibdache and Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli play with the LSO. The Ravel G Major Concerto and Faure's Requiem were on the program. The Festival Hall was bursting with people amazed the pianist had actually turned up, and the music was wonderful. I've been back 500 times since!\r\n"@en . . "2014-09-28T09:12:31+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "Elizabeth Codner" . . . . "48" . "2015-10-16T15:02:21+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-03-11T15:49:33+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Quartettsatz for clarinet, violin, cello & piano'"@en . . . . . "B flat sonata" . . "B flat major"@en . "B flat sonata"@en . . . . . "

Friday, 25 (London).--We began, as usual, at four. A few days since, one who lived in known sin, finding heavy conviction broke away and ran out, she knew, not whither. She met one who offered her a shilling a week to come and take care of her child. She went gladly. The woman's husband hearing her stir between three and four began cursing and swearing bitterly. His wife said, \"I wish thou wouldest go with her, and see if anything will do thee good.\" He did so. In the first hymn God broke his heart and he was in tears all the rest of the service. How soon did God recompense this poor woman for taking the stranger in!

"^^ . "273" . "excerpt from 'The Journal of John Wesley' pp. 273 (119 words)"@en . . . . "368-369" . "2016-01-13T15:07:51+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "2016-01-05T16:50:40+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "

\r\n

Back from the #Gruppen gig by @Ldn_Sinfonietta, what an amazing night. 2nd performance more than welcome.

"^^ . "

\n

Back from the #Gruppen gig by @Ldn_Sinfonietta, what an amazing night. 2nd performance more than welcome.

"^^ . "excerpt from 'London Sinfonietta Audience Tweets' (17 words)"@en . . . . "2015-10-15T13:21:53+01:00"^^ . "2015-10-14T11:29:42+01:00"^^ . "John Evans-Pughe (1925 to 1996) was a chorister (with his younger brother Tom) at the choir of the College of St Nicholas, Chislehurst, under Sir Sydney Nicholson and later a music scholar at Kings School Canterbury, Kent. The St Nicholas choir was recorded for many BBC broadcasts and for Columbia Records. A Columbia recording in 1939 featuring John Evans-Pughe and Michael Lumb as treble soloists singing O Lovely Peace (Handel) and Brother James’ Air (arr. Jacob) was a best seller. \r\nJohn did National Service in Egypt and Greece, and then studied science at Trinity College, Dublin. He went on to became an electronics engineer for Marconi Space and Defence Systems, continuing with music in his spare time.\r\n"@en . . . . . . . . . "2015-09-15T12:50:38+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "Soirée dans Grenade" . . "Soirée dans Grenade"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Hymn of Praise'"@en . . . . . "

Until I began to learn to play the piano I expressed no desire to learn, although I did feel a certain interest in music. Sometimes when a quartet was playing next door I would listen with my ear to the wall.

"^^ . "

Until I began to learn to play the piano I expressed no desire to learn, although I did feel a certain interest in music. Sometimes when a quartet was playing next door I would listen with my ear to the wall.

"^^ . "11" . "excerpt from 'Dmitry Shostakovich-About Himself and His Times' pp. 11 (41 words)"@en . "excerpt from 'Dmitry Shostakovich-About Himself and His Times' (41 words)"@en . . "second lieutenant"@en . . . . . . "25 May, 1984"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'in vain'"@en . "Washington D. C."@en . . . . "Sian Edwards"@en . . . . . "

\r\n

\r\n

When Pasta came, later in the year, she produced Anna Bolena, an opera by Donizetti, in which another tenor made his appearance, Rubini, who soon became, and still continues, a great favourite. He possesses one of the sweetest of voices, of great flexibility, and is an excellent singer, but too fond of the over-florid style now so much in fashion. Lablache also performed in this opera. I heard them all three at a private concert sing some of the pieces from it, as a kind of trial, preparatory to bringing it out for Pasta’s benefit. They did not please me, being of a forced, unnatural style;

"^^ . "207-8" . "excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 207-8 (108 words)"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Variations on the St Anthony Chorale, Op 56a'"@en . . . . "45-47" . "Harry Lester was a Leicestershire stocking-maker who, Gardiner tells us, helped to direct the music at the church in the village of Sheepshead."@en . . . . . . . . . . "Lester was a man of a very superior mind, wrote excellent letters, and was a poet as well as musician. At Christmas-time he always furnished a copy of verses which were performed in the church. I remember one of these carols was set to music by Webbe, the celebrated glee-composer; my father set another, and, for a variety, at Lester’s request, one was composed for a full orchestra by myself. On the Monday the voices and instruments took a circuit round the town, and performed the carol at the principal houses, where they were not only regaled with good Christmas cheer, but presented with contributions towards maintaining the choir. These performances were so respectable, that as a treble boy, in the year 1782, I was invited to assist, and sang the song out of the Messiah, 'But thou didst not leave his soul in hell,’ accompanied on the violin by a stranger of the name of Young. I was charmed by the tone of his instrument, and particularly when he sounded the third string in union with the open second, the piece being in the key of A. In addition to the church performances, these musicians of the forest were in the habit of singing the best of our English glees, with a taste and expression rarely equalled in a country village. "@en . . "2014-04-09T09:37:41+01:00"^^ . . . . . "355" . "2016-01-26T12:57:31+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "Donald Gramm came over today to rehearse our \"segment\" on WNCN's marathon tomorrow."@en . . "2015-06-29T13:31:22+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Povero Calpigi'"@en . "Dr" . "Dr King" . . "King" . . . . "Dr."@en . "Dr King"@en . . . "Wolkow"@en . . . . . . "19 May, 1994"@en . . . . . . . "performance of 'Unknown'"@en . . . . "Sonata in A flat" . . "Sonata in A flat"@en . "Aldeburgh"@en . "Mr" . "Mitford" . . . . "Mr Mitford"@en . . . . . . . . "Life and Reminiscences of Sir George J. Elvey" . . . . . "Life and Reminiscences of Sir George J. Elvey"@en . . . "Markus Seidler"@en . . . . "Mount Sinai" . . "Mount Sinai"@en . "Minna Constance" . "Muz"@en . . "Lee" . . . . . "female" . "Minna Constance Lee"@en . "Muz"@en . . . . "64-5" . "2015-10-28T16:42:37+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-10-06T15:34:39+01:00"^^ . . . . . "Overture" . . "Overture"@en . . . "Letter from Sir Richard Wingfield to Cardinal Wolsey, 27 May 1520" . . . . . "Letter from Sir Richard Wingfield to Cardinal Wolsey, 27 May 1520"@en . . . . "20" . . . . . . . . "...I met with Mr. Lock and Pursell, Maisters of Musique; and with them to the Coffee-house into a room next the Water by ourselfs. Here we had variety of brave Italian and Spanish songs and a Canon for 8 Voc:, which Mr. Lock had newly made on these words: Domine salvum fac Regem, an admirable thing. Here, out of the window it was a most pleasant sight to see the City from [one] end to the other with a glory about it, so high was the light of the Bonefires and so thick round the City, and the bells rang everywhere."@en . . "2014-08-05T23:57:56+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "
It was at the suggestion of Malibran that [Sir Julius] Benedict left Paris and 
went to England in 1835. He quickly made his mark as an operatic composer, and
successfully competed with Michael Balfe and Vincent Wallace in the race for
fame. Like them, he wrote and produced many operas; like them, he left only one
that really promises to survive. Indeed, Benedict's \"Lily of Killarney\" is the
sole English opera of the so-called \"ballad\" type that still shares popularity
with \"The Bohemian Girl\" and \"Maritana.\" Although such a mediocre conductor, he
was an admirable accompanist. He had studied under Hummel at Weimar before going
to Weber, and was a quite capable pianist. His reputation in this capacity was
not a little enhanced by his association with Jenny Lind on her memorable tour
in the United States (1850-52). At any rate, after his return to London his
services \"at the piano\" were in request at every kind of musical function, and
he was practically the sole accompanist employed at the Monday Popular Concerts \r\nduring the first twenty years of their existence.
"^^ . "14-15" . "excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 14-15 (180 words)"@en . "Rome"@en . . . "My Buddy" . "My Buddy"@en . . "Morrissey"@en . . . . "142" . . . . . . . . . . "2015-04-21T13:32:21+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "Boughton" . . . . "unspecified" . . "unspecified"@en . . . . . . . . "performance of 'pianoforte quartet in F minor'"@en . . "Sonny Boy Williamson"@en . . . . "122" . "2016-04-23T21:53:10+01:00"^^ . "Excerpt from 'Svetskoye Iskusstvo', 17 Jan., 1947."@en . . . . . "2016-01-02T21:11:34+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "

I also discovered in the same village a primitive instrument: a long reed-whistle, with six holes and a cut-in tongue. A kind of primitive oboe! It actually gives a whistle-like sound, just like any ordinary pipe (or bagpipe), but it has no bag. It is blown directly from the mouth. There is only one old man in the village who can play it. It is called cărabă; however, that’s also the name given to the ordinary bagpipe in these parts. It’s rather interesting that this old man with the cărabă is also a quack-doctor and his healing rites include blowing a certain melody (pentru betesug) on his instrument.

"^^ . "

\n

I also discovered in the same village a primitive instrument: a long reed-whistle, with six holes and a cut-in tongue. A kind of primitive oboe! It actually gives a whistle-like sound, just like any ordinary pipe (or bagpipe), but it has no bag. It is blown directly from the mouth. There is only one old man in the village who can play it. It is called cărabă; however, that’s also the name given to the ordinary bagpipe in these parts. It’s rather interesting that this old man with the cărabă is also a quack-doctor and his healing rites include blowing a certain melody (pentru betesug) on his instrument.

"^^ . "116" . "excerpt from 'Béla Bartók Letters' pp. 116 (114 words)"@en . . . . . . "26 December, 1716"@en . . . . . . "93" . "2015-08-17T14:23:53+01:00"^^ . "Possibly a morning or afternoon experience. Rather a 'rehearsal' than a 'performance'."@en . . . . . . . . . "2014-06-20T19:45:56+01:00"^^ . . . "http://solomon.tinyurl.alexanderstreet.com/15JO0%20"^^ . . "British and Irish Women's Letters and Diaries 1500-1950"@en . "2013-12-06"^^ . . . . "342" . . . . . . . . . "2015-05-18T13:04:53+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "

Dr. Burney (no mean authority) said, Gluck was the Michael Angelo of living composers, and called him the simplifying musician. Salieri told me, that a comic opera of Gluck's being performed at the Elector Palatine's theatre, at Schwetzingen, his Electoral Highness was struck with the music, and inquired who had composed it ; on being informed that he was an honest German who loved old wine, his Highness immediately ordered him a tun of Hock.

"^^ . "253" . "excerpt from 'Reminiscences of Michael Kelly' pp. 253 (74 words)"@en . . . . "74" . "2016-03-10T12:02:27+00:00"^^ . "As a teenager, Richard Church listens to a girl practising scales on the piano"@en . . . . . . . . . "2015-10-26T21:08:38+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Sonatas by Corelli'"@en . "performance of 'Sonatas by Corelli (, performance of)'"@en . . . "Prussian National Airs" . "Prussian National Airs"@en . . . "2015-12-08T18:57:10+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "2015-09-30T14:13:51+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "Symphony" . . "Symphony"@en . . . . "93" . "2015-11-16T17:05:42+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "In the course of this Diaghileff season at the Théatre des Champs-Elysées I at last had an opportunity of seeing 'Parade', the work of Cocteau, Satie, and Picasso, the production of which in 1917 had been the subject of so much discussion. Although I had played the music on the piano, seen photographs of the scenery and costumes, and was intimately acquainted with the scenario, the performance gave me the impression of freshness and real originality. 'Parade' confirmed me still further in my conviction of Satie’s merit in the part he had played in French music by opposing to the vagueness of a decrepit impressionism a precise and firm language stripped of all pictorial embellishments. "@en . . "2015-06-20T16:26:10+01:00"^^ . . . . . "Signor Colista"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of ' second Overture to Leonora'"@en . "performance of 'second Overture to Leonora'"@en . . . . "Jeux" . . "Jeux"@en . "Denver"@en . . . "piano music played by Mendelssohn" . "piano music played by Mendelssohn"@en . . . . . . . . . "Rumanian Dances" . . . . . "performance of 'Rumanian Dances'"@en . . . "unspecified piano trios" . "unspecified piano trios"@en . . . "Gottlob! ein Schritt zur Ewigheit" . "Gottlob! ein Schritt zur Ewigheit"@en . . . "unknown music" . "unknown music"@en . . . . "410" . . . . . . . "Yesterday I preached here in the morning, & (after a good peck) went with my landlord to Cotesbatch, & preached about idle words to Dr. Marriott, after a great treat on the harpsichord by Miss Greatorex, who was come thither, luckily, to teach. The good people were so civil as to press us to drink tea with them, so after dinner we all went & had a very pleasant afternoon, & I took my fiddle & accompanied (do you hear, Richard?) Miss G. & the two Miss Marriotts, who play well, very well indeed. I assure you this was a treat to me, especially as it was quite unexpected. "@en . . "2014-02-07T18:47:56+00:00"^^ . . . . . "112-113" . "2015-09-01T10:25:29+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "Later, when I showed up in New York, I found him [James P. Johnson] there, and I met Lippy, too, his dear friend, his pal… James was doing pretty good [but] he never lost contact with his foundations, with the real, wonderful people in Harlem. Harlem had its own rich, special folklore…\r\n\r\nSo there in that atmosphere I became one of the close disciples of the James P. Johnson style. Some nights we'd wind up--James, Fats Waller, Sonny Greer, and I--and go down to Mexico's to hear The Lion… So we would sit around, and during intermission I would move over to the piano. Then it would be Fats. Perhaps he'd play \"Ivie.\" (He dedicated that to Ivie Anderson, I think.) Afterwards, he'd look over his shoulder jovially at James and call, \"Come on, take the next chorus!\" Before you knew it, James had played about thirty choruses, each one different, each one with a different theme.\r\n\r\nBy then The Lion would be stirred up. James had moved into his territory and was challenging. \"Get up and I'll show you how it's supposed to be done,\" he'd say. Then, one after the other, over and over again they'd play, and it seemed as though you never heard the same note twice… They played some impossible things, toe to toe, a saber in each hand-En garde!\r\n"@en . . "2015-04-17T21:09:44+01:00"^^ . . "Will" . . "Hewer" . . . . . . . "male" . "Will Hewer"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Black Box Music'"@en . . . . . . "5 May, 1985"@en . . "Music critic"@en . . . . "21-22" . "Performance took place in Domus tent in Cheltenham's Imperial Gardens"@en . . . . . . . . "I have recently become interested in jazz, and have invited a few jazz-playing friends to come and join me in the done for an experimental jazz concert, to give some variety to our week's programming. So in the evening, the Dome is transformed by microphones, wine bottles, and a red standard lamp on the stage. Maggie Nichols, Roger Dean and Ashley Brown arrive from London and we decide on a blend of straight and free jazz, which suits me very well, though I feel that the others would be happier doing free jazz all evening. But the blend is evidently the right thing for the Cheltenham Audience, and there are one of two juxtapositions - such as the opening one between Rogers and Hart's 'I Could Write a Book' and the free improvising which follows it, and the one between a frenetic improvisation and Maggie's slow ballad 'Touching Faces' - which quite absorb the audience. It's always the juxtaposition between the known and the unknown which sets people thinking, and if it's skilfully done, as Maggie does it this evening, the listeners can really be wooed into attentiveness to something they wouldn't normally consider listening to. "@en . . "2014-04-29T16:30:57+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'The Santa Fe Songs'"@en . . . . "Strinasacchi"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'The exorcism in the fourth act of Le Prophete'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Herbert von Karajan'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Concerto'"@en . . "Hilary M. Thomas"@en . . . . "Mendelssohn songs" . . "Mendelssohn songs"@en . . . . . "

A Dave Brubeck concert in the late 50s which turned me into a jazz lover for life.

"^^ . "excerpt from 'Southbank Centre Archive' (17 words)"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Safe in the Arms of Jesus'"@en . . . . "music by Otto Luening" . . "music by Otto Luening"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'The Amen chorus form the Messiah'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'The Foundry, Op 19'"@en . "Authuille"@en . . . "St Peter's, Stepney"@en . . "St Peter's, Stepney"@en . . . . . . "August, 1841"@en . . . "Risler"@en . . . . . "

My first visit to the Festival Hall was in Jan 1955 to see 'Where the Rainbow Ends' with Alicia Markova and Anton Dolin. I was 11 years old and the visit was organised by my school - 'The Rocen [?] School' Greenwich. I was fascinated by the sight of the auditorium and the excitement and anticipation before the performance. The ballet was magical and a little bermusing for a child from the suburbs. London was a rather drab place in the 50s, but the Festival Hall seemed from my first encounter to be a place to enjoy sounds and emotions and joy and magic. I still have the programme after 50 years. I became an enthusiastic concert goer and look forward to the next 50 years. 

"^^ . "excerpt from 'Southbank Centre Archive' (121 words)"@en . . . "The Band of the King's Hussars"@en . . "Music teacher"@en . . . . "40" . "2015-12-20T15:29:15+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "The LPO played for various festivals before the war and I particularly enjoyed the one in Norwich in the summer of 1936. The town in delightful, the weather was good and with various concerts at different times and places throughout the day the atmosphere was sociable and pleasant. ... Astra Desmond, one of the most musically intelligent of the oratorio singers of her day. She was the soloist in the first performance of Vaughan Williams' \"Five Tudor Portraits\", conducted by Heathcote Statham. The words are by the Elizabethan poet, Thomas Skelton, and it is strange to think that some of them were considered too racy both by the choir and the audience."@en . . "2015-03-20T17:07:46+00:00"^^ . . . . . "856" . . . . . . . . "[...] so to Whitehall and sent my coach round, and I through the park to chapel, where I got in up almost to the rail and with a great deal of patience, stayed from 9 at night to 2 in the morning in a very great Crowd; and there expected, but found nothing extraordinary, there being nothing but a high Masse. The Queen was there and some ladies. But Lord, what an odde thing it was for me to be in a crowd of people, here a footman, there a beggar, here a fine lady, there a zealous poor papist, and here a Protestant, two or three together, come to see the show. I was afeared of my pocket being picked very much. Their music very good endeed, but their service I confess too frivolous, that there can be no zeal go along with it; and I do find by them themselfs that they do run over their beads with one hand, and point and play and talk and make signs with the other, in the midst of their Messe. "@en . . "2014-08-15T21:38:28+01:00"^^ . . . . . "2016-02-03T14:52:58+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "2015-09-02T10:47:14+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "112" . "2016-02-02T12:08:50+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-07-13T22:03:09+01:00"^^ . . . . "Continuo"@en . "Basso continuo"@en . . . . . "

After supper we amused ourselves on two pianos, and at last had a grand improvisation together, in which Felix was so inspired that in my enthusiasm I almost forgot my own part in listening to him.

"^^ . "328-329" . "excerpt from 'Recent Music and Musicians' pp. 328-329 (36 words)"@en . . . . . . "1808"@en . . . "Teach the Children & Wooden Ships" . "Teach the Children & Wooden Ships"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Fugues'"@en . . . "Goodbye Virginia" . "Goodbye Virginia"@en . . . . "Ralph Reader"@en . . . . "Domus Diary: Wormwood Scrubs, Thamesmead and Battersea" . . . . . "Domus Diary: Wormwood Scrubs, Thamesmead and Battersea"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Antimasque dance'"@en . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Am Rhein, am Rhein, da wachsen uns're Keben'"@en . "Queen's House"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'music by Lee Hoiby'"@en . . . . . "

\r\n

@Ldn_Sinfonietta world premiere of Steve Reich's #RadioRewrite @southbankcentre - loved it

"^^ . "

\n

@Ldn_Sinfonietta world premiere of Steve Reich's #RadioRewrite @southbankcentre - loved it

"^^ . "excerpt from 'London Sinfonietta Audience Tweets' (12 words)"@en . . . . . "

My newish Surge Illuminare (\"Arise, Shine\") had its first NY perf. on the 5th at Saint Thomas Church.

"^^ . "253" . "excerpt from 'The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem 1973-1985' pp. 253 (18 words)"@en . . . . "201" . "2015-11-16T16:37:06+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "Before my arrival, Shostakovich had been listening to Boris Tishchenko play through his gigantic new Fourth Symphony. Shostakovich had praise for the third, fourth and fifth movements, but was rather more reserved about the first and second movements. He said: I'm not generally very talkative. I don't like engaging in analysis and conversation about works I have heard, and I'm not good at it. All I do is listen to music that is presented to me. I either like it, or I don't. That's all.'"@en . . "2015-05-20T15:07:33+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of '2 Duets'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Linguae ignis'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "329" . "2015-09-19T10:06:33+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "Letter from Bunsen to a son, 13th February, 1854 -\r\nAt the Queen's dinner-table, soon after this, the Princesses Helena and Louisa, and Prince Arthur, were allowed to come in and stand by the Queen, as it was a feast day. In the evening there was very fine music in St. George's Hall (the\r\nTriumphal Symphony of Beethoven), and the Princess Royal, Princess Alice, the Prince of Wales, and Prince Alfred, were allowed to stay up to hear it, sitting to the right and left of the chairs where sat the Queen and Prince Albert, and the\r\nDuchess of Kent."@en . . "2015-06-14T14:37:46+01:00"^^ . . . . "Foreign violinists in Brunswick" . "Foreign violinists in Brunswick"@en . . . . . "

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It was my privilege to hear ERNST before he had lost his cunning, nor shall I ever hear his like again. He played once at Her Majesty's Opera House, when the whole assembly seemed to dream through a performance of the \"Hungarian Airs.\" The lightest whisper of the violin controlled the house; the magician hardly stirred his wand at times, and no one could tell from the sound when he passed from the up to the down bow in those long cantabile notes which had such power to entrance me.

"^^ . "31" . "excerpt from 'My Musical Life' pp. 31 (90 words)"@en . . . . "Le Prophete final act" . . "Le Prophete final act"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of '3 Volkstexte (Three Traditional Rhymes) for soprano & ensemble, Op.17'"@en . . . . "251" . . . . . . . "On the very first evening Emily played the first and second movement of Mozart's 'Quintet in E fiat, major;' she has studied it thoroughly in the three days, and certainly is very gifted by nature."@en . . "2015-05-05T10:50:55+01:00"^^ . . . . "Anthem on Christmas Day" . "Anthem on Christmas Day"@en . . . "Mr. Surman"@en . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Unspecified songs'"@en . "Bulgaria"@en . . . . . "162" . "Performance took place at La Fenice."@en . . . . . . . . "The Twentieth-Century Music Festival continues. In the evening attended the second performance of the Britten opera (which Virgil calls \"The Screw of the Century\") with Denise Bourdet and \"drove\" her home in a gondola to the Bestigui Palace. In Munich last winter Peter Pears had already warned me that the little girl's role would be taken by a lady-midget of forty. Of course it was a flop. Why not a boy dressed up as a girl? At those ages there is little difference! "@en . . "2014-04-21T20:01:48+01:00"^^ . . . . "2016-01-11T18:19:10+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-10-12T13:37:38+01:00"^^ . . . . "housewife"@en . . . . "2016-02-04T11:08:44+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . "2015-10-05T16:35:56+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "Mood Indigo" . . "Mood Indigo"@en . . . . . "

In September, 1827, we embarked on board the steamer at the Tower stairs for Rotterdam [...] As soon as we had dressed I repaired to the cathedral, and was just in time for the morning service. On entering, at the eastern end, I had a full view of the organ, which so much surpassed in magnitude anything of the kind I had seen before, that for a while I was at a loss to conjecture even at what I was looking. The massive columns of silver rising from the floor up to the roof, and filling up the whole width of the middle aisle, was a spectacle without parallel. The sounds did not correspond with the appearance, as but few stops were used, and those not of a quality to be admired.

"^^ . "532-533" . "excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 532-533 (130 words)"@en . . . "366" . "2015-10-25T07:07:11+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . "The public quite as numerous, but very intelligent and appreciative. I have seldom played better ; my pieces the same as last evening: Beethoven's Sonata in C. Op. 53, Thalberg and de Beriot, Heller's Truite, and the Finale of Lucia by Liszt. The duet pleased so well that part of it had to be repeated, and after Liszt's Fantasia I had to play Mendelssohn's 'Volks' and 'Fruhling's Lied' as an encore. The whole evening, as well as the drive there and back, was very pleasant, and reconciled me to the whole undertaking. \r\n"@en . . "2015-04-28T22:17:56+01:00"^^ . . . . . "275" . "2015-09-22T13:12:37+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "At the latter end of the autumn, Mr. (now Sir Walter) Parratt, his successor at St. George's, begged him to come over and play the farewell services on his \" dear old organ \" before it was altered. This he did, and gave for the last time his splendid rendering of his brother's Service in A, and Boyce's anthem, \" Oh, where shall wisdom be found ?\r\n"@en . . "2015-06-03T09:32:32+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Polifonica - monodia - ritmica'"@en . . . . "144-146" . "2015-11-15T12:24:42+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-11-14T23:50:26+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "II Talismano" . . "II Talismano"@en . . . "Russian music" . "Russian music"@en . . . . . . "17 June, 1921"@en . . . . . . "15 April, 1894"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Light music for violin and piano'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Supper Time'"@en . . . . . "

In Rome, early 1954, when Elliott Carter's First String Quartet was played, I'd never heard anything like it before, and told him it sounded like the end of the world. To this day is incised on my brain the device, in the Adagio, of two impassioned muted violins juxtaposed with the savage viola and cello - a device devised by Ives in The Unanswered Question (disparate simultaneity), and, before that, in Nuages, where Debussy's Cor Anglais rends the cloudily indifferent strings. 

"^^ . "183" . "excerpt from 'Lies: A Diary 1986-1999' pp. 183 (80 words)"@en . . . . . "289-291" . "2016-01-03T18:07:04+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "18th of March, 1787, [we] arrived in London for the first time in my life. On the same evening, Stephen Storace and myself called upon Mr. Linley at his house in Norfolk Street in the Strand, where I found his accomplished daughters, Mrs. Sheridan and Mrs. Tickell. Mrs. Sheridan asked me if I had \r\nseen \" Richard Coeur de Lion,\" in Paris ; and on my telling her that I had, only four evenings before, she requested me to go and see it at Drury Lane that evening, as she was most anxious to know my opinion of the relative merits of the French and English pieces. General Burgoyne had translated it,- and Mrs. Sheridan adapted it to the English stage. I and Storace, accompanied by a young gentleman, set off for the theatre, but the piece was nearly half over. I must premise, that I was then totally uninformed as regarded the actors and \r\nactresses at Drury Lane. Just as we entered the boxes, Richard was singing the romance from his prison, most loudly accompanied from behind the \r\nscenes by two French horns ; I was astonished to hear an accompaniment so completely at variance with the intention of the composer, and which entirely spoiled the effect of the melody, nor did I think much of the vocal powers of the royal captive; and turning to Storace, said, \"If His Majesty is the first and best singer in your theatre, I shall not fear to appear as his competitor for public favour.\" Storace laughed, and told me that the gentleman who upon that special occasion was singing, was Mr. John Kemble, the celebrated tragedian, who, to serve the proprietors, had undertaken to perform the part of Richard, as there was no singer at the theatre capable of representing it. However, as I was not gifted with intuition, my mistaking him for the principal vocalist of the \r\ntheatre was natural enough, having a few days back seen Philippe, the first singer at the French theatre, perform the same part. My friend Kemble laughed heartily when he was told that I had mistaken him for the Drury Lane Orpheus. By the way, I heard that when Kemble was rehearsing the romance, sung by Richard, Shaw, the leader of the band, called out from the orchestra, \" Mr Kemble, my dear Mr. Kemble, you are murdering time.\"\" Kemble, calmly and coolly taking a pinch of snuff, said, \" My dear Sir, it is better for me to murder time at once, than be continually beating him as you do.\" Mrs. Jordan's acting in this drama was delightful, and the Laurette of Mrs. Crouch most interesting. \r\nI was struck with admiration of her wonderful beauty, and delighted to hear that she was to be my prima donna in the opera in which I was to perform. She seemed to me to aggregate in herself, like the Venus of Apelles, all that was exquisite and charming. I agreed with Mr. Linley for the remainder of the season at Drury Lane, and to make my debut in the part of Lionel, on Friday, \r\nthe 20th of April, 1787. "@en . . "2015-05-19T17:49:44+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Haydn Symphony'"@en . . . . . . . "8-9" . "2015-09-18T10:48:20+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "2015-06-10T15:30:16+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "Letter from John Constable to C. R. Leslie, 9 Sept 1831" . . . . . "Letter from John Constable to C. R. Leslie, 9 Sept 1831"@en . . . . "Piano Sonata Op. 31 No. 1" . . "Piano Sonata Op. 31 No. 1"@en . . . . . . . . "Hugh Reginald Haweis"@en . . . . . "Abbe Gelinck" . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Coppélia'"@en . . . . "2016-02-04T10:23:46+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . "2015-09-03T12:32:47+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "performance of 'The Ballet from 'The Perfect Fool''"@en . . . . . "

So the experience of an orchestra is different from that of its audience... and the prelude to a performance of Strauss' Ein Heldenleben with a Beecham or a Karajan is very different from that preceding a concert which includes Mozart's G Minor Symphony with a Menuhin or a Monteux. It must be remembered, also, that the sudden revelation at the start of either of these concerts is no revelation at all for the members of the orchestra. They have rehearsed this performance...

"^^ . "9-10" . "excerpt from 'In the Orchestra' pp. 9-10 (82 words)"@en . "Dwight Lyman" . . "Moody" . . . . . . . . "male" . . . . "Dwight Lyman Moody"@en . . . "Sitting in the dark" . "Sitting in the dark"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of ''In case of delirium''"@en . . . . . . "26 January, 1988"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Irish melodies'"@en . . . . . "

 

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it will surprise many to know that the [Boston Jubilee] orchestra numbered quite a thousand—with the patriotic Ole Bull at the head of the violins, and Carl Rosa playing at the same desk. Gilmore had engaged all the principal sopranos of Boston, constituting a “bouquet of artistic singers.” These were placed on a special raised balcony between the orchestra and the chorus, and they sang in unison the obligato parts as they occurred in the choral pieces.

"^^ . "192" . "excerpt from 'Recollections of an old musician' pp. 192 (81 words)"@en . . . "Mikhail Tabakov"@en . "Nursery rhyme"@en . . . . "267-268" . "2015-09-01T13:35:44+01:00"^^ . "Ron Lorman recalling working for Miles Davis in an interview with Chris Murphy for his own memoir of working for Davis 1973-1983. "@en . . . . . . "After I left him [Miles Davis] in '87 I saw him a couple of times at different various shows and such, and we were very friendly, always cordial, and it was always good to see each other. But we were fairly distant at that point. Somewhere around, I don't know, just before he passed away [in 1991], when he did the Montreaux show for Quincy [Jones], I ended up putting that show together for Quincy and Miles... \r\nThat was an amazing show. That was the hardest ... in the seven years I worked for him, that was the hardest show I've seen him do…\r\n He [Miles Davis] was reading charts, he was like, he was pulling notes that he hadn't pulled in ... that he hadn't tried to look for in thirty years ... that kind of thing. And he didn't have to ... prior to that I think he did the Paris show where it was a tribute to Miles, with McLaughlin and everybody came on stage. And you know, Miles played on that show, and Miles, well ... he needed to be Miles at that point, be the center stage attraction. But on the Montreaux show, he and Quincy were, were reaching for music that needed to be reached and they, thank god they did it, but it was, it took a lot of work.\r\n"@en . . "2015-05-05T11:08:32+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "

[My] younger brother, Max, had shown considerable aptitude for the violin, and was taking lessons from Louis Ries, the well-known \" second violin \" of the Monday \"Pops.\" Afterward he studied under the late J. T. Carrodus, and joined the orchestra of the Royal Italian Opera, Covent Garden, of which Carrodus was for many years the chef-d'attaque. I used to play Max's accompaniments in the family circle; and it was solely the fraternal spirit of emulation, impelling me to try to shine side by side with my younger brother, that led me to keep up my study of music.

"^^ . "22-25" . "22-23" . "excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 22-23 (97 words)"@en . "excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 22-25 (97 words)"@en . . . . . "

 

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In these classic soirees of ours, we have played every composition for strings worth playing; and have given also special sets of concerts where only the most modern works, like the Brahms sextettes, Bruch, Goldmark, and Rubinstein, were played. We also gave for many seasons the so-called popular Saturday night concerts; for which we secured other artists to play septettes, octettes, and nonettes of mixed wind and string instruments. Nearly every pianist of distinction played repeatedly with us; among them were Mr. William Scharfenberg, Otto Dresel, Ernst Perabo, J. C. D. Parker, B. J. Lang, Hugo Leonard, Gustav Satter, J. Trenkle, John L. Hatton, and Miss Fay (now Mrs. Sherwood).

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Singers also helped us in large numbers. One was Mile. Caroline Lehman, sister of our flute player, who came from Copenhagen and sang with us two seasons. Other vocal assistants were Mrs. J. H. Long, Mrs. Went worth, Mrs. Harwood, Miss Addie S. Ryan, Mrs. H. M. Smith, Adelaide Phillips, and Annie Louise Cary—all good singers. I think it can be safely said that the Mendelssohn Quintette Club has done its share in cultivating a taste for music, especially chamber music.

"^^ . "103-4" . "excerpt from 'Recollections of an old musician' pp. 103-4 (193 words)"@en . . . "Cantata Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet, BWV212" . . "Cantata Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet, BWV212"@en . . . "Benno Moiseiwitsch"@en . . . "Hull"@en . "Hull"@en . . . "Unspecified" . "Unspecified"@en . "http://welshjournals.llgc.org.uk/browse/viewpage/llgc-id:1277425/llgc-id:1281449/llgc-id:1281452/get650"^^ . . "Welsh Journals Online"@en . "2013-12-02"^^ . . . . . . "357" . . . . . . . . . "I went with Lady Glenbervie to a Signor di Negri, one of the nobles of Genoa. He is a poet, an improvisatore, and a musician…. Signor Negri improvisèd at our request. It was the first time I ever heard verse poured forth in spontaneous numbers….I admired his talent, though I did not think his subject well chosen. He played well on the harp…. I do not think he excels in any of the accomplishments he professes, but he loves them all with the ardour peculiar to his country….What a pity it is that those who are endowed with the mechanical power of skill in small things, often lack the enthusiasm and feeling which others, who have less handicraft and head, possess in such a pre-eminent degree. Lady C. C[ampbell] sang a Scotch song to him in return, which he did not much care for, because the words were not particularly fine, and he regards music only as the vehicle of poetry."@en . . "2013-12-05T11:56:47+00:00"^^ . . . . "Walter Wardroper"@en . . . . . . "16 May, 1803"@en . . . "Longman Orme, Brown & Longman"@en . . . . "67" . "Neil Weir served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders."@en . . . . . . . " We then advanced once more and reached the crossroads at Longueval at the same time as the Black Watch on our right. And this is where the officers come in, i.e. to re-organise and get the men to consolidate. Which we did.\r\n ...When my Company got disorganised when moving on the objective I got Wilson, the piper, to play the Regimental March, which he did in grand style, thus reassembling the Company."@en . . "2014-08-14T14:01:13+01:00"^^ . . . . . "9-10" . "2015-12-19T18:39:41+00:00"^^ . "Footnote: Ethel Smyth was rehearsing her setting for voice and orchestra of her friend Henry Brewster's metaphysical poem 'The Prisoner' which shortly afterwards had its first performance in Edinburgh under her baton prior to its London performance."@en . . . . . . . . . "2015-10-14T16:16:26+01:00"^^ . . . "Maurice" . "Grosser" . . . . . . . . . "male" . . . . "Maurice Grosser"@en . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Chopin'"@en . . . . . "The souls of the righteous" . . . "The souls of the righteous"@en . "Lady" . . "Edgecumbe" . . . . "female" . "Lady Edgecumbe"@en . . . "unspecified swing and jazz" . "unspecified swing and jazz"@en . . . "Miss Wood"@en . . . . "332-333" . "2016-01-11T17:02:37+00:00"^^ . . . "Édouard Risler and Lucien Capet the Frenchmen, Toscanini the Italian, bringing Beethoven in its purest form to Germany; the miracles that the non-Latin Koussevitzky works with a score like Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloe; a purebred New Englander like George Copeland or the German Gieseking capturing the very essence of Debussy’s impressionism; Bruno Walter re-creating for us the devout Catholic mysticism of Bruckner – all these men proved to me that, especially in our domain, racial and national theories and prejudices that proclaim the predisposition of any one race or nation toward a given realm of art are completely invalidated. "@en . . "2015-06-16T14:40:33+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "8 September, 1770"@en . . . . "2016-02-04T11:12:40+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . "2015-09-06T12:11:00+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Sea Drift'"@en . . . . . "

Imagine Joachim's feelings when in the evening, as he presented Hauptmann to the King, he had to hear His Majesty say to the delighted composer : \" Ah, my dear Mr. Hauptmann, I am so glad to make your personal acquaintance. ... I have always been a great admirer of your excellent compositions. . . . There is especially a Sonata . . . I think it is in G ... which I am particularly devoted to. ... Such a lovely Adagio . . . Joachim must always play it twice to me; isn't that so, Joachim?\" Of course, poor Joachim not only had to bow his assent, for the King could not have seen that, but audibly to express it!

"^^ . "50-51" . "excerpt from 'Musings & memories of a musician' pp. 50-51 (107 words)"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "I went to King Arthur last night, which is exceeding fine... the inchanted part of the play, is not Machinery, but actual magick: the second scene is a British temple enough to make one go back a thousand years, & really be in ancient Britain: the Songs are all Church-musick, & in every one of ye Choruſ's Mrs Chambers sung ye chief part, accompanied with Roarings, Squawlings & Squeakations dire; the Frost Scene is exceſsive fine; the first Scene of it is only a Cascade, that seems frozen; with the Genius of Winter asleep & wrapt in furs, who upon the approach of Cupid, after much quivering, & shaking sings the finest song in the Play: just after, the Scene opens, & shows a view of arched rocks coverd with Ice & Snow to ye end of ye Stage; between the arches are upon pedestals of Snow eight Images of old men & women, that seem frozen into Statues, with Icicles hanging about them & almost hid in frost, & from ye end come Singers, viz: Mrs Chambers, &c: & Dancers all rubbing their hands & chattering with cold with fur gowns & worsted gloves in abundance; there are several more beautiful Scenes; but rather than describe 'em, I ought to beg pardon for interrupting your happineſs so long, and conclude myself.\r\n"@en . . "2013-12-27T21:58:35+00:00"^^ . . . . . "Stokowsky"@en . . . . "11-12" . "2016-02-23T13:47:00+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "From this time, the young Kammermusicus was in full activity. His duties consisted in playing at the Court – concerts and in the Theatre, for which latter, a French operatic and dramatic company had been engaged shortly before. I therefore became earlier acquainted with the French dramatical music than with the German; and this was not without influence upon the tendency of my taste, and upon my compositions of that time. At last, during the two fairs, a German operatic company from Magdeburgh was also engaged, and the grandeur of Mozart’s operatic music burst upon me. Mozart now became for my life time my ideal and model. Even now I well remember the transport and dreamy enchantment with which I heard for the first time, the “Zauberflöte” and “Don Juan”; and that I had no rest until I had got the scores lent to me, and had brooded over them half the night long."@en . . "2014-08-31T12:14:37+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "

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Between 1925 and 1935 I did not dare to read or to listen to Mahler’s music. I was afraid that my aversion to it in a preceding period might return. Fortunately, when I heard in Los Angeles a moderately satisfactory performance of the Second [Mahler's Second Symphony], I was just as enchanted as ever before; it had lost none of its persuasiveness.  

"^^ . "

Between 1925 and 1935 I did not dare to read or to listen to Mahler’s music. I was afraid that my aversion to it in a preceding period might return. Fortunately, when I heard in Los Angeles a moderately satisfactory performance of the Second [Mahler's Second Symphony], I was just as enchanted as ever before; it had lost none of its persuasiveness.  

"^^ . "264" . "excerpt from 'Arnold Schoenberg Letters' pp. 264 (62 words)"@en . . . . "Paul Hillier"@en . . . . "388-389" . . . . . . . . "Spohr's Symphony for double orchestra, 'Irdisches und Göttliches,' has a subject worthy of a Beethoven; but the artificial construction cramps the free outpour of feeling."@en . . "2015-05-24T12:39:17+01:00"^^ . . . . "Diary of Dorothea Crewdson, 28 Sept. 1916" . . . . . "Diary of Dorothea Crewdson, 28 Sept. 1916"@en . . . . . . "9 November, 1819"@en . "Journalist"@en . . . . "Huddersfield Ladies Choir"@en . . . . . . "6 March, 1934"@en . . . . . . . "performance of 'pop music'"@en . . . . . "Offenbach" . . . . . "

As a matter of fact the theatrical bands of this metropolis can stand comparison, favourably to themselves, with those of any Continental city. I venture to make this assertion somewhat confidently, having, in the course of the past twenty years, attended every imaginable sort of theatrical performance in all the countries of Europe, except the Scandinavian kingdoms and the Hellenic realm... Of course bands engaged to play ballet music and the accompaniments of comic opera, operetta, etc., are expected to be of a quality superior to that of the average theatrical orchestra. But the latter, in London at least, has attained so high a standard as to leave little to be desired.

"^^ . "274" . "excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 274 (112 words)"@en . . . "Regimental band"@en . . . . "105" . "2015-08-18T15:59:11+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2014-06-22T20:09:27+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "60" . "2015-09-25T15:45:32+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "Soon after the Rev. Mr. Schrick called on me to select anything new in music that I had to offer. On hearing this piece he expressed his pleasure with it, and stated that Mrs. Elvina M. Hall had written some words which he thought would just suit the music."@en . . "2015-05-13T14:35:12+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "

I love David del Tredici's new wild Pot Pourri for chorus, soprano, rock band and large orchestra. But what I love there he ignores. I hear long lines where he intends jerks, laughs where he asks for tears.

"^^ . "12" . "excerpt from 'The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem 1973-1985' pp. 12 (38 words)"@en . "Suite (music)"@en . . "political theorist"@en . . . . "264" . . . . . . . "All has gone off well. Fanny played the harmonium nicely and the singing was capital. The congregation were delighted and some of them could hardly believe their ears and the Squire said nothing for or against, but he came to Church twice."@en . . "2014-03-25T12:15:02+00:00"^^ . . . "George Wein & The Newport All-Stars"@en . "Claremont (country house)"@en . . . . "278" . "2016-01-03T17:56:30+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "The Storaces and myself, by appointment, went to pay our respects to Raff, the justly celebrated tenor, esteemed by far the finest singer of his day, and for many years the delight of Naples and Palermo. He was by birth a Bavarian, and had retired to Munich with an ample fortune; he was past seventy, and did us the favour to sing to us his famous song, composed by Bach, \" Non so donde viene,\" though his voice was impaired, he still retained his fine voce di petto and sostenuto notes, and pure style of singing. \r\n"@en . . "2015-05-14T15:06:59+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Polly'"@en . . . "L'habit du Comte De Grammont" . "L'habit du Comte De Grammont"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Don Giovanni'"@en . "https://archive.org/stream/thirtyyearsofmus00kleiuoft#page/34/mode/2up"^^ . . "2015-08-07"^^ . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Llwyn Onn'"@en . . . . "Prokofiev's Classical Symphony" . . "Prokofiev's Classical Symphony"@en . . . . "395" . "2016-04-25T14:08:18+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "2015-07-25T18:27:46+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "114" . "2015-09-25T16:34:02+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "A young man who came from Sweden writes : \" ' I Am Praying for You ' was the first Moody and Sankey hymn I ever heard. It was on a cold winter night up in the land of the midnight sun, more than a quarter of a century ago. Two evangelists had come to the neighbourhood, but found it difficult to get a place in which to hold their meetings. At last a poor woman opened for them her log house, consisting of two rooms. From house to house the meetings were announced. I was a small boy, and out of curiosity I attended the first meeting. About twenty people were present, seated on chairs borrowed from the neighbours. At one end of the low, dark room the evangelists were seated, by a small table on which two home-made candles were burning. After one of the evangelists had led in prayer, he said to the other, ' Sing one of Sankey's hymns.' Upon which he sang this now well-known hymn, ' I am Praying for You,' accompanying himself on a guitar."@en . . "2015-05-19T13:14:20+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Latin jazz'"@en . . . "British music" . "British music"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'unknown music'"@en . . . . . . "7 December, 1912"@en . "Lavinia" . "Church" . . . . . . "female" . . . "Lavinia Church"@en . . . . . "260-261" . . . . . . . . "The concert was brought to a close with the Battle of Vittoria, at which the majority of the audience went wild; I, on the contrary, was painfully grieved to find Beethoven, whom Provi­dence has perhaps destined for the highest throne in the musical hierarchy, moving on the plane of the coarsest materialists. [...] When the orchestra all but capsized in the tumultuous riot of drumming, pounding, and rattling, and I expressed to Herr Sonnleithner my distaste over the boisterous applause, he remarked in a mocking tone that \"most people would like it even better if the beating were extended to their own eardrums\". The concert was under the direction of Umlauff; Beethoven stood at his side and beat time together with him. His beat was mostly false, however, owing to his deafness, but no mishap occurred inasmuch as the orchestra watched only Umlauff's indications.\r\n"@en . . "2015-03-09T14:56:29+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "2 December, 1934"@en . . . . . . "in the beginning of 1921"@en . . "Ophicleide"@en . . "audio engineer"@en . . . . "89-90" . "2016-02-23T13:20:04+00:00"^^ . "Spohr’s impressions of his future wife, Dorette Scheidler’s harp-playing in Gotha, August 1805."@en . . . . . . . . "In the introductory visits I made to the members of the orchestra I was received most cordially by the Court-singer Madame Scheidler. She introduced me to her daughter Dorette, of the age of eighteen, of whose skill upon the harp and pianoforte I had already heard much. In this charming blondine I recognised the girl whom I had seen on my first visit to Gotha, and whose pleasing form had since then frequently recurred to my memory. At the Concert which I then gave in that town, she had sat in the first row of the auditory, by the side of a female friend, who upon my appearance, astonished at so tall a figure, exclaimed rather louder than she had intended: “Just look, Dorette, what a long hop-pole!” Upon hearing this exclamation, my eye fell upon the girls, and I saw Dorette blush with embarrassment. With a similar graceful blush she now again stood before me, probably recollecting that circumstance. To put an end therefore to a situation so painful to me, I entreated her to play something on the harp. Without the least affectation she complied with my wish.\r\n\r\nWhen a boy, I had myself once made an attempt to learn the harp, and took lessons of one Herr Hasenbalg in Brunswick, when I soon got so far as to be able to accompany my songs. But after my voice had broken, and that for a considerable time I remained without any voice at all, the harp was neglected, and at length wholly laid aside. My predilection for that instrument had nevertheless remained the same; and I had given my attention to it sufficiently long, to know, how difficult it is, if one would play more than mere accompaniments upon it. My astonishment and delight may therefore be imagined, when I heard so young a girl execute a difficult “Fantasia” of her instructor Backofen, with the greatest confidence, and with the finest shades of expression. I was so deeply moved that I could scarce restrain my tears. Bowing in silence, I took my leave; - but my heart remained behind! Irresistibly impelled, my visits now became frequent, and my reception more friendly every time. \r\n"@en . . "2014-10-16T13:52:12+01:00"^^ . . . "Boy soprano"@en . . . . "93-94" . "2015-08-27T14:11:33+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-03-27T13:38:07+00:00"^^ . . . . "tutor"@en . . . "Herr Winter"@en . . . "Bekranzt mit Laub" . "Bekranzt mit Laub"@en . . . . . "

My functions at the subscription concerts were of a different nature. I had taught myself the violin up to a certain degree, in the hope of being enrolled as an amateur second violin, but it so happened that the gentleman who played the kettle-drums left the town, and I, although seven years old, was considered so good a time- keeper that my father promoted me to that important and dangerous post. And for eight years did I hold it, though not altogether to my credit ; for although I found no difficulty in coming in at the right time, perhaps on the third beat after fifty-seven bars' rest, I could never accomplish a satisfactory roll, hard as I laboured at it. The kettle-drum is not exactly an instrument suited to a drawing-room, so I could get no practice, and I remember even now how I envied and admired the drummers of any military band that passed through our town, recognising them by far my superiors.

"^^ . "5-6" . "excerpt from 'Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)' pp. 5-6 (164 words)"@en . . . . . "

Well, it was in the winter of 1868 that [Eugen] Franck invited me to come and pay him a little visit, holding out to me, as a special inducement, the pleasure of meeting a young Englishman who, with his mother and two charming sisters, was spending the year in Berlin for the purpose of studying the piano under Carl Tausig. Needless to say I accepted with alacrity. The meeting between the young Englishman and me, at a supper-party arranged for the occasion by our mutual friend, developed in the course of the evening into something like an Olympic contest. Evidently bent on doing credit to his master, the young Englishman, a striking looking, handsome boy of sixteen, with finely-cut features and very pleasant manners, played wonderfully well, thus spurring me on to do my best when my turn came. So we went on, actually for hours, he playing and I singing, to the great delight of our host, who, equally interested in us both, confessed to being baffled as to which of us in his opinion had the greater talent, until, at the end of a most enjoyable evening, he had to be satisfied with declaring that both Frederic Cowen-- for that was the boy's name-- and I had the chance of a brilliant future before us : a future which, alas, at the time I am writing, has turned into a past, though, I am sure, one we neither of us two old friends need be ashamed of. 

"^^ . "25-26" . "excerpt from 'Musings & memories of a musician' pp. 25-26 (247 words)"@en . . . . . . . "23 July, 1953, 12:00 AM"@en . . . . . . "performance of 'A Christmas Dance: Sir Roger de Coverley'"@en . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Dream of Gerontius'"@en . . . . "119" . "2016-04-23T20:25:57+01:00"^^ . "'Fujara' is an instrument resembling a flute. "@en . . . . "2015-12-14T16:03:30+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'vocal music'"@en . . . . "symphony no 8" . . "symphony no 8"@en . . "Ray Charles"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "Edmund Rubbra"@en . . . . . . "26 January, 1930"@en . . . . "Mendelssohn's Serenade and Allegro" . . "Mendelssohn's Serenade and Allegro"@en . . . . . "

At Mr. Neat's soirée, I heard a piano-forte trio of this author, in Bb, accompanied by the clarionet and violoncello, but I like it better with th viollin.

"^^ . "691" . "excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 691 (29 words)"@en . . . . . . "27 August, 1856"@en . . . "Donald Tovey"@en . "18th Kings Liverpool" . . "Battalion" . . . . . "male" . "18th Kings Liverpool Battalion"@en . . . . "'Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand'" . . "'Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand'"@en . . . . "215" . "2015-12-20T08:36:25+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-11-01T12:33:12+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "Ansani"@en . . . . . . "26 November, 1953"@en . . . . "Sembianza amabile del mio bel sole" . . "Sembianza amabile del mio bel sole"@en . . "Oberlin, Ohio"@en . . . . "285" . "2015-09-17T16:24:15+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "Letter from Bunsen to his wife, Berlin: Tuesday 23rd October, 1827\r\nTo give an account of my time, I shall mention having been at the Opera on Saturday — we had the 'Euryanthe' of Weber, a splendid piece; Sontag sang the\r\nwhole well, and much of it exquisitely. It is terrible to behold how the society of Berlin, with few exceptions, revolves round the theatre as the sole attraction and occupation !"@en . . "2015-06-09T09:50:09+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "10 February, 1800"@en . . . . . "233" . "2016-02-02T15:36:34+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-07-23T10:03:58+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'G Minor Fantasia and Fugue'"@en . . . . "'Polovtsian Dances' from Prince Igor" . . "'Polovtsian Dances' from Prince Igor"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'quartette'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Symphonic Studies'"@en . . . "Music at the Lord Mayor's Day Dinner" . "Music at the Lord Mayor's Day Dinner"@en . . . . . "Five centuries of music in Venice" . "0500015031"^^ . . "Five centuries of music in Venice"@en . . . . . "Suite from the Middle Ages" . . "Suite from the Middle Ages"@en . . . . "280" . "2016-04-25T10:56:46+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "2015-08-01T15:15:06+01:00"^^ . . . . . "Cantata No. 212, 'Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet' 'Peasant Cantata', BWV 212 (arr. Henry Wood) No. 20 Aria 'Dein Wachstum sei feste und lache vor Lust!'" . . "Cantata No. 212, 'Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet' 'Peasant Cantata', BWV 212 (arr. Henry Wood) No. 20 Aria 'Dein Wachstum sei feste und lache vor Lust!'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Rory O'More'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'German Hymn Tunes'"@en . . . . . . "26 September, 1980"@en . . . "The Mulberry Tree" . "The Mulberry Tree"@en . . . . . "
After spending a delightful summer, which was productive both of pleasure and 
profit, I returned to London about the end of September 1807. On the 3rd May,
1808, Mr. Cumberland produced, at Drury Lane Theatre, a piece entitled \"The
Jew of Mogadore,\" to which I composed the music: It was with great reluctance
that the Board of Management at Drury Lane accepted it : therefore, when I had
finished the music of the first act, I rested upon my oars until I knew their
final determination. I met Mr. Sheridan one day in Essex Street in the Strand,
and told him of it. He desired me to go on with it by all means ; \"For,\" said
he, \"if the opera should fail, you will fall with a fine classical scholar,
and elegant writer, as well as a sound dramatist,\" (such was his expressed
opinion of Cumberland's abilities.) \"Go, instantly,\" continued he, \"to those
discerning critics, who call themselves the Board of Management, and tell \r\nthem, from me, if you please, that they are all asses, to presume to sit in
judgment on the writings of such a man as Cumberland ; and say, further, that
I order the opera to be accepted, and put into rehearsal.\" \"And pray, Sir,\"
said I, \"in what light am I to view this ' Board of Management?' What are \r\nthey?\" \"Pegs to hang hats upon,\" said Sheridan. I went to the pegs,
communicated Mr. Sheridan's command, and the opera was performed accordingly-
Braham sang in it charmingly.
"^^ . "237-238" . "excerpt from 'Reminiscences of Michael Kelly' pp. 237-238 (250 words)"@en . . . . "42-4" . "2016-04-24T15:47:07+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-08-03T14:38:51+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "

It was during the summer of [1787], that the commemoration of Handel took place. The last grand performances given at Westminster Abbey were on the 28th and 31st of May, the 1st and 4th of June : upon those four mornings, I sang there, but to give an idea of the effect of that magnificent festival is far beyond my power; indeed, it has already been described most elaborately by those more competent to the task. I can only endeavour to express the effect which it produced on me. When I first heard the chorus of the Hallelujah, in the \" Messiah,\" and \" For unto us a child is born,\" my blood thrilled with rapturous delight it was sublime ; it was, in the inspired words of the chorus, \"Wonderful.\" The orchestra was led by the Cramers ; the conductors were Joah Bates, Esq. father of the present secretary of the Tax Office, Drs. Arnold and Dupuis. The band consisted of several hundreds of performers. The singers were Madame Mara, Storace, Miss Abrams, Miss Poole, Rubinelli, Harrison, Bartleman, Sale, Parry, Norris, myself, &c. and the choruses were collected from all parts of England, amounting to hundreds of voices. The King, Queen, and all the royal family sat opposite the orchestra ; the body of the church, the galleries, and every corner crowded with beauty, rank, and fashion : such was the rage to procure seats, that ladies had their hair dressed the night previous, to be ready to get to the Abbey in good time. The performers unanimously exerted their great talents to admiration; but what made an everlasting impression on me was, the powerful effect produced by Madame Mara, in the sublime recitative, \" Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously ;\" in that Her voice was heard around, Loud as a trumpet with a silver sound. I have often sung with her the recitative tenor part, \"And Miriam the Prophetess took a timbrel in her hand;\" and never heard her but with increased delight. No place could be more appropriate to give effect to the divine strains of Handel, than the spacious Abbey. His Majesty 's partiality for Handel's music was generally spoken of ; but I believe it was not universally known what an excellent and accurate judge he was of its merits. The fine chorus of \" Lift up your heads, O ye gates,\" was always given in full chorus, and indeed intended to be so given by Handel. The King suggested that the first part of it should be made a semi-chorus, and sung only by the principal singers ; but when it came to the passage, \" He is the King of Glory !\" he commanded that the whole orchestra, with the full chorus, should, with a tremendous forte, burst out ; the effect produced by the alteration was awful and sublime. A strange coincidence happened at one of the performances: the morning, during part of the grand selection, was cloudy and lowering; but when the grand chorus struck up \" Let there be light, and light was over all !\" the sun burst forth, and with its rays illuminated every part of the splendid edifice. Every one was struck with the coincidence, and the effect produced by it.

"^^ . "298-300" . "excerpt from 'Reminiscences of Michael Kelly' pp. 298-300 (531 words)"@en . . . . . . . "performance of 'Chamber Symphony No. 1, Op. 9'"@en . . . . "125" . "2015-09-01T10:31:51+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "Bubber Miley was from the body and soul of Soulsville. He was raised on soul and saturated and marinated in soul. Every note he played was soul filled with the pulse of compulsion. It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing was his credo. Before he played his choruses, he would tell his story, and he always had a story for his music, such as: \"This is an old man, tired from working in the field since sunup, coming up the road in the sunset on his way home to dinner. He's tired but strong, and humming in time with his broken gait--or vice versa.\" That was how he pictured \"East St. Louis Toodle-oo.\"\r\n\r\nBoth Miley and Whetsol painted pictures in music, one in one style and one in another. They spoke different languages, and though the listener didn't understand their language, he believed everything they had to say.\r\nHis [Bubber’s] growl solos with the plunger mute were another of our early sound identities, and between 1925 and 1929 he laid the foundation of a tradition that has been maintained ever since by men like Cootie Williams and Ray Nance.\r\n"@en . . "2015-04-17T21:44:29+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'When Irish eyes are smiling'"@en . . "lexicographer"@en . . . . . . "1 July, 1906"@en . . . . . . "3 September, 1872"@en . . . . "The Quintet Club"@en . . . . "63" . "2015-10-29T12:12:30+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "2015-10-18T18:53:41+01:00"^^ . . . "Mrs." . "Viney" . . . . "female" . "Mrs. Viney"@en . . . . . . . "6 May, 1933, 08:45 PM"@en . . . . "London Contemporary Music Centre, at Cowdray Hall London. London premieres of the Honegger and Milhaud quartets."@en . . . . . . . . . . "In contrast with most musical audiences this seemed to consist of people who looked both intelligent and happy. There were as many women as men and all ages, tho' there were not many who looked to be under 30.\r\n"@en . . "2014-03-04T15:47:01+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "in the middle of 1833"@en . . . . "107-108" . . . . . . . . "This evening there is a ball at the French Embassy. Madame L'Ambassadeur receives the guests at the top of the staircase....\r\n\r\nIn the ballroom, beneath the Georgian plasterwork, jazz music is raging. From the wall Louis XIV, the irreplaceable King of France, within the ermine and azure of his cloak, is careful not to smile.\r\n"@en . . "2014-03-12T14:38:20+00:00"^^ . . . . "second Chaconne" . . "second Chaconne"@en . . . . "Syringa" . . "Syringa"@en . . . . . . "10 May, 1885"@en . . "Nicola Matteis"@en . . . . . . . "performance of 'Song Cycle'"@en . . . . "83" . "2016-01-11T18:45:15+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "I think one of the greatest conductors was Weingartner who was one of the most courteous of men. He conducted the Schubert 'Unfinished Symphony' and the Beethoven 'Pastoral' when we played in Vienna again and was very anxious for us to go to supper with him afterwards. I think his conducting was something apart, something beyond this world, but he had great gaiety too. "@en . . "2015-05-18T23:03:40+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "1944"@en . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Cavalleria Rusticana'"@en . . . . "326" . "2015-12-18T17:05:23+00:00"^^ . "'Hilary' refers to Hilary Machen, his wife Marion, children and friends who were all on holiday in Dorset near STW at this time."@en . . . . . . . . . "2015-09-29T13:36:13+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "4 December, 1912"@en . . . "Names have been redacted at the request of the Philharmonia Orchestra"@en . . . . . . . . "Dear Mr Salonen\r\nI was present at the performance of Mahler's Resurrection Symphony at the Anvil, Basingstoke, on June 22. I simply wanted to thank you, and the orchestra and soloists and choir, for such a magnificent performance it was hugely moving and powerful.\r\nIn all my life, and I have been attending concerts for many years, I have never seen the audience give a standing ovation such as we saw last night! It was truly well deserved and an evening to be remembered for all time.\r\n"@en . . "2014-05-06T17:22:56+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "

TO: The Rev. J and Mrs. Evans-Pughe,  Tovil Vicarage, Maidstone, Kent

\r\n

FROM: John Evans-Pughe, 14073964 l/Cpl Evans Pughe, S.I.C. c/o A.P.O SALONIKA

\r\n

DATE: November 20 1947

\r\n

…It’s just 1 o’clock now and we’re just listening to the commentary on the Wedding (of Princess Elizabeth and Philip, Duke of Edinburgh).  We get the B.B.C. European service very well here at all times of the day.  It’s also dinner time now so I shall stop now, and perhaps write more after dinner…

\r\n

\r\n

…The time is now just after 2 o’clock.  The Wedding Service is just finishing – the singing was very good.  They are just playing God Save the King again for about the 6th time.  The choir are now singing “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ”.  I suppose we’ll see it all at the cinema in a few day’s time…

"^^ . "excerpt from 'Letters of the Evans-Pughe family' (167 words)"@en . . "Bologna"@en . . . . . "

I heard two tremendous concerts of Bülow's lately. Oh, I do hope you'll hear him some day! He is a colossal artist. I never heard a pianist I liked so well. He has such perfect mastery, and yet such comprehension and such sympathy. Among other things, he played Beethoven's last Sonata. Such a magnificent one as it is! I liked it better than the Appassionata.

"^^ . "195" . "excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 195 (66 words)"@en . "Oliver C" . "@oliverleith"@en . "Leith" . . . . "@oliverleith"@en . "Oliver C Leith"@en . . . . . "performance of 'Popular'"@en . . . "Edward Mountagu"@en . "Robert" . . "Portal" . . . . . . "male" . "Robert Portal"@en . "Holyhead"@en . . . "Ruth Laredo"@en . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'French Horn Duets'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'In the rough blast heaves the billows'"@en . . . . . . "January, 1646"@en . "Scottish Highlands"@en . . . . "40" . "2016-01-31T23:51:23+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "Rain. As a switch, a late Beethoven quartet is piped through the mikes as we board Continental flight 144 for Newarl, but this music is irksome as the usual rock fare. Who wants any music - even mine, even yours - at such trying moments?"@en . . "2015-07-08T00:47:00+01:00"^^ . . . . "Unknown Female"@en . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Piano concertos'"@en . . . . "84-85" . "2015-11-16T17:03:58+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "All the early part of 1920 was filled with excitement, feverish activity, and continual travel necessitated by preparations for the performance of 'Pulcinella', which was given at the Opera on May 15. I had to go to and fro between Morges and Paris, where my presence was constantly required either to hear singers and rehearse them, or to follow closely the choreographic rehearsals in order to spare Massine unpleasant misunderstandings of the sort already described. / Although all this was very tiring, I enjoyed taking part in a task which ended in a real success. 'Pulcinella' is one of those productions- and they are rare- where everything harmonizes, where all the elements – subject, music, dancing, and artistic setting- form a coherent and homogeneous whole. "@en . . "2015-06-20T16:03:31+01:00"^^ . . . . . "137,138" . "2015-11-12T13:57:47+00:00"^^ . "Letter from Felix Mendelssohn to Carl Friedrich Zelter, Director of the Berlin Singakademie and Mendelssohn’s former teacher (1758-1872), Munich, June 22, 1830."@en . . . . . . . . "2015-02-23T09:41:38+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Es fangt schon an zu dammern'"@en . "Peter" . . "Smart" . . . . . . . . "male" . "Peter Smart"@en . . . "Egon Petri"@en . . . . "'T'Aint Whatcha Do" . . "'T'Aint Whatcha Do"@en . . "Florent Schmitt"@en . . "air force pilot"@en . . . . "205" . "2016-01-21T01:09:14+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-06-10T22:41:20+01:00"^^ . . . "Tyrone, Pennsylvania"@en . . . . "Andante" . . "Andante"@en . . . . . "Frederick Arthur Gore Ousley" . . . . . . "25 October, 1825"@en . . . "2015-11-14T22:36:12+00:00"^^ . "2015-11-14T22:35:11+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . "2015-11-12T16:52:43+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "35" . . . . . "And Now It is all over! I am sitting up in bed alone. All (or most of) the others have gone to a Debate, but I haven't because I'm so tired. Mummy, Pop, & Beth & the car arrived at 2.15, & they are staying the night at the Feathers. I go out for a drive with Beth & Mummy, to Cromer & then come home for tea at the F. Then we go to the Recital. It goes very badly! My thing is not [Britten crosses out the word 'not'] quite well appreciated but not understood Dr Hendrie is ill & doesn't sing my song! I go back to dinner at Feathers & return in time for prayers 8.30"@en . . "2014-03-07T10:17:29+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'unknown jazz piano'"@en . . . "concert party" . "concert party"@en . . "WW2 servicemen"@en . . . . "Hungarian Fantasia" . . "Hungarian Fantasia"@en . . "John Hatton"@en . . . "Signora Bertinotti"@en . . . "The Duke of Cambridge"@en . . . . . "

I went dejectedly to my room, turned on the wireless.  It was Monteux conducting the 9th. The applause is still tempesting on as I write.  Never have I heard such infallible tempi, nor singers inspired to such fire.  never have I heard such applause, breaking in like a finale to the final chords. Freude, Schöner Götterfunken...Oh, it is true! In his 89th year, Monteux proves it. He gave such life, such fluency to his singers that even in the barking passage they didn't bark, they clamoured.

"^^ . "285-286" . "excerpt from 'The diaries of Sylvia Townsend Warner' pp. 285-286 (89 words)"@en . . . "Unknown" . "Unknown"@en . . . . . "

On the 12th, visit to Paul Jacobs in his marvellous new apartment on Riverside Drive, he played me Busoni; after which dined tête-à-tête chez Lenny Bernstein and spent the next six hours examining his weird, semi-successful cycle Songfest.

"^^ . "200" . "excerpt from 'The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem 1973-1985' pp. 200 (41 words)"@en . . . . "45" . "2016-04-22T21:32:19+01:00"^^ . "Letter from Arnold Schoenberg to Arthur Nikisch. Berlin, 31 January 1914."@en . . . . . . . . "2015-12-01T14:36:48+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . "

Paris has fallen - has been abandoned.  My father used to make a face at the Schubert Marche Militaire because it was to that tune the Germans marched into Paris in the war of '70.

"^^ . "103" . "excerpt from 'The diaries of Sylvia Townsend Warner' pp. 103 (35 words)"@en . . . . "Listener's Daughter"@en . . . "Diary of Samuel Pepys, 29 May 1669" . . . . . "Diary of Samuel Pepys, 29 May 1669"@en . . . . "Letter from Baroness Bunsen to her daughter Frances, 15 July 1846" . . . . . "Letter from Baroness Bunsen to her daughter Frances, 15 July 1846"@en . . . . "99" . . . . . . . "[The fisherman] was busy with his nets, and they chaffed him, I could see, about the strange lady who was running after him for his singing. So I had to wait about half an hour before he would be persuaded to sing... But at last he yielded and having once begun sang verse after verse, and I got it noted down. He sang it with a peculiar woodwind like quality of voice, which suggested a theme for orchestral treatment. "@en . . "2013-12-07T14:30:02+00:00"^^ . . . . . "Letter from Baroness Bunsen to her mother Mrs Waddington, 28 June 1819" . . . . . "Letter from Baroness Bunsen to her mother Mrs Waddington, 28 June 1819"@en . . . . "Sequenza for Violin" . . "Sequenza for Violin"@en . . . "Le Caliph de Bagdad" . "Le Caliph de Bagdad"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "unspecified church music" . . . . . . "unspecified church music (, performance of)"@en . "unspecified church music"@en . "http://solomon.tinyurl.alexanderstreet.com/15J9C%20"^^ . . "British and Irish Women's Letters and Diaries 1500-1950"@en . "2013-12-05"^^ . "Maiden Newton"@en . . . "The Band of the 7th Regiment"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Kinderstücke'"@en . . . . "Lenschow"@en . . . . . "

Last night Lukas, with his Brooklyn Philharmonia, conducted my Six Songs for High Voice and Orchestra which hadn't been done complete since 1954 in Paris. Geanie Faulkner, who sang in Kirchner's opera, was the pretty able soloist.

"^^ . "207" . "excerpt from 'The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem 1973-1985' pp. 207 (36 words)"@en . . . . "Song by Isidore de Lara" . . "Song by Isidore de Lara"@en . . . . . "performance of 'Piano Concerto No 3'"@en . . . . . . "November, 1870"@en . . "Carlo Alfredo Piatti"@en . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'The Last Post'"@en . "Aberystwyth"@en . . "Cyril Smith"@en . . . "Benediction in cadence" . "Benediction in cadence"@en . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Le sacre du printemps (1911-13)'"@en . "Burlington House"@en . . . . "42" . "2015-12-19T17:21:45+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "2015-10-13T12:04:52+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "8 August, 1982"@en . . . . . . "15 November, 1969"@en . . . . "176" . "2016-04-23T22:15:51+01:00"^^ . "Excerpt from 'Sovetskaya Muzykam' No.9, 1956."@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "2016-01-14T18:37:09+00:00"^^ . . . . . "Concerto Grosso (1930)" . . "Concerto Grosso (1930)"@en . . . . . "performance of 'Various'"@en . . . . . . "22 December, 1912"@en . . . "Opera" . "Opera"@en . . . . . "

\n

I’ve found a lot of instrumental music; one or two peasant violinists in every village; and girls and women who blow the alpine horn (a wooden horn nearly 3 metres long).

"^^ . "

I’ve found a lot of instrumental music; one or two peasant violinists in every village; and girls and women who blow the alpine horn (a wooden horn nearly 3 metres long).

"^^ . "107" . "excerpt from 'Béla Bartók Letters' pp. 107 (32 words)"@en . . . "Cara Verson"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Prokofiev's Classical Symphony'"@en . . . "Dinah" . "Dinah"@en . . "William Walton"@en . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Alessandro in persia [potpourri of music by a number of composers] / Penelope by Baldassare Galuppi'"@en . . . . . "unspecified piano music by Liszt and Bartók" . . . "unspecified piano music by Liszt and Bartók"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Meeresstille'"@en . . . "unknown music" . "unknown music"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Suite'"@en . . . . "99" . . . . . . . . . "The Parcel Post Service was looking for workers during the Christmas holidays and I immediately got a job.... When the job ended, I did a lot of practicing the next two months, including copying solos from records which really helped me. A lot of time was also spent at the movies by myself, and when I returned home, I’d imitate the trombonists I’d heard on the soundtracks. It was a productive period for me."@en . . "2014-12-09T16:42:20+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "First movement of Kalkbrenner's concerto'" . . "First movement of Kalkbrenner's concerto'"@en . . . . . . "13 February, 1883"@en . . . . . "

The unstaged preview performance at the Polignacs’ is clearer in my recollection than the actual première, which I conducted. I can still see the Princess’s salon, myself groaning at the piano, Souvtchinsky, loud and abrasive, singing Eumolpus, Claudel glaring at me from the other side of the keyboard, Gide bridling more noticeably with each phrase.

"^^ . "

The unstaged preview performance at the Polignacs’ is clearer in my recollection than the actual première, which I conducted. I can still see the Princess’s salon, myself groaning at the piano, Souvtchinsky, loud and abrasive, singing Eumolpus, Claudel glaring at me from the other side of the keyboard, Gide bridling more noticeably with each phrase.

"^^ . "177" . "excerpt from 'Memories and Commentaries' pp. 177 (59 words)"@en . . "Hugo Wolf"@en . . . "Classical recital" . "Classical recital"@en . . . . . . "31 December, 1941"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'To-day the Saviour Calls'"@en . . . "I'm going home to glorie" . "I'm going home to glorie"@en . . . . "101-102" . "2015-12-20T15:59:06+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "I saw Berlioz' \"Damnation of Faust\" at the Opéra - at least, I could see very little of the stage but I had a fine bird's-eye view of two trombone players who seemed to be having a fiery political argument whenever they had a few bars' rest. At one point they even left the pit, presumable to settle their differences once and for all."@en . . "2015-05-02T18:03:53+01:00"^^ . . . . . . "

\r\n

We have had such a fantastic weekend playing @SteveReich with @Ldn_Sinfonietta. What lovely people, brilliant players and great music!

"^^ . "excerpt from 'London Sinfonietta Audience Tweets' (20 words)"@en . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'folk melodies'"@en . . . . "Latvian Opera House"@en . . . . "20" . "2015-12-20T15:15:39+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "It was at the College that I first played for Beecham, though only in a rehearsal of the \"Eroica\" symphony. I remember a great deal of laughter, generally at somebody's expense and finally at mine. Determined to be noticed, I belted out the second clarinet part in the last movement with great ferocity. A pained expression came over Sir Thomas's face. \" The second clarinet\" he said in those endlessly imitated tones, \"sounds exactly like a hurdy-gurdy.\""@en . . "2015-03-14T13:49:39+00:00"^^ . . . . . . "

Some years ago I underwent the sorrow of hearing the noblest opera of modern times, Gounod's \"Faust,\" so carved, clipped, and mangled as to be almost unrecognisable. It was, in fact, a mere abridgment of the original work — not only were whole scenes left out, and others amalgamated or fused down into one another, to the utter destruction of the unities, but Niemann (Faust) cut out the second part of \" Salve dimora,\" and Mdlle. Baumgarten (Marguerite) omitted more than half of the jewel song, and a whole verse of the \" Ré di Thule.\" For such whole-sale and unscrupulous barbarism I was altogether unprepared in Berlin, which is ever being vaunted by its inhabitants as \"die Hauptstadt der Intelligenz.\" 

"^^ . "350" . "excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 350 (119 words)"@en . . . . "460" . "2016-01-28T14:07:51+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-07-02T11:47:14+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Scheherezade'"@en . . . "Choral Prelude" . . "Choral Prelude"@en . . . . "47" . "2015-12-19T16:33:19+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-10-09T15:23:48+01:00"^^ . . . . . "Phillips"@en . "Piala" . "Murray" . . . . "Piala Murray"@en . . . . . . "19 April, 1980"@en . . . "64"^^ . . . . "Schumann's Dichterlieb" . . "Schumann's Dichterlieb"@en . . . . . "174-5" . "2015-11-18T14:59:59+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-07-07T16:02:06+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . "February, 1965"@en . . . . "Schoenberg's 'Five Orchestral Pieces'" . . "Schoenberg's 'Five Orchestral Pieces'"@en . . . . "unspecified piano music by Messiaen" . . "unspecified piano music by Messiaen"@en . . . . . "

In 1996 it was John Peel's chance to choose his music choice for Meltdown. We tried to guess who he would choose and were delighted to attend two concerts in one day. Firstly, the Scottish poet Ivor Cutler who is a member of the Noise Abatement Society and later on Extreme Noise terror from Ipswich. Brilliant to see them on a large stage with great sound and a mix only John Peel could present.

"^^ . "excerpt from 'Southbank Centre Archive' (73 words)"@en . "John" . . "Goodgroome" . . . . . . . . "male" . . . "John Goodgroome"@en . "Lyre"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Ave Maria'"@en . . . . . "

My companion prevailed on me to accompany him to Padua, where he had business to transact. It was very little out of our way, and I had a strong desire to see that learned city. When we arrived, we went to an inn, called the Stella d'Oro. Padua was interesting to me, as the birth-place of Tartini ; and the two greatest singers of their time were living there retired, Pachierotti and Guadagni. The latter was a Cavaliere. He had built a house, or rather a palace, in which he had a very neat theatre, and a company of puppets, which represented L' Orpheo e Euridice ; himself singing the part of Orpheo behind the scenes. It was in this character, and in singing Gluck's beautiful rondo in it, \" Che faro senza Euridice,\" that he distinguished himself in every theatre in Europe, and drew such immense houses in London.

"^^ . "149-150" . "excerpt from 'Reminiscences of Michael Kelly' pp. 149-150 (147 words)"@en . . . . "George Bull"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of ''Design' for orchestra'"@en . . . . "Letter from Charles Burney to Thomas Twining, 31 July 1784" . . . . "Letter from Charles Burney to Thomas Twining, 31 July 1784"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of ''Scherzo á la Russe''"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'piano arrangements'"@en . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Sextet for clarinet, trumpet, violin, viola, cello & piano'"@en . . . . "Am I Blue" . . "Am I Blue"@en . . . . "Tosca" . . "Tosca"@en . . . "Sallie Turner"@en . . "Quakerism"@en . "Religious Society of Friends"@en . "Quakers"@en . "Bayonne, New Jersey"@en . . . . "Minutes to Midnight" . . "Minutes to Midnight"@en . . . . "31" . "2016-01-11T19:15:50+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "Sometimes, I awakened in the morning to the sound of folk songs, the villagers – fishermen and men who worked in the vineyards- singing as they went to work. Sometimes in the evening there were dances in the plaza and sometimes festivals at which the gralla was played. The gralla is a reed instrument which, I think, is probably of Moorish origin – it resembles an oboe and has a very strident sound. "@en . . "2015-02-21T21:50:01+00:00"^^ . . . . "Diary of Benjamin Britten, May 27 1931" . . . . . "Diary of Benjamin Britten, May 27 1931"@en . . . "Malcolm White"@en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Fidelio'"@en . "Aptos, California"@en . . "Luigi Boccherini"@en . . . . . . "29 January, 1828"@en . . . . . "

After the Fifth Symphony, I turned once more to the cinema and wrote the music for the film The Man with a Gun, produced by Sergei Yutkevich. / After this I wrote my First String Quartet. I began it with no particular thoughts or feelings, and thought that nothing would come of it. For the quartet is one of the most difficult musical genres. But soon the work took a proper hold of me. It turned out to be gay, jolly and lyrical, and I entitled it the ‘Springtime’ Quartet. I was very pleased with the splendid performance of the work by the Beethoven Quartet, who were also the excellent first interpreters of my next chamber work, my Piano Quintet. 

"^^ . "83" . "excerpt from 'Dmitry Shostakovich-About Himself and His Times' pp. 83 (121 words)"@en . . . "Captain Hooke"@en . . "Angela Lansbury"@en . . . . . "

\r\n

On his return to town in the evening, he attended a reception given in his honor at the Grosvenor Gallery by Walter Bache. This was in some respects the most striking function of the series. The gathering was in every sense a representative one, and the famous abbe, as he went round chatting from group to group, seemed positively radiant with happiness. To repeat his own words, addressed to myself: “You have so overwhelmed me with kindness in this country that I shall be quite sorry when the time comes for me to leave you.” The programme comprised his “Angelus” for strings, a chorus for female voices, a pianoforte piece, and some songs; and finally, amid a scene of great excitement, he himself played the finale of Schubert's “Divertissement a la Hongroise” and his own Hungarian rhapsody in A minor. This glorious treat furnished the crowning feature of a memorable evening— doubly memorable because it was the last time but one that Franz Liszt touched his instrument in the presence of a public or quasi-public assemblage.

"^^ . "

\r\n

On his return to town in the evening, he attended a reception given in his honor at the Grosvenor Gallery by Walter Bache. This was in some respects the most striking function of the series. The gathering was in every sense a representative one, and the famous abbe, as he went round chatting from group to group, seemed positively radiant with happiness. To repeat his own words, addressed to myself: “You have so overwhelmed me with kindness in this country that I shall be quite sorry when the time comes for me to leave you.” The programme comprised his “Angelus” for strings, a chorus for female voices, a pianoforte piece, and some songs; and finally, amid a scene of great excitement, he himself played the finale of Schubert's “Divertissement a la Hongroise” and his own Hungarian rhapsody in A minor. This glorious treat furnished the crowning feature of a memorable evening— doubly memorable because it was the last time but one that Franz Liszt touched his instrument in the presence of a public or quasi-public assemblage.

"^^ . "183" . "excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 183 (183 words)"@en . . . "For All the Saints Who from Their Labours Rest" . "For All the Saints Who from Their Labours Rest"@en . . . . . "1704"@en . . . . "Octet" . . "Octet"@en . . . . . . "12 April, 1814"@en . . . . . . "Memories: an autobiography" . . . . . "Memories: an autobiography"@en . . . . "22" . "2015-12-19T17:17:44+00:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . "2015-10-12T16:01:55+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "performance of 'Festal March'"@en . . . "There'll Come a Time" . "There'll Come a Time"@en . . . . . . "21 May, 2014"@en . . . "Augustus J. C. Hare"@en . . . "232" . "2015-10-24T11:24:45+01:00"^^ . "Quote taken from a letter from Sir Charles Halle's wife to her sister in New Orleans"@en . . . . . . . . "[L]ast Wednesday he [Sir Charles Halle] played a Concerto of Beethoven's for the Amateur Society ; he obtained a magnificent success ; I never saw such great and general enthusiasm."@en . . "2015-04-13T10:00:33+01:00"^^ . . . . . . . "7 June, 1907"@en . . "Schoolmistress"@en . . . . . "

Feb 25th 2005 my friend and I saw the remaining members of the MC5 + the Sun Ra Arkestra play together.  Recreating the sound, visuals + energy as if it were 1966.  The sheer power, energy + urgent excitement of the MC5 has always blown me away.  Mixing in the Space jazz of the Arkestra changed it from a full on rock 'n' roll assault to something else.  The 'something' they had been trying to create 40 years ago.  The power of 'Kick Out the Jams' + 'Over + Over' with the jazz cacophany apocalypse of 'Starship'.  Sitting amongst Bjork + Jason Spaceman (of Spiritualised) was a novelty.  But nothing topped meeting + chatting with Wayne Kramer of the MC5 + discussing the Phun City festival of 1970, near me + my friends home town of Worthing, Sussex.

"^^ . "excerpt from 'Southbank Centre Archive' (125 words)"@en . . "Rufus Jones"@en . . . . . "

Or take Fiorenza Cossotto. When she sang Santuzza’s aria in Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana (an opera, by the way, which I have never liked), everything became clear: she told of Santuzza’s sufferings only through her singing, standing almost motionless in a simple dress on the stage of the Grand Hall of the Conservatoire. /I hope I will not be suspected of underestimating the work of the producer, the artist, and, of course, the conductor. We are all aware of the difficulties of their work – difficulties that are all the greater, the more prominence is given to the element of singing.

"^^ . "

Or take Fiorenza Cossotto. When she sang Santuzza’s aria in Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana (an opera, by the way, which I have never liked), everything became clear: she told of Santuzza’s sufferings only through her singing, standing almost motionless in a simple dress on the stage of the Grand Hall of the Conservatoire. /I hope I will not be suspected of underestimating the work of the producer, the artist, and, of course, the conductor. We are all aware of the difficulties of their work – difficulties that are all the greater, the more prominence is given to the element of singing.

"^^ . "256-257" . "excerpt from 'Dmitry Shostakovich-About Himself and His Times' pp. 256-257 (106 words)"@en . . . . . "Diary of John Evelyn, 4 March 1656" . . . . "Diary of John Evelyn, 4 March 1656"@en . . . . . "Manuel de Falla" . . . . . . "10 July, 1669"@en . "https://archive.org/stream/reminiscencesofm02kellrich#page/278/mode/2up"^^ . . "2015-07-22"^^ . . . . . "

JH's fairly professional and highly therapeutic production, with piano, of The Apple Tree at his church.

"^^ . "276" . "excerpt from 'The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem 1973-1985' pp. 276 (16 words)"@en . . . . "82" . "2016-02-01T23:53:48+00:00"^^ . . . .