Reading
http://data.open.ac.uk/openlearn/gsg_3
is a Unit , Document

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Dataset OpenLearn
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Subject
Course gsg
To gsg
Relates to course gsg
URL content-section-0
Locator content-section-0
Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-18T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T19:05:39.000Z
  • 2014-08-28T16:01:46.000Z
  • 2014-08-29T13:01:51.000Z
  • 2014-09-04T09:11:00.000Z
  • 2014-09-04T09:31:59.000Z
  • 2016-01-07T10:02:39.000Z
  • 2016-01-08T15:01:47.000Z
  • 2016-02-08T16:02:55.000Z
  • 2016-02-10T10:31:43.000Z
  • 2016-03-08T16:36:09.000Z
  • [...]
There are 2 more objects.
You can use the links at the top of the page to download all the data.
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Reading
Title Reading
Description
  • <p><b>Reading is easy, isn't it?</b></p><p>On any ordinary day without even noticing, you read shop signs, newspaper headlines, TV listings, a magazine, or a chapter of a paperback. So why would a message like this one appear in an online student chat room in the early weeks of a course?</p><p> <span class="oucontent-inlinefigure"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/96002/mod_oucontent/oucontent/801/cab6234e/1f612083/gsg_3_i001i.jpg" alt="" width="342" height="128"/></span> </p><p>Clearly, reading for higher level study is quite different from everyday reading. The most obvious differences are:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Quantity</b> As a student you can find yourself reading for many more hours a week than usual.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Difficulty</b> Instead of the message slipping easily into your mind, as when you read a newspaper or a paperback, you find yourself having to concentrate to grasp it.</p> </li></ul><p>But there are also more subtle differences:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Purpose</b> Instead of reading to pick up information, or to be entertained, with studying your aim is to introduce yourself to <i>new ideas</i> and <i>ways of thinking</i>, which will enable you to understand the world differently.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Active engagement</b> Studying involves actively working with new ideas, not just racing through the words. You have to look for the <i>meaning</i> as you read, asking yourself <i>&#x2018;what is the author trying to say?’</i> </p> </li></ul><p>Research into how students read (see, for example, Entwistle 1997, p. 19) has shown that to be successful you need to understand these more hidden aspects of the reading process.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.ouworldwide.com/gsg.asp">Good Study Guides</a></span></p>
  • Reading is an essential skill for all of us and developing our skills in reading is a good investment. This unit is packed with practical activities which are aimed at making reading more enjoyable and rewarding. This unit also includes sections on how to read actively and critically. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 18 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0">Reading</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p><b>Reading is easy, isn't it?</b></p><p>On any ordinary day without even noticing, you read shop signs, newspaper headlines, TV listings, a magazine, or a chapter of a paperback. So why would a message like this one appear in an online student chat room in the early weeks of a course?</p><p> <span class="oucontent-inlinefigure"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/96002/mod_oucontent/oucontent/801/cab6234e/1f612083/gsg_3_i001i.jpg" alt="" width="342" height="128"/></span> </p><p>Clearly, reading for higher level study is quite different from everyday reading. The most obvious differences are:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Quantity</b> As a student you can find yourself reading for many more hours a week than usual.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Difficulty</b> Instead of the message slipping easily into your mind, as when you read a newspaper or a paperback, you find yourself having to concentrate to grasp it.</p> </li></ul><p>But there are also more subtle differences:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Purpose</b> Instead of reading to pick up information, or to be entertained, with studying your aim is to introduce yourself to <i>new ideas</i> and <i>ways of thinking</i>, which will enable you to understand the world differently.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Active engagement</b> Studying involves actively working with new ideas, not just racing through the words. You have to look for the <i>meaning</i> as you read, asking yourself <i>&#x2018;what is the author trying to say?’</i> </p> </li></ul><p>Research into how students read (see, for example, Entwistle 1997, p. 19) has shown that to be successful you need to understand these more hidden aspects of the reading process.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.ouworldwide.com/gsg.asp">Good Study Guides</a></span>.</p>
  • Reading is an essential skill for all of us and developing our skills in reading is a good investment. This unit is packed with practical activities which are aimed at making reading more enjoyable and rewarding. This unit also includes sections on how to read actively and critically.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 18 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0">Reading</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Reading is an essential skill for all of us and developing our skills in reading is a good investment. This free course is packed with practical activities which are aimed at making reading more enjoyable and rewarding. The course also includes sections on how to read actively and critically.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0" /> First published on Wed, 09 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0">Reading</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • Reading is an essential skill for all of us and developing our skills in reading is a good investment. This free course is packed with practical activities which are aimed at making reading more enjoyable and rewarding. The course also includes sections on how to read actively and critically.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 04 Sep 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0">Reading</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <p><b>Reading is easy, isn't it?</b></p><p>On any ordinary day without even noticing, you read shop signs, newspaper headlines, TV listings, a magazine, or a chapter of a paperback. So why would a message like this one appear in an online student chat room in the early weeks of a course?</p><p> <span class="oucontent-inlinefigure"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/96002/mod_oucontent/oucontent/801/cab6234e/1f612083/gsg_3_i001i.jpg" alt="" width="342" height="128"/></span> </p><p>Clearly, reading for higher level study is quite different from everyday reading. The most obvious differences are:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Quantity</b> As a student you can find yourself reading for many more hours a week than usual.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Difficulty</b> Instead of the message slipping easily into your mind, as when you read a newspaper or a paperback, you find yourself having to concentrate to grasp it.</p> </li></ul><p>But there are also more subtle differences:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Purpose</b> Instead of reading to pick up information, or to be entertained, with studying your aim is to introduce yourself to <i>new ideas</i> and <i>ways of thinking</i>, which will enable you to understand the world differently.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Active engagement</b> Studying involves actively working with new ideas, not just racing through the words. You have to look for the <i>meaning</i> as you read, asking yourself <i>&#x2018;what is the author trying to say?’</i> </p> </li></ul><p>Research into how students read (see, for example, Entwistle 1997, p. 19) has shown that to be successful you need to understand these more hidden aspects of the reading process.</p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q86?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Q86 <i>English Literature and Creative Writing</i></a></span>.</p>
  • Reading is an essential skill for all of us and developing our skills in reading is a good investment. This unit is packed with practical activities which are aimed at making reading more enjoyable and rewarding. This unit also includes sections on how to read actively and critically.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 04 Sep 2014 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/literature-and-creative-writing/reading/content-section-0">Reading</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2014
  • <p><b>Reading is easy, isn't it?</b></p><p>On any ordinary day without even noticing, you read shop signs, newspaper headlines, TV listings, a magazine, or a chapter of a paperback. So why would a message like this one appear in an online student chat room in the early weeks of a course?</p><p> <span class="oucontent-inlinefigure"><img src="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ocw/pluginfile.php/96002/mod_oucontent/oucontent/801/gsg_3_i001i.jpg" alt="" width="342" height="64"/></span> </p><p>Clearly, reading for higher level study is quite different from everyday reading. The most obvious differences are:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Quantity</b> As a student you can find yourself reading for many more hours a week than usual.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Difficulty</b> Instead of the message slipping easily into your mind, as when you read a newspaper or a paperback, you find yourself having to concentrate to grasp it.</p> </li></ul><p>But there are also more subtle differences:</p><ul class="oucontent-bulleted"><li> <p> <b>Purpose</b> Instead of reading to pick up information, or to be entertained, with studying your aim is to introduce yourself to <i>new ideas</i> and <i>ways of thinking</i>, which will enable you to understand the world differently.</p> </li><li> <p> <b>Active engagement</b> Studying involves actively working with new ideas, not just racing through the words. You have to look for the <i>meaning</i> as you read, asking yourself <i>&#x2018;what is the author trying to say?’</i> </p> </li></ul><p>Research into how students read (see, for example, Entwistle 1997, p. 19) has shown that to be successful you need to understand these more hidden aspects of the reading process.</p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.ouworldwide.com/gsg.asp">Good Study Guides</a></span></p>