Rights and justice in international relations
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Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Dataset OpenLearn
Course du301
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Language en-gb
Published
  • 2011-07-25T14:54:00.000Z
  • 2011-07-25T15:54:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T19:05:09.000Z
  • 2016-02-05T14:31:44.000Z
  • 2016-03-03T08:48:00.000Z
  • 2016-03-03T09:02:45.000Z
License
  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
Type
Label Rights and justice in international relations
Title Rights and justice in international relations
Description
  • Can the concept of human rights be applied across borders or are rights culturally specific? Is it realistic, or even desirable, to aim at an international system based on universal principles of justice? This unit takes a critical view of the assumption that ‘rights are a good thing’ and looks at the problems that arise when they are applied in the international arena. <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 25 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0">Rights and justice in international relations</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>This unit is about rights and rights claims, and the idea of implementing justice in the international sphere based on the concept of rights. It is agreed by most people that &#x2018;rights are a good thing’ and in many respects they are. However, this unit deliberately takes a critical view. It seeks to examine closely why rights are a good thing and highlights some of the problems associated with rights. In this way, we hope that the sense in which rights are still, ultimately, &#x2018;a good thing’ can be clarified and sharpened, and the valid reasons for rights thereby strengthened. The belief in rights based on a moral assertion of a common humanity that we all share is not self-justifying, and it needs to be located within the complex political field of international relations.</p><p>In <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-2.1">Section 2</a>, we look briefly at some aspects of the development of internationally recognised human rights as expressed in the UN Charter and 1948 Declaration. <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-3.1">Section 3</a> and <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-4.1">Section 4</a> consider rights and justice by elucidating the meaning of the terms and some of the debates about how best to conceptualise them. In <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-5.1">Section 5</a> and <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-6.1">Section 6</a>, the working definitions previously outlined are used to think about the impact that notions of rights and justice can have on international relations. In the concluding section (<a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-7">Section 7</a>), we consider the future of rights and justice in the international realm. </p><p>This unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course<span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/du301.htm"><i> A world of whose making?</i> (DU301).</a></span></p>
  • Can the concept of human rights be applied across borders or are rights culturally specific? Is it realistic, or even desirable, to aim at an international system based on universal principles of justice? This unit takes a critical view of the assumption that ‘rights are a good thing’ and looks at the problems that arise when they are applied in the international arena.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 25 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/society/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0">Rights and justice in international relations</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Can the concept of human rights be applied across borders or are rights culturally specific? Is it realistic, or even desirable, to aim at an international system based on universal principles of justice? This free course, Rights and justice in international relations, takes a critical view of the assumption that 'rights are a good thing' and looks at the problems that arise when they are applied in the international arena.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0" /> First published on Thu, 03 Mar 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0">Rights and justice in international relations</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
  • Can the concept of human rights be applied across borders or are rights culturally specific? Is it realistic, or even desirable, to aim at an international system based on universal principles of justice? This free course, Rights and justice in international relations, takes a critical view of the assumption that 'rights are a good thing' and looks at the problems that arise when they are applied in the international arena.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 25 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0">Rights and justice in international relations</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>This course is about rights and rights claims, and the idea of implementing justice in the international sphere based on the concept of rights. It is agreed by most people that &#x2018;rights are a good thing’ and in many respects they are. However, this course deliberately takes a critical view. It seeks to examine closely why rights are a good thing and highlights some of the problems associated with rights. In this way, we hope that the sense in which rights are still, ultimately, &#x2018;a good thing’ can be clarified and sharpened, and the valid reasons for rights thereby strengthened. The belief in rights based on a moral assertion of a common humanity that we all share is not self-justifying, and it needs to be located within the complex political field of international relations.</p><p>In <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-2.1">Section 2</a>, we look briefly at some aspects of the development of internationally recognised human rights as expressed in the UN Charter and 1948 Declaration. <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-3.1">Section 3</a> and <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-4.1">Section 4</a> consider rights and justice by elucidating the meaning of the terms and some of the debates about how best to conceptualise them. In <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-5.1">Section 5</a> and <a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-6.1">Section 6</a>, the working definitions previously outlined are used to think about the impact that notions of rights and justice can have on international relations. In the concluding section (<a class="oucontent-crossref" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-7">Section 7</a>), we consider the future of rights and justice in the international realm. </p><p>This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/modules/du301?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">DU301 <i>A world of whose making?</i></a></span>.</p>
  • Can the concept of human rights be applied across borders or are rights culturally specific? Is it realistic, or even desirable, to aim at an international system based on universal principles of justice? This unit takes a critical view of the assumption that ‘rights are a good thing’ and looks at the problems that arise when they are applied in the international arena.<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0" /> First published on Mon, 25 Jul 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/politics-policy-people/politics/rights-and-justice-international-relations/content-section-0">Rights and justice in international relations</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011