Understanding society: Families
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/y177_1
is a Unit , Document

Outgoing links

Property Object
subject There are 78 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
Dataset OpenLearn
Subject
Course y177
To y177
Relates to course y177
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2012-01-06T14:58:00.000Z
  • 2014-02-11T12:32:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-04T13:03:13.000Z
  • 2016-03-18T10:10:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-18T10:33:19.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Understanding society: Families
Title Understanding society: Families
Description
  • In this free course, Understanding society: Families, you will explore how different families have different ideas about how work in the home should be divided. You will also investigate the diversity of families. We will see how any discussion of the division of labour has to recognise that families differ in terms of shape and size. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/childhood-youth/early-years/understanding-society-families/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 06 Jan 2012 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/childhood-youth/early-years/understanding-society-families/content-section-0">Understanding society: Families</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2012
  • <p>Family life is continuously changing in many ways. This course looks at the change, or lack of change, in the role of women and men in the home. The discussion of this topic will focus on the connectedness between women’s work in the paid labour force and their work in the home. In addition, underlying this will be our recognition that family life today is characterised by diversity.</p><p>The main question we will be addressing is who does the work in the home? More specifically we want to look at how men and women in the UK share the shopping, cooking, cleaning, washing and ironing that happens regularly in all families. Of course other work takes place in the home, not least caring for children and other dependents and less regular and non routine house maintenance and DIY work. However, our focus here is a more limited one which will nevertheless introduce you to some of the key ideas and debates involved in studying family life.</p><p>We will begin with a summary of how work in the home has changed over the last fifty years or so, and look at the situation now, at the start of the twenty first century. You will also be given the opportunity to explore how different families may have different ideas about how work should be divided up. </p><p>The course concludes with an investigation into family diversity and note that any discussion of the division of labour has to recognise that families differ in terms of shape and size.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 1 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/education-childhood-and-youth?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Education, Childhood &amp; Youth</a></span></p>
  • In this free course, Understanding society: Families, you will explore how different families have different ideas about how work in the home should be divided. You will also investigate the diversity of families. We will see how any discussion of the division of labour has to recognise that families differ in terms of shape and size. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/childhood-youth/early-years/understanding-society-families/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 18 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/childhood-youth/early-years/understanding-society-families/content-section-0">Understanding society: Families</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • Here you will explore how different families have different ideas about how work in the home should be divided. You will also investigate the diversity of families. We will see how any discussion of the division of labour has to recognise that families differ in terms of shape and size.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/childhood-youth/early-years/understanding-society-families/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 06 Jan 2012 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/childhood-youth/early-years/understanding-society-families/content-section-0">Understanding society: Families</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2012
  • <p>Family life is continuously changing in many ways. This unit looks at the change, or lack of change, in the role of women and men in the home. The discussion of this topic will focus on the connectedness between women’s work in the paid labour force and their work in the home. In addition, underlying this will be our recognition that family life today is characterised by diversity.</p><p>The main question we will be addressing is who does the work in the home? More specifically we want to look at how men and women in the UK share the shopping, cooking, cleaning, washing and ironing that happens regularly in all families. Of course other work takes place in the home, not least caring for children and other dependents and less regular and non routine house maintenance and DIY work. However, our focus here is a more limited one which will nevertheless introduce you to some of the key ideas and debates involved in studying family life.</p><p>We will begin with a summary of how work in the home has changed over the last fifty years or so, and look at the situation now, at the start of the twenty first century. You will also be given the opportunity to explore how different families may have different ideas about how work should be divided up. </p><p>The unit concludes with an investigation into family diversity and note that any discussion of the division of labour has to recognise that families differ in terms of shape and size.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from Y177 <i>Understanding society</i>, a course which is no longer taught by The Open University, but which was part of our <i>Openings Programme</i> which has been replaced by our <i>Access modules</i>. This unit gives a good idea of the level of study on these modules.</p><p>If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/social-sciences/index.htm">subject area</a></span>.</p><p>If you are new to Higher Education you may want to consider our Access module Y032 <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/y032.htm"><i>People, work and society</i></a></p>
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University