Mountain building in Scotland
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/sxr339_1
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Subject
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Course sxr339
To sxr339
Relates to course sxr339
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-04-08T16:05:00.000Z
  • 2011-04-08T17:05:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T18:57:16.000Z
  • 2016-03-02T14:37:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-02T15:05:07.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Mountain building in Scotland
Title Mountain building in Scotland
Description
  • Some of Britain's most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This free course, Mountain building in Scotland, is an account of the origin and demise of that ancient mountain range, based on the geological evidence laid before us in rock exposures. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/geology/mountain-building-scotland/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 08 Apr 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/geology/mountain-building-scotland/content-section-0">Mountain building in Scotland</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>The course gives a brief outline of the geological history of the Scottish Highlands. It offers the opportunity to study igneous, metamorphic and structurally complex rocks, indicating their natural settings in Scotland: the deformed rocks of the Dalradian basin, the Caledonian granites, and the Highland Border Complex. The materials are presented as a series of PDFs. Each file represents a section of the book. If you wish to purchase a copy of <i>Mountain building in Scotland</i> please contact <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.ouworldwide.com/index.asp">Open University Worldwide</a></span>.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 3 study in <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/science?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Science</a>.</p>
  • Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account of the origin and demise of that ancient mountain range, based on the geological evidence laid before us in rock exposures.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/geology/mountain-building-scotland/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 08 Apr 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/geology/mountain-building-scotland/content-section-0">Mountain building in Scotland</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>The unit gives a brief outline of the geological history of the Scottish Highlands. It offers the opportunity to study igneous, metamorphic and structurally complex rocks, indicating their natural settings in Scotland: the deformed rocks of the Dalradian basin, the Caledonian granites, and the Highland Border Complex. The materials are presented as a series of PDFs. Each file represents a section of the book. If you wish to purchase a copy of <i>Mountain building in Scotland</i> please contact <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.ouworldwide.com/index.asp">Open University Worldwide</a></span>.</p><p>This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Ancient mountains: practical geology in Scotland (SXR339) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in <a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/science/index.htm">this subject area</a>.</p>
  • Some of Britain's most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This free course, Mountain building in Scotland, is an account of the origin and demise of that ancient mountain range, based on the geological evidence laid before us in rock exposures. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/geology/mountain-building-scotland/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 02 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/geology/mountain-building-scotland/content-section-0">Mountain building in Scotland</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016