Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire
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  • 2011-06-24T09:00:00.000Z
  • 2011-06-24T10:33:00.000Z
  • 2013-12-05T19:09:21.000Z
  • 2016-01-15T12:03:00.000Z
  • 2016-01-15T12:31:52.000Z
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  • Copyright © 2013 The Open University
  • Copyright © 2016 The Open University
  • Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University
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  • Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire
  • Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: the people and the empire
Title
  • Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire
  • Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: the people and the empire
Description
  • In this unit we shall look more closely at the evidence available to assess the truth of this argument. Were the working people, as opposed to the political leaders, interested in the issue of expansion? Was such interest evident only among certain sections of the community? Was it predominantly an enthusiasm for empire or not? We shall also try to identify some of the reasons underlying the nature of the response. And we shall be interested in how far politicians found it worth their while to ‘play to the gallery’ and to manipulate popular opinion. Through it all, we shall be facing some acute problems of evidence: is it possible to discover what ‘ordinary’ people thought about expansionism?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/social-economic-history/late-nineteenth-century-britain-and-america-the-people-and-the-empire/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 24 Jun 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/social-economic-history/late-nineteenth-century-britain-and-america-the-people-and-the-empire/content-section-0">Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • <p>Historians on both sides of the Atlantic have argued that the empire was not an issue of popular interest in the late nineteenth-century Britain and the United States. This unit examines some of the evidence available to assess the truth of this claim. More broadly, the unit raises questions related to evidence: is it possible to discover what &#x2018;ordinary’ people thought about expansionism?</p><p>&#x2018;I couldn't give a damn’; &#x2018;I don't know anything about politics’; &#x2018;Why don't they leave us to get on with it?’ How often do we hear sentiments similar to these from the people on the proverbial street today? Yet there are some political issues which do arouse popular interest and concern. Historians on both sides of the Atlantic have argued that the empire was just such an issue in late nineteenth-century Britain and the United States. They urge that the question of expansion drew an enormous response from among the workers.</p><p>This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from <i>Understanding Comparative History: Britain and America</i> (AA303) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/arts-and-humanities/index.htm"> subject area</a></span>. </p>
  • <p>Historians on both sides of the Atlantic have argued that the empire was not an issue of popular interest in the late nineteenth-century Britain and the United States. This course examines some of the evidence available to assess the truth of this claim. More broadly, the course raises questions related to evidence: is it possible to discover what &#x2018;ordinary’ people thought about expansionism?</p><p>&#x2018;I couldn't give a damn’; &#x2018;I don't know anything about politics’; &#x2018;Why don't they leave us to get on with it?’ How often do we hear sentiments similar to these from the people on the proverbial street today? Yet there are some political issues which do arouse popular interest and concern. Historians on both sides of the Atlantic have argued that the empire was just such an issue in late nineteenth-century Britain and the United States. They urge that the question of expansion drew an enormous response from among the workers.</p><p>This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 3 study in <span class="oucontent-linkwithtip"><a class="oucontent-hyperlink" href="http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/find/arts-and-humanities?LKCAMPAIGN=ebook_&amp;MEDIA=ou">Arts and Humanities</a></span>.</p>
  • Historians on both sides of the Atlantic have argued that the empire was not an issue of popular interest in late nineteenth-century Britain and the United States. In this free course, Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire, we shall look more closely at the evidence available to assess the truth of this argument. Were the working people, as opposed to the political leaders, interested in the issue of expansion? Was such interest evident only among certain sections of the community? Was it predominantly an enthusiasm for empire, or not? We shall also try to identify some of the reasons underlying the nature of the response. And we shall be interested in how far politicians found it worth their while to 'play to the gallery' and to manipulate popular opinion. Through it all, we shall be facing some acute problems of evidence: is it possible to discover what 'ordinary' people thought about expansionism?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/social-economic-history/late-nineteenth-century-britain-and-america-the-people-and-the-empire/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 24 Jun 2011 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/social-economic-history/late-nineteenth-century-britain-and-america-the-people-and-the-empire/content-section-0">Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2011
  • Historians on both sides of the Atlantic have argued that the empire was not an issue of popular interest in late nineteenth-century Britain and the United States. In this free course, Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire, we shall look more closely at the evidence available to assess the truth of this argument. Were the working people, as opposed to the political leaders, interested in the issue of expansion? Was such interest evident only among certain sections of the community? Was it predominantly an enthusiasm for empire, or not? We shall also try to identify some of the reasons underlying the nature of the response. And we shall be interested in how far politicians found it worth their while to 'play to the gallery' and to manipulate popular opinion. Through it all, we shall be facing some acute problems of evidence: is it possible to discover what 'ordinary' people thought about expansionism?<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/social-economic-history/late-nineteenth-century-britain-and-america-the-people-and-the-empire/content-section-0" /> First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/social-economic-history/late-nineteenth-century-britain-and-america-the-people-and-the-empire/content-section-0">Late nineteenth-century Britain and America: The people and the empire</a>. To find out more visit The Open University's <a href="http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ole-home-page">Openlearn</a> website. Creative-Commons 2016
Creator The Open University
Publisher The Open University
Course Understanding Comparative History
To Understanding Comparative History
Relates to course Understanding Comparative History