Learning to teach: Mentoring and tutoring student teachers
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Published
  • 2014-02-21T10:02:00.000Z
  • 2014-02-21T10:17:03.000Z
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  • Copyright © 2014 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Learning to teach: Mentoring and tutoring student teachers
Title Learning to teach: Mentoring and tutoring student teachers
Description
  • This is the second of four units which comprise the course 'Learning to teach'. Traditionally student teachers are supported by a mentor in school and a tutor from a university. Both play distinctive and important parts in the teacher’s development. This unit examines each role in detail and explores the similarities and distinctions between the two roles. Whether you are a tutor or a mentor, effective teacher education relies on all partners working effectively together to create an environment where student teachers can critically reflect on their experiences in a structured way. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/learning-teach-mentoring-and-tutoring-student-teachers/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 21 Feb 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/learning-teach-mentoring-and-tutoring-student-teachers/content-section-0">Learning to teach: Mentoring and tutoring student teachers</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • This is the second of four units which comprise the course 'Learning to teach'. Traditionally student teachers are supported by a mentor in school and a tutor from a university. Both play distinctive and important parts in the teacher’s development. This unit examines each role in detail and explores the similarities and distinctions between the two roles. Whether you are a tutor or a mentor, effective teacher education relies on all partners working effectively together to create an environment where student teachers can critically reflect on their experiences in a structured way.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/learning-teach-mentoring-and-tutoring-student-teachers/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 21 Feb 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/learning-teach-mentoring-and-tutoring-student-teachers/content-section-0">Learning to teach: Mentoring and tutoring student teachers</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • This is the second of four courses which comprise the course Learning to teach. Traditionally student teachers are supported by a mentor in school and a tutor from a university. Both play distinctive and important parts in the teachers development. This free course, Mentoring and tutoring student teachers, examines each role in detail and explores the similarities and distinctions between the two roles. Whether you are a tutor or a mentor, effective teacher education relies on all partners working effectively together to create an environment where student teachers can critically reflect on their experiences in a structured way.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/learning-teach-mentoring-and-tutoring-student-teachers/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 21 Feb 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/education/learning-teach-mentoring-and-tutoring-student-teachers/content-section-0">Learning to teach: Mentoring and tutoring student teachers</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <p>This unit introduces the roles of the mentor and tutor in supporting student teachers. It explores the similarities and distinctions between these two roles, the need to balance student teacher support with appropriate levels of challenge and some commonly used approaches for supporting student teachers development. </p><p>Traditionally, student teachers have been supported by a mentor in school and a tutor at university. As a result of changes that are taking place in England, in the way in which Initial Teacher Education is organised and delivered, it is possible that, in the future, an increasing number of tutors may also be based in school, or may work jointly between a university and a school. The aim of this unit is to highlight how student teachers benefit from the involvement of two professionals with distinct, but different, roles.</p><p>Supporting beginner teachers, whether as a mentor or a tutor, can be a professionally rewarding experience, despite the time and energy involved. It provides opportunities to share best practice, and to connect with the latest research and developments in both subject pedagogy and broader educational practice. It provides an opportunity to engage in critically reflective dialogues about practice, with both the beginner teacher and others who support them. </p><p>For many, mentoring or tutoring is a valuable CPD opportunity as well as providing important evidence on a CV of involvement in the latest educational developments. This unit is underpinned by the belief that, from the student teacher’s point of view, both roles are important in supporting and guiding them, wherever the people concerned are based, and it aims to explore the differences and similarities between these two roles. </p>
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University